Book Riot's Read Harder Challenge discussion

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Task Ideas/Resources/Discussions > Tasks specifying reading level

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message 1: by Erin (last edited May 14, 2020 02:09PM) (new)

Erin (erinm31) I am curious how people feel about reading level being specified for several of the tasks — for 2020 there are YA nonfiction, middle-grade and picture books. Do you feel there is a benefit to this and if so, what? I’m thinking, without the level being specified, those of any reading level could do all tasks at their own level. I know I loved reading challenges growing up. Conversely, I don’t see what one gains by seeking books below one’s reading level, not that I haven’t enjoyed such on occasion, but it seems to me the opposite of challenging oneself.

So far, other tasks that I at first felt ambivalent about, I’ve found something that interests me and fits or better yet, I’ve found something new I didn’t know I was interested in. =) But with the middle-grade category, I can’t help but feel I’d be wasting my time to read one of these. I’d be happy to hear others’ perspectives on this!


message 2: by Dustyloup (new)

Dustyloup I think that's part of the challenge, to explore different genres, to be aware of the vast array of books, genres etc. sometimes we get so into a certain genre that we don't realize what else is out there. if you have children/family, it's good to be aware of books you could recommend to nieces, nephews, etc. children's literature can be a lot more intelligent than we think it is too.
that being said, yes it's "harder" to choose something in these categories because we aren't passionate about them or don't know much about them.
how about asking a librarian for help? tell him/her you're doing it for a reading challenge and I bet you'll get some great recommendations.
Do you speak/read another language? if so, I think you might find some very interesting reads that would be a means to challenge yourself. the only problem I've had is figuring out how to match grade levels. I'm not sure how to find middle grade books in French, but I've still got over 6 months!


message 3: by Erin (new)

Erin (erinm31) Dustyloup wrote: "I think that's part of the challenge, to explore different genres, to be aware of the vast array of books, genres etc. sometimes we get so into a certain genre that we don't realize what else is ou..."

Thank you for sharing your thoughts! Those are good points and I do especially like the idea of taking the opportunity of reading a book in another language! =)


message 4: by Sat (new)

Sat Siri | 15 comments This is my second year doing the Read Harder Challenge and I was surprised about the reading level tasks at first, too. I became a commuter last year, and try to find audiobooks on the Libby aap to complete each task. I enjoyed the YA, picture book, and middle grade books I chose. The task that was the hardest for me was an indie press Horror book. I won’t read Horror, but wanted to complete all of the challenges. I spoke with a librarian for help, who suggested children’s books. I ended up reading the first three books in the Bunnicula series (not indie,) but I felt ok about choosing below my reading level because of the other three tasks. An added bonus was getting to share some laughs with my adult daughters who loved Bunnicula when they were kids. I was also inspired to read about the author.

1. Read a YA Nonfiction book - I Will Always Write Back: How One Letter Changed Two Lives by Caitlin Alifirenka and Martin Ganda

18. Read a picture book with a human main character from a marginalized community - It Began With a Page: How Gyo Fujikawa Drew The Way by Kyo MacLear

20. Read a middle grade book that doesn’t take place in the U.S. or the UK - Heidi by Johanna Spyri


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