Lolita Lolita question


121 views
Which Nabokov should I read next?


Glad to see other people appreciate Lolita as I did. I wrote a review I am proud of if anyone wants to like it! How about Speak, Memory? If you love Nabokov, you will find this memoir interesting. I also liked Bend Sinister, as it has a lot to do with Nabokov's view on dictatorship government.


Lee (last edited Nov 21, 2014 08:36AM ) Oct 29, 2014 11:16AM   0 votes
I read Pnin a few years back and I was surprised at how funny it was although there is certainly much to amuse us in Lolita as well. Nabokov is scathing in his portrayal of academic life in America. Professor Pnin teaches Russian literature to a handful of students at a small eastern college. He is referenced in Pale Fire so it would make a good companion to that novel.
I've just finished King, Queen, Knave and thoroughly enjoyed it. Thanks to those of you making these suggestions for further explorations of Nabokov.


Been reading Nabokov for over 20 years now, he's surgically precise in his mastery of style. The older Russian works which he and his son "Englished" (their word, they eschewed "translations") are just great, full of 1920's and 30's details, events, mores...King, Queen, Knave is wonderful, Glory is great, and Mary is a favorite for me because of the explorations of memory/nostalgia...you can tell Mary is his first novel, though. The short stories from this period shine too, try Torpid Smoke and The Vane Sisters. Enjoy the journey, Monica!


Harvey (last edited Oct 29, 2014 06:32PM ) Oct 27, 2014 07:03PM   0 votes
King, Queen, Knave is awfully good.

I can't post again, so I'm editing to say that I agree Pnin is funny and quite good, though it feels a bit conventional compared to some of Nabokov's other work. But it's not as conventional as it seems at first glance: there's a first-person narrator who doesn't make an appearance until well into the novel.

I love Bend Sinister except for that smart-aleck "cheat" ending. And yes, Speak, Memory is certainly a must read for any Nabokov fan.

I'm a big fan of Transparent Things, though it's probably not for everyone. I love the rather sad mood. It's a ghost story (at least in a sense).


back to top