Stephen White - Alan Gregory discussion

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message 1: by Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl, Colorful Colorado (new)

Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl (dustpancrazy) | 786 comments Mod
I moved to Boulder in 2006 and soon afterward got hooked on Stephen White's series set in my new hometown. I immediately found I could relate to the characters and the setting. It has been fun to read the Alan Gregory novels and know so familiarly the locations described in the stories. Our family moved in April 2009 - just one exit outside of Boulder on "the turnpike", we are still in Boulder County and we are still close to Spanish Hills, where the fictional Gregory Family lives. I now live just on the outside of the "doughnut" that is described below:

"Tucked into the western edge of the valley is a town that is so full of contradictions that it is hard to believe it is the work of so much planning. Prescient leadership has left the city of Boulder as the hole in one of the most appetizing geographical urban doughnuts anywhere. The town, peculiar in so many amusing ways, is surrounded by pristine greenbelts stretching as far as my eyes can see."
-Dead Time (2008) Dead Time (Book 16) by Stephen White


message 2: by Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl, Colorful Colorado (new)

Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl (dustpancrazy) | 786 comments Mod
Gosh, I miss Boulder! I want those multi-use paths back - I'm tired of driving all the time - in boulder there is this integrated multi-use system where you can walk, run or bike anywhere - it goes under roads and follows creeks. The paths are named after the creeks - Boulder Creek Path, Bear Creek Path, Goose Creek , Skunk Creek etc. There are also buses that go on all the main roads with creative names like: Skip, Hop, Jump, Long Jump, Bound, etc . There's really no reason to own a car in Boulder. Bikes are very popular and in the neighborhood we used to live in (Martin Acres aka Martian Acres) many people converted their garages into living space.

Even as close as we are to Boulder - there's just this different feeling in Boulder. We might move back within a year if we can find a house that meets our needs and is within our rental limits - housing costs are outrageous in Boulder because the city is not gonna expand out any further (open space surrounds the city).

We drive both our kids to two different Boulder schools and I still do my shopping at Table Mesa Shopping Center and use the Boulder Public Library... I might as well live there!


message 3: by Jan C (new)

Jan C (woeisme) | 119 comments I think I've only been to Boulder once. I had a training session for work there. It was okay.

It seemed like a typical university town to me. Maybe they were a little more toward the environment. But it didn't really seem that different from Evanston (Northwestern), IL.

Of course, I didn't mix in with the general population that much.


message 4: by Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl, Colorful Colorado (new)

Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl (dustpancrazy) | 786 comments Mod
There are some quirky things about the place...you can read about a lot of them in the Alan Gregory series. Like every year at Halloween, there is a naked run where people put a pumpkin on their head and run down the street near Pearl Street I think. I think it was last year that they tried to crack down on this event - cops chased the naked runners and made arrests with some that they caught - kinda took the fun out of it. There is also a similar event where people ride bikes through town naked.


message 5: by Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl, Colorful Colorado (new)

Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl (dustpancrazy) | 786 comments Mod
In Boulder as in Life ... "truth is stranger than the fiction."


message 6: by Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl, Colorful Colorado (new)

Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl (dustpancrazy) | 786 comments Mod
check this website out... it needs to be updated but it's still pretty good.

http://keepboulderweird.org/


message 7: by Jan C (new)

Jan C (woeisme) | 119 comments Ok there are some differences.

In the midwest we generally prefer to leave our clothes on when we are out of doors. We do have the Polar Bear Club where people jump into Lake Michigan. They don't generally stay very long, though.

And we do have a St. Patrick's Day Parade, actually we have two of them. Neither of which generally occur actually St. Patrick's Day - we have to have parades on the weekends now. And they dye the river green. And the plumbers' union went to Dublin to show them how to dye the river green.

And I think they still have a rubber duck race on the river.


message 8: by Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl, Colorful Colorado (new)

Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl (dustpancrazy) | 786 comments Mod
Sounds like they know how to make things fun in Illinois too! :-) btw, I wasn't trying to say "my town is weirder than your town" or anything - I hope it didn't come across that way too much. I know there are strange events everywhere , it just seems there are a extremely high concentration of these things in Boulder.
Of course, I also moved here from Utah - where there isn't much diversity.

Yesterday I found out that the house we have been renting in Superior, CO has been sold and the new owners want us out by the time the house closes - so I may just be moving back to Boulder sooner than I had thought.

