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On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft
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Chrys Fey (chrysfey) Discussion for On Writing by Stephen King.


Hello Writers and Readers!

From now on we will hold all book discussions in one spot.

If you posted a review of On Writing, please feel free to copy and paste it here.

Let us know your overall thoughts.

You can also answer the optional questions below.

We also encourage you to reply to anyone's comments to create a conversation.


Let's have some fun!


1. Stephen King says, “You can read anywhere, almost, but when it comes to writing, library carrels, park benches, and rented flats should be courts of last resort."

QUESTIONS: Where do you like to write? Have you written in the places King says should be last resorts and found them to work better for you?


2. QUESTION: King states that story comes first, never theme. I disagree. Do you think a theme only develops after the story has come together or can a good story be developed from a theme?


3. QUESTIONS: What "tools" do you find most indispensable when you write? Are there any you would add to King's toolbox (which includes grammar, vocabulary, elements of style and form, character development, descriptions, dialogue, tools for revision help)?


4. QUESTIONS: King believes that stories are "found things, like fossils in the ground." Let’s discuss King's extended metaphor of "writing as excavation." Do you agree with this theory? How would you describe writing if different from his point-of-view?


5. QUESTIONS: Was this your first time reading a book by Stephen King or were you a fan before? Either way, what did you think of his book On Writing?


Madeline Mora-Summonte (madelinemora-summonte) 1 - I work best tucked into my home office but other places in my home can work, too. I find I can't concentrate as well out and about, although I can do things like brainstorm, jot notes, etc.

4 - I love the idea of stories as "found things, like fossils in the ground" and I would say that description is close/works well for my process. I've also read/heard him talk about stories as pieces that fit together, like a cup and a handle, and how you might have that handle for a bit before you find the cup that fits. (Paraphrasing there!)

5 - Big fan for a very, very long time. :)


message 3: by Juneta, Book Club Moderator (last edited Jan 22, 2020 10:08AM) (new)

Juneta Key | 73 comments 1. Stephen King says, “You can read anywhere, almost, but when it comes to writing, library carrels, park benches, and rented flats should be courts of last resort."

QUESTIONS: Where do you like to write? Have you written in the places King says should be last resorts and found them to work better for you?

I write in my room where I feel most comfortable and get away from excess noise and people moving around. I would like to try other places but so far have not.


2. QUESTION: King states that story comes first, never theme. I disagree. Do you think a theme only develops after the story has come together or can a good story be developed from a theme?

I think can develop a story from a theme, but the story for me normal comes first as that feels most natural. I might use the theme as inspiration but there is no guarantee my muse will create story to that theme.

I would have to at least use the 5 to 7 plot points version of plotting if I chose to use a theme with 10 key scenes as C. S. Larkin teaches, which I have found helpful.

3. QUESTIONS: What "tools" do you find most indispensable when you write? Are there any you would add to King's toolbox (which includes grammar, vocabulary, elements of style and form, character development, descriptions, dialogue, tools for revision help)?

Scrivener and Holly Lisle's How To Revise Your Novel Course.

4. QUESTIONS: King believes that stories are "found things, like fossils in the ground." Let’s discuss King's extended metaphor of "writing as excavation." Do you agree with this theory? How would you describe writing if different from his point-of-view?

I agree with his theory, but it is not the only way. I really like the idea and most times that is how it feels, but...

I think the story at times can appear fully formed in the mind and it is just a matter of hammering it out and tweaking or another metaphor, you shape and mold it like clay.

Sometimes its like pulling teeth and wrestling the alligator.


5. QUESTIONS: Was this your first time reading a book by Stephen King or were you a fan before? Either way, what did you think of his book On Writing?

I have read some of his earlier work, seen the movies and some of it I am a fan of others not so much. I had read this book before. I enjoyed it and learn some things but mostly just enjoyed seeing his writing process as some of it did not fit me. I would like to read something about his screenplay or movies and his process there.


message 4: by Juneta, Book Club Moderator (last edited Jan 22, 2020 01:41PM) (new)

Juneta Key | 73 comments Madeline wrote: "1 - I work best tucked into my home office but other places in my home can work, too. I find I can't concentrate as well out and about, although I can do things like brainstorm, jot notes, etc.

4..."


Noise and lots of movement distract me too. I wanna try some other places some day. I like the idea of stories as found things too.


message 5: by Tyrean (new)

Tyrean | 13 comments 1 - I like writing at home, but my favorite current spot is at a Write-up, Write Together group on Tuesdays at a local community college. We use the classroom for free thanks to one of our members and we just sit and write.together. It helps to see others writing around me. And I actually like writing in public places at least once or twice a week - it jars loose all the woolly Writer's blockage. But I wouldn't want to write that way all the time.
2 - What comes first? I think it depends. I've started with a dream image, song lyrics, a theme, a character with a problem, and "story" which combines all of that jumble in my head first on the good days.

3 - we need all of those tools, but lately I have been trying to sharpen my description and metaphor tools into something with edges and depth. Key word: trying

4 - I feel like writing is a dance and a song, and sometimes there's digging, stomping, tapping, and stretching involved. Sometimes, I have to run some scales first. I think his metaphor has some merit but I'm not satisfied with it.

5 - I think the first one I read was The Shining. I lived in an old house so I read it in the summer, in full daylight in the kitchen instead of in my room near the closet which had access to the attic. I was in high school. And this is my fourth time reading On Writing. I don't love all of it, but I do enjoy most of it.


Naughty (therealcie) | 12 comments https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...
I have been a fan of Stephen King for many years. I read this book when it first came out and enjoyed reading it again. Of course, I am very glad that he survived his terrible accident and is now doing better.
I would not thrive writing the way Mr. King recommends: by shutting myself in a room for two hours with everything tuned out. I would start to feel as if I was in a dungeon fairly quickly. I am based in my living room where I can look out the window. I don't know if he would like my writing. I enjoy some of the elements that he recommends eliminating. However, I did learn two things from him a long time ago: mind the adverbs, and watch out for overly long and descriptive sentences.
I am glad to have this book in my library again.

1. Stephen King says, “You can read anywhere, almost, but when it comes to writing, library carrels, park benches, and rented flats should be courts of last resort."

I reckon you've gotta write where you've gotta write. However, I doubt I'd get much writing done on a park bench. Probably nothing more than a bit of note-taking would transpire there.

QUESTIONS: Where do you like to write? Have you written in the places King says should be last resorts and found them to work better for you?

I usually write in the living room with my butt parked on the dilapidated couch that doubles as my bed. I don't write much of anywhere else at this juncture.

2. QUESTION: King states that story comes first, never theme. I disagree. Do you think a theme only develops after the story has come together or can a good story be developed from a theme?

I usually don't think much about the theme beyond it planting a seed in my disheveled brain. I probably have a theme in mind when I start.

3. QUESTIONS: What "tools" do you find most indispensable when you write? Are there any you would add to King's toolbox (which includes grammar, vocabulary, elements of style and form, character development, descriptions, dialogue, tools for revision help)?

Coffee.

4. QUESTIONS: King believes that stories are "found things, like fossils in the ground." Let’s discuss King's extended metaphor of "writing as excavation." Do you agree with this theory? How would you describe writing if different from his point-of-view?

Sometimes my story ideas come sailing through the air and smack me on the head.

5. QUESTIONS: Was this your first time reading a book by Stephen King or were you a fan before? Either way, what did you think of his book On Writing?

I've been a big fan since I was about fourteen years old. Stephen King is one of those people that I'd love to meet except for the fact that he'd probably think I was the biggest loser to ever be plopped down on this lousy planet, so I imagine I'd slink off into the shadows if the opportunity to meet him ever arose.

I think that On Writing has many excellent suggestions. Not all of them work for me.


message 7: by Steven (last edited Jan 22, 2020 05:59PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Steven Streeter On Writing is my go-to writing book. I read it every couple of years to remind myself of little things.

The questions!
1. Stephen King says, “You can read anywhere, almost, but when it comes to writing, library carrels, park benches, and rented flats should be courts of last resort."
QUESTIONS: Where do you like to write? Have you written in the places King says should be last resorts and found them to work better for you?
* I like to write wherever I can, but my favourite is at the kitchen table with music playing or in the gazebo by the beach or on a chair in my back-yard. I have tried writing in libraries, but can't, have never rented a flat and the park bench thing I have never considered.

2. QUESTION: King states that story comes first, never theme. I disagree. Do you think a theme only develops after the story has come together or can a good story be developed from a theme?
* I agree with King. I hate being hit over the head with a theme. In fact, I find way too many books put theme front and centre to the detriment of the story. Thematic stories lack something to me. I have read very, very few good stories where I know theme has come first; I have read many where I know theme was not even a consideration that are really good. Stories are written for entertainment first and foremost... in my opinion.