Anyway, thanks for sharing the "weird" things from your neck of the woods.


message 9: by Jan C (new)

Jan C (woeisme) | 119 comments I was just in that situation. I lived in a 13-story apartment building just off the Lake. They got new owners and decided to chuck everybody out so that they could renovate.We had four months to find a new place to live and to be out of the building. Whew, that was stressful. Lost about 10 lbs.

A lot of people stayed in the neighborhood, moved down the street. I didn't want to be near my old building. So I found a slightly apartment (but in a basement) for less money back home in Evanston. About 5 blocks from where I grew up.


message 10: by Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl, Colorful Colorado (last edited Oct 08, 2009 07:20PM) (new)

Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl (dustpancrazy) | 786 comments Mod
well, we knew the house was for sale when we started renting and we haven't even been here 6 months - the house is wheelchair accessible. My wife has a physical disability (another reason I can relate to the Alan Gregory series - Alan's wife, Lauren has MS and yet they have children, careers etc). We have until the end of November to find a new house. I figure I'll start house hunting next week.

Hopefully, we'll find a house in Boulder that'll work for us - if not we'll probably end up in one of the L's. The L's are where you end up if you can't afford Boulder - Lafayette, Louisville, Lyons or Longmont (Longmont is out of the question - Longmont residents and Boulder Residents don't get along especially well. The Boulder County Fairgrounds is in Longmont - Longmont is outside of the Boulder County School District). We've got our kids in good schools so we're gonna stay in the Boulder County School District.


message 11: by Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl, Colorful Colorado (new)

Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl (dustpancrazy) | 786 comments Mod
I'm moving to Lafayette in mid-November - just couldn't make Boulder happen :-) but it's okay. Hope to get another copy of The Siege soon so I can finish reading it.


message 12: by Jan C (new)

Jan C (woeisme) | 119 comments So it sounds like you'll still be in the Boulder area.

Is The Siege good so far?


message 13: by Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl, Colorful Colorado (new)

Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl (dustpancrazy) | 786 comments Mod
Boulder County - I can get on the "Jump" and go to Boulder :-)

I got half-way through The Seige and it was really getting good, but I made the mistake of waiting to start the book too close to the 3 week due date :-(


message 14: by Jan C (new)

Jan C (woeisme) | 119 comments That's the trouble with the library.


message 15: by Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl, Colorful Colorado (new)

Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl (dustpancrazy) | 786 comments Mod
Yeah. I can't afford to actually buy books anymore so I have to wait my time :-) We do have a great library system though and with the inter-library loan program I can get most titles pretty easily. I'm excited that my new home will be walking distance to the Lafayette Public Library - that's definitely a plus!


message 16: by Jan C (new)

Jan C (woeisme) | 119 comments I grew up half a block from a branch of the Evanston Library. So I know what you mean. I need to go down there, now that I have moved back, and get me a library card.


message 17: by Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl, Colorful Colorado (new)

Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl (dustpancrazy) | 786 comments Mod
Bumper stickers I recently saw on a vehicle in Boulder County:

"I brake for Prairie Dogs"
"Who Cares? We Care! Citizens for Prairie Dogs"


message 18: by Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl, Colorful Colorado (last edited Nov 25, 2009 11:19AM) (new)

Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl (dustpancrazy) | 786 comments Mod
11/18/2009

Bo Shaffer packs dry ice around the steel coffin containing the frozen body of Bredo Morstoel in a shed in Nederland on Wednesday. Shaffer has been taking care of Morstoel’s frozen body for 15 years. Colorado Hometown News Group/Richard M. Hackett

20 Years On Ice:
Nederland’s Frozen Dead Guy reaches double-decade anniversary

By Scott Rochat
Colorado Hometown News Group

It’s been 20 years this week since the Guy became Dead and Frozen. And yes, he’s still in the Tuff Shed.

Bo Shaffer ought to know. He’s still heading up there each month to pile dry ice on the casket.

“Let’s see how the old boy is today,” Shaffer said Wednesday, unlocking the shed and opening the insulated box. Inside, the frosty steel coffin sits at about 90 degrees below zero — not bad, considering it’s been five weeks since the ice was topped off.

The Tuff Shed, as every Nederlander knows, is the last resting place of Norwegian civil servant Bredo Morstoel, who died of heart failure 20 years ago Friday. Morstoel’s grandson, former Nederland resident Trygve Bauge, decided to have grandpa packed in dry ice and shipped to the United States to be preserved cryonically.

The act drew international attention and ended up spinning off a new town festival — Frozen Dead Guy Days in early March, complete with coffin racing and plunges into icy water. (It also spun off a new town ordinance forbidding bodies to be stored on a residential property, but Morstoel was — ahem — grandfathered in.)