3. QUESTIONS: What "tools" do you find most indispensable when you write? Are there any you would add to King's toolbox (which includes grammar, vocabulary, elements of style and form, character development, descriptions, dialogue, tools for revision help)?
* No, and because of On Writing I have made sure I keep these tools sharp and up-to-date. So many writers I have come across in my work as an editor feel they only need a good story because an editor will fix all the rest. This is nonsense. A good story will fail if the tools are not utilised, and utilised properly at that. Yes, no-one is going to be 100% perfect, but when I read something that has 2 misplaced homophones, no punctuation and verb tense shift in the first paragraph, I am not going to bother reading the rest. (And, yes, I received a story just like that as a submission to an anthology...)

4. QUESTIONS: King believes that stories are "found things, like fossils in the ground." Let’s discuss King's extended metaphor of "writing as excavation." Do you agree with this theory? How would you describe writing if different from his point-of-view?
* Sometimes I find stories are sparks that just appear out of nowhere, but generally, I agree with him.

5. QUESTIONS: Was this your first time reading a book by Stephen King or were you a fan before? Either way, what did you think of his book On Writing?
*As I mentioned, I read it every few years or so. I have been reading King since 1984 (I was 13) and there are only 3 books of his I do not own (I think). King was my writing hero for a long time and I wanted to be like him, so much so that I was accused of writing King pastiches early on in what I shall laughingly refer to as my career. He is still my writing hero, but I realise I write more like Haggard, Howard, Fanthorpe, et al. - pulp fiction at its finest. I am fine with that. I am no Stephen King. But he was one of the main inspirations to me becoming a writer.


message 8: by Chrys (new) - added it

Chrys Fey (chrysfey) Steven wrote: "I like to write wherever I can, but my favourite is at the kitchen table with music playing or in the gazebo by the beach"

In a gazebo by the beach sounds lovely.


message 9: by Chrys (new) - added it

Chrys Fey (chrysfey) Team wrote: "Coffee."

Yes! Coffee!


message 10: by Juneta, Book Club Moderator (new)

Juneta Key | 73 comments Chrys wrote: "Team wrote: "Coffee."

Yes! Coffee!"


Always coffee and the gazebo does sound nice.


message 11: by Rebecca (new)

Rebecca Douglass (rdouglass) | 30 comments I read this book years ago, and didn't get around to re-reading. But I can answer some of the questions anyway :)

1. I can and will write pretty much anywhere. Back when my kids were younger, I did a lot of my writing in doctors' waiting rooms and the like. Sometimes I go to a cafe, though mostly I migrate around my house. And I could probably write on a park bench, aside from the comfort issues.

A library carrell would help me to focus, I think. Though back in my grad school days I usually just fell asleep there.

5. This is the only Steven King I've read. I don't care for his genre (horror), but am willing to believe he's good at it.

I think he was the one who really discouraged me, though, by saying that a real writer writes every day, and that if you find that hard, maybe you aren't a writer? Or am I mixing him up with someone else? Because that idea is bull-pucky. Life gets in the way. writing happens when you can make it happen, and sometimes you can't. Doesn't make you any less a writer.


message 12: by Tyrean (new)

Tyrean | 13 comments I really like the adage of writing at least one line every day, but I write when and where I can. I strive.for reaching a daily word count,, but if I don't make it, I write another day. It's okay to rest and some writers are amazing weekend warrior novelists - writing once or twice a week and producing some amazing work. I think we write and that makes us writers.


Jennifer Worrell (jenniferworrell) 1. Stephen King says, “You can read anywhere, almost, but when it comes to writing, library carrels, park benches, and rented flats should be courts of last resort." QUESTIONS: Where do you like to write? Have you written in the places King says should be last resorts and found them to work better for you?

I live in a rented flat, so, sorry Steve. I've written in lots of different places, and what I need is zero distractions and a little space so I can take notes on paper while I type.

2. QUESTION: King states that story comes first, never theme. I disagree. Do you think a theme only develops after the story has come together or can a good story be developed from a theme?

This was my biggest disagreement. So much can come from theme; that's where I often get ideas for plots. If you find a theme you're interested in, that's where the passion and emotion come from.


3. QUESTIONS: What "tools" do you find most indispensable when you write? Are there any you would add to King's toolbox (which includes grammar, vocabulary, elements of style and form, character development, descriptions, dialogue, tools for revision help)?

I had a tough time with this one. I'm not the best with structure so I could use a little of that.


4. QUESTIONS: King believes that stories are "found things, like fossils in the ground." Let’s discuss King's extended metaphor of "writing as excavation." Do you agree with this theory? How would you describe writing if different from his point-of-view?

I love this theory. It's a tip of the hat to pantsers, sticking his tongue out to the haters. Nice. I think that way of thinking will help with a WIP.


5. QUESTIONS: Was this your first time reading a book by Stephen King or were you a fan before? Either way, what did you think of his book On Writing?

I read The Long Walk, and that was it. It pissed me off, how poorly it was done, but it kept me reading. That alone fascinated me.

I liked On Writing, but not for the advice as much as his comedic storytelling. He's such a pleasure to spend time with! A natural. The advice, at this point in life, was nothing I hadn't heard before, but it still kept me interested for his personal approach to the subject.


message 14: by Chrys (new) - added it

Chrys Fey (chrysfey) Jennifer wrote: "I read The Long Walk, and that was it. It pissed me off, how poorly it was done, but it kept me reading. That alone fascinated me."

Poor writing but you kept reading? That is fascinating! :D


Jennifer Worrell (jenniferworrell) Chrys wrote: "Jennifer wrote: "I read The Long Walk, and that was it. It pissed me off, how poorly it was done, but it kept me reading. That alone fascinated me."

Poor writing but you kept reading? That is fasc..."


Right? I'd be interested to know why that is. I can't recommend the book and yet I kept going. There's something I might need in my toolbox.


message 16: by Juneta, Book Club Moderator (new)

Juneta Key | 73 comments Tyrean wrote: "I really like the adage of writing at least one line every day, but I write when and where I can. I strive.for reaching a daily word count,, but if I don't make it, I write another day. It's okay t..."

One line a day seems like it should be manageable, but like you, I write when I can.


Janet (crumj) | 4 comments Steven wrote: "On Writing is my go-to writing book. I read it every couple of years to remind myself of little things.

The questions!
1. Stephen King says, “You can read anywhere, almost, but when it comes to wr..."


I agree completely with your take on theme. Story first, always. Theme can enrich, but story is primary.


Janet (crumj) | 4 comments Chrys wrote: "Jennifer wrote: "I read The Long Walk, and that was it. It pissed me off, how poorly it was done, but it kept me reading. That alone fascinated me."

Poor writing but you kept reading? That is fasc..."


Yeah, The Long Walk was one of his very early works. Cool premise but didn't thrill me. I love many of his other works though.


Janet (crumj) | 4 comments 1. Stephen King says, “You can read anywhere, almost, but when it comes to writing, library carrels, park benches, and rented flats should be courts of last resort."
QUESTIONS: Where do you like to write? Have you written in the places King says should be last resorts and found them to work better for you?

I prefer to write in a quiet space, alone and without distractions. I can write in libraries and coffee shops if I have earbuds in and listen to some kind of white noise (the Nature Noise Spotify playlist is my go-to).

2. QUESTION: King states that story comes first, never theme. I disagree. Do you think a theme only develops after the story has come together or can a good story be developed from a theme?

I'm 100% with King on this. My stories all end up having themes, but they start as stories. As a reader, I'm not interested in reading something that hits me over the head with theme. Plot and characters are the essentials. Theme adds depth and richness if it's handled with a light touch.

3. QUESTIONS: What "tools" do you find most indispensable when you write? Are there any you would add to King's toolbox (which includes grammar, vocabulary, elements of style and form, character development, descriptions, dialogue, tools for revision help)?

I think he has it covered here, though I'd add - read books about these tools. Take time to learn the craft and keep learning. Writing is a skill that can and should be learned, not some magic fairy dust sprinkled on your head.

4. QUESTIONS: King believes that stories are "found things, like fossils in the ground." Let’s discuss King's extended metaphor of "writing as excavation." Do you agree with this theory? How would you describe writing if different from his point-of-view?

My stories are all found, though I find them in different places (people I meet, images from dreams, "what if..." musings, conversations... stories are everywhere). And yeah, the excavation metaphor works for me. Dig 'em out, clean 'em up, shape 'em into something others will enjoy.