Morstoel’s preserved body spent a few years in California before coming to Nederland. Shaffer’s been keeping it cool for 15 years now, hauling up about 1,500 pounds of dry ice every four weeks in the summer or five weeks in the winter.

It’s not free. Bauge sends about $800 a month from Norway to cover the costs — funded by his mother’s pension — and the price tag used to be higher before the property’s mortgage was paid off about two years ago.

“I look at it as we’re funded by a grant from Norway and it provides jobs for Americans,” Shaffer joked.

The casket originally rested in an ordinary (and soon wind-damaged) garden shed before a Denver radio station and Tuff Shed donated the current shelter. Tuff Shed even repainted the building two years ago, since it’s been something of a PR boost for the company.

The question may be what happens when Bauge’s mother dies and the “grant” runs out. Plan B, Shaffer said, is to go to the Nederland Chamber of Commerce for support (since Frozen Dead Guy Days now draws about 15,000 people to town), while Plan C is to make an Internet appeal for funds.

Meanwhile, Shaffer’s having fun. He’s working on a book about his experiences, tentatively called “The Iceman Chronicles.” On Wednesday, he even chilled a little champagne near the casket for a celebration. Not too long a chill, mind you — one year’s overly frozen toast to Grandpa sent the cork ricocheting around the shed.

And for the next 20 years? How about politics?

“We’re thinking of running Bredo for town council and arrange a Ouija board type of thing for him,” Shaffer joked. “He’d vote yes or no, not a lot of debate ... just a council member doing his job.”

Source: Lafayette News
http://www.coloradohometownnews.com/n...


message 19: by Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl, Colorful Colorado (new)

Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl (dustpancrazy) | 786 comments Mod
THE TRUE STORY, YES IT IS ALL TRUE,,,,
Grandpa Bredo is soon to be 109 years old. For years, he’s
taken up residence in a Tuff Shed in the hills above Nederland,
Colorado, where he remains very, very, very cold. More
specifically, Grandpa is frozen in a state of suspended
animation, awaiting the big thaw. The one that will bring him
back to life.
There is a good story behind this, one that stretches from
Norway to California to Colorado, involving cryonics,
deportation, psychics, celebrations, and a dedicated Ice Man. It’s a tale that has captured
international attention and sparked a must-attend annual event called Frozen Dead Guy Days.
So how did all of this begin… and more importantly (particularly for Grandpa Bredo), how long
will it last?
Life After Death
Before Grandpa Bredo Morstoel died from a heart condition in 1989, he enjoyed a comfortable
life in Norway, where he was born and raised. He loved painting, fishing, skiing, and hiking in
the mountains of his homeland. He was also the director of parks and recreation in Norway’s
Baerum County for more than 30 years.
After he died, things got really interesting. Instead of a burial, he was packed in dry ice and
prepared for international travel. First, he was shipped to the Trans Time cryonics facility in
Oakland, California, where he was placed in liquid nitrogen for almost four years. Then, he was
moved to Colorado in 1993 to stay with his daughter Aud Morstoel and his grandson Trygve
Bauge, both strong advocates for cryonics who hoped to start a facility of their own.
There he stayed for years under cold cover, in a shed, near his grandson’s home, and about to be
left on his own due to some pesky visa issues.
The Grandfather Clause
If you peruse the laws of Nederland, you’ll discover that it’s illegal to store a frozen human or
animal (or any body part thereof) in your home. We have Grandpa Bredo to thank for this. When
grandson Trygve was deported in the mid-90s because of an expired visa, Bredo’s daughter
stepped in to take care of the household – including keeping her father on ice.
Soon, Aud was evicted for living in a house with no electricity or plumbing and was about to
head back to Norway. This meant that the family’s fledgling cryonics facility was destined to
come to a halt. Worried that her father would thaw out before his time, she spoke to a local
reporter, who spoke to the Nederland city council, who passed Section 7-34 of the municipal
code regarding the "keeping of bodies."
Luckily for Bredo, he was grandfathered in and allowed to stay. Suddenly, he was a worldwide
media sensation. And he has been well cared for by his family and community ever since.
The Iceman Cometh, Monthly
Bo Shaffer saw an intriguing want ad on the Internet in 1995 posted by Trygve. He applied for
the one-of-a-kind job, got it, and is now known as the “Ice Man.” Every month, Shaffer and a
team of volunteers delivers 1,600 pounds of dry ice and packs it around Grandpa Bredo in his
sarcophagus, surrounded by foam padding, a tarp, and blankets. As Cryonicist-in-Charge,
Shaffer keeps Grandpa at a steady -60 degrees Fahrenheit. He also gives tours to investigators,
filmmakers, local volunteers, and even psychics who have purported to communicate with the
dearly departed (by one account, Bredo is amused by the fuss but doing fine).
Shaffer feels the weight of this responsibility, knowing how much has been invested in keeping
Grandpa in his cryonic state. Now frozen for 20 years, he is keeping the hope alive for his
family and their faith in cryonics, as well as spurring an annual festival in Nederland that has
grown into a full-fledged winter celebration.
It’s a Dead Man’s Party
For a town like Nederland that thrives on the colorful, the offbeat, and the weird, Frozen Dead
Guy Days is a fitting way to end the short days of winter and head into the melting snows of
spring. Trygve Bauge calls it “Cryonics’ first Mardi Gras.”
The community experiences a new burst of life with the festival’s creative contests, icy events
(including coffin racing, polar plunging, frozen salmon tossing) basically if it is fun and can be
done in the cold, it goes! People come from around the world every March to experience the
legacy of Grandpa Bredo – even representatives of cryonics organizations who want share the
science behind this unique story.
Nowadays, when Grandpa Bredo celebrates, he doesn’t celebrate alone. Every year, loyal souls
go to the Tuff Shed on the hill to have a drink with Colorado’s best-known corpse, marking the
passage of years.
20 years on ice,,,,,
This year marked Bredo's twentieth on ice and the festival now going into its eight year is never
short on intrigue, controversy and just plain fun!
Named by the Chicago Tribune in 2007 as one the country's top 100 festivals not to be missed.
Video footage of the FDGD has graced the networks on many broadcasts including Bill Guiest's
segment on the CBS Sunday Morning Show, the Tonight Show with Jay Leno, CNN, ABC
news, PBS features, the Game Show Network and a Belgium Realty Show (who came and
filmed a full episode at FDGD). The festival has also been "immortalized" by two international
award-winning documentaries, "Grandpa's In The Tuff Shed" and "Grandpa's Still In The Tuff
Shed" by the Beeck Sisters. Media coverage has been and continues to be extensive and world
wide.

The 2oth Annual Frozen Dead Guy Days is March 5-7th, 2010! Don't miss it!


message 20: by Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl, Colorful Colorado (last edited Feb 11, 2010 09:27PM) (new)

Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl (dustpancrazy) | 786 comments Mod
the official FDGD Logo :-)


message 21: by Maicie (new)

Maicie Great site, Dustin. I went to school in the Republic of Boulder. Great memories. During high school I worked in the food hall at Chautauqua. They used to show movies outside against the side of the building.

And wouldn't miss FDGD...lots of Fat Tire beer! I wonder if they'll have enough snow for the coffin races? No matter. I could hang out at Kathmandu all day eating good food and drinking Chai. Maybe I'll see you there.


message 22: by Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl, Colorful Colorado (new)

Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl (dustpancrazy) | 786 comments Mod
Maicie wrote: "Maybe I'll see you there. "

Honestly, I probably won't be there :-) I've never been and with the kids, we're pretty selective about what we attempt to do. I've actually only driven through Nederland once, but I love to promote all things weird in and around Boulder :-) Now, I live in Lafayette, so I feel a little out of the loop (I lived in Boulder for 2 1/2 yrs - just couldn't find the house that we needed and could afford) but my kids are still in school in Boulder so I'm kinda there...

My daughter's preschool in Boulder teaches that "Prairie Dogs and Buffaloes are Native to Boulder". Well, no doubt about those prairie dogs is there? I think they would be the unofficial mascot of Boulder - they're even featured on more than one multi-use path underpass in mural and etching :-) As far as Buffaloes mainly I've seen them on the CU-Boulder Campus and they radiate out from there :-)


message 23: by Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl, Colorful Colorado (last edited Feb 15, 2010 02:33PM) (new)

Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl (dustpancrazy) | 786 comments Mod
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB12569...
Wall Street Journal reports that Boulder's Naked Pumpkin Run may be coming to an end :-(

BOULDER, Colo. -- This city has always taken pride in its liberal-to-the-point-of-loony reputation. But this Halloween, one of its wackiest traditions is under siege: the Naked Pumpkin Run.
[A pumpkin runner:]

A pumpkin runner

The event is exactly what its name implies. Scores of men and women pour into downtown streets for a late-night jog