5. QUESTIONS: Was this your first time reading a book by Stephen King or were you a fan before? Either way, what did you think of his book On Writing?

I have been a Stephen King fan since I read The Stand at the ripe ol' age of 16 (mumble mumble years ago). He is an incredibly gifted storyteller, and that comes through in On Writing, which is one of my favorite books of all time.


message 20: by Toi, Book Club Admin (last edited Jan 28, 2020 10:56AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Toi Thomas (toithomas) | 103 comments I didn’t agree with everything King said in his book but did enjoy reading it. I gave it 5 stars. See my review here: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show.... Now, on to the questions.

1. Where do you like to write?
I like to write in bed but know I shouldn’t. I have a desk but rarely use it. I write a lot at my kitchen table or on the couch.

Have you written in the places King says should be last resorts and found them to work better for you?
Anytime I’ve ever tried to write at the library, I ended up reading a book instead. Still, I have written some good scenes while waiting for my meal in a food court before.

2. Do you think a theme only develops after the story has come together or can a good story be developed from a theme?

I agree that you can’t write a truly good story and not have dynamic themes appear naturally, but I don’t agree that you can’t plan for this ahead of time. I admit that when I wrote my first story, many of the greater themes didn't stand out to me until the second draft. Still, there have been times when I’ve developed an entire story around particular themes I wanted to incorporate. I also understand that writing to a prompt and writing to a theme are two very different things.

3. What "tools" do you find most indispensable when you write? Are there any you would add to King's toolbox (which includes grammar, vocabulary, elements of style and form, character development, descriptions, dialogue, tools for revision help)?

Since he’s not much of a plotter it makes sense that he wouldn’t list this, but I think plotting and research are important tools in my writing. And since I struggle so much with execution, I think POV is also important.

4. Let’s discuss King's extended metaphor of "writing as excavation." Do you agree with this theory? How would you describe writing if different from his point-of-view?

When I read this metaphor I kept thinking, “He’s got it all wrong. It’s more like trying to find the missing pieces of a puzzle.” The problem with excavation is that you never know what you’re going to get until you’ve got it all. You might think you’re digging up a dog bone and end up with a T-Rex femur. I think the excavation imagery had me imagining that a story could start off as a suspense thriller and end up being a HEA romance by the end. Finding the pieces of a puzzle works much better for me because you get to move characters and plot points around until you have the “big picture,” the story you really want to tell and not just the ideas you started with.

5. Was this your first time reading a book by Stephen King or were you a fan before? Either way, what did you think of his book On Writing?

No, but this was my first time reading this book. I really liked it. I’m not a huge King fan. Some of his work I love, some of it I don’t. I honestly haven’t read that much of it, but I like this and respect him even more as a great writer than I did before.


message 21: by Toi, Book Club Admin (new) - rated it 5 stars

Toi Thomas (toithomas) | 103 comments Madeline wrote: "1 - I work best tucked into my home office but other places in my home can work, too. I find I can't concentrate as well out and about, although I can do things like brainstorm, jot notes, etc.

4..."


I forgot about the cup and handle metaphor. I do like that one.


message 22: by Toi, Book Club Admin (new) - rated it 5 stars

Toi Thomas (toithomas) | 103 comments Juneta wrote: "1. Stephen King says, “You can read anywhere, almost, but when it comes to writing, library carrels, park benches, and rented flats should be courts of last resort."

QUESTIONS: Where do you like t..."


I like the idea of molding a story like clay.


message 23: by Toi, Book Club Admin (new) - rated it 5 stars

Toi Thomas (toithomas) | 103 comments Tyrean wrote: "1 - I like writing at home, but my favorite current spot is at a Write-up, Write Together group on Tuesdays at a local community college. We use the classroom for free thanks to one of our members ..."

I'd never had the experience of writing in a group until I attending my first writer's conference. It was a good experience, but I don't think I could do that all the time.


message 24: by Toi, Book Club Admin (new) - rated it 5 stars

Toi Thomas (toithomas) | 103 comments Team wrote: "https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...
I have been a fan of Stephen King for many years. I read this book when it first came out and enjoyed reading it again. Of course, I am very glad th..."


I'm glad I'm not the only one writing on my couch.
Coffee for you, tea for me. :D


message 25: by Toi, Book Club Admin (new) - rated it 5 stars

Toi Thomas (toithomas) | 103 comments Rebecca wrote: "I read this book years ago, and didn't get around to re-reading. But I can answer some of the questions anyway :)

1. I can and will write pretty much anywhere. Back when my kids were younger, I di..."


Janet wrote: "1. Stephen King says, “You can read anywhere, almost, but when it comes to writing, library carrels, park benches, and rented flats should be courts of last resort."
QUESTIONS: Where do you like to..."


I agree with bull-pucky. I think every writer would like to write every day, but sometimes life doesn't let you. I think some writers give up writing when they can't handle the pressure to write something every day. If you can great, but if you don't, that doesn't mean you aren't a writer.


message 26: by Toi, Book Club Admin (new) - rated it 5 stars

Toi Thomas (toithomas) | 103 comments Tyrean wrote: "I really like the adage of writing at least one line every day, but I write when and where I can. I strive.for reaching a daily word count,, but if I don't make it, I write another day. It's okay t..."

Yes :D


message 27: by Toi, Book Club Admin (new) - rated it 5 stars

Toi Thomas (toithomas) | 103 comments Jennifer wrote: "1. Stephen King says, “You can read anywhere, almost, but when it comes to writing, library carrels, park benches, and rented flats should be courts of last resort." QUESTIONS: Where do you like to..."

I agree King had a comedic and inviting way of sharing his story in this book.


message 28: by Chrys (new) - added it

Chrys Fey (chrysfey) Finally getting around to adding my answers.


1. I like to write at home. Either at my desk, on my couch, or at my kitchen table. Which of those places I choose depends on my muse. But I've always wanted to try writing at my local park and library. One day, I will.


2. I never think about theme while writing a story. As a matter of fact, I don't even consider it after I've written a story. For me, I think it comes naturally. But you can certainly develop a story first based on a theme you want to try out.


3. A real tool I find indispensable is Drop Box. All hail Drop Box!


4. The metaphor works. Stories are found things...or things that want to be found so they zoom up and bop you in the head. lol


5. This was my first time reading a Stephen King book cover to cover. I attempted to read The Shining (a few times), Salem's Lot, and Under the Dome but for each of them I couldn't get past the first few chapters.


message 29: by Chrys (new) - added it

Chrys Fey (chrysfey) Toi wrote: "The problem with excavation is that you never know what you’re going to get until you’ve got it all. "

Well, for a writer who is a pantser, it could very well be like that. You don't know what you're going to get and may end up writing a different kind of story. When I write, I always know how the story will end, though.

Oh, and a suspense thriller could end up being a HEA romance by the end....that's called romantic-suspense. LOL!!!

But your puzzle piece metaphor works very well.

And excellent points about plotting and POV being in the toolbox. Those are two of my most important tools, too.


message 30: by Ronel, Book Club Moderator (new) - rated it 5 stars

Ronel Janse van Vuuren (miladyronel) | 35 comments You can check out my 2018 review of this book here: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


message 31: by Chrys (new) - added it

Chrys Fey (chrysfey) Ronel wrote: "You can check out my 2018 review of this book here: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show..."

Thanks for sharing your review!


Michael (hainish710) | 1 comments Wrote this review nearly 9 months ago. It's not particularly good, but it is what it is: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...

1 - Same place every day: at a rickety desk in a tiny attic room of a tiny flat.

2 - For me, the theme is the most important element. I always find myself thinking bigger than the individual, something I may pay for at a later date. But still, a bland character can destroy a good theme. In a way I think that character and theme should be linked together.

3 - Whoever mentioned coffee here is spot on, particularly for the first draft. It passed by in a caffeine induced haze in which I think words were randomly punched into my keyboard.

4 - Fossils to be discovered, nice. But sometimes writing feels like walking aimlessly down a dark corridor full of closed doors: there's an obvious path ahead, but sometimes ideas just burst out of nowhere. No digging, no thinking. And not always while writing the bloody thing.

5 - At Uni, I started 'It', was engrossed, got near to the end, then had to stop because I was behind with my assignments. King's great though. Ashamed I never finished it. As for On Writing, it should be a must read for all writers. Bradbury's Zen in the Art of Writing equally so. King's is pragmatic, Bradbury's is whimsical, both are vital.


message 33: by Toi, Book Club Admin (new) - rated it 5 stars

Toi Thomas (toithomas) | 103 comments Thanks for sharing your review and thoughts. I like your quote at the end "King's is pragmatic, Bradbury's is whimsical, both are vital."


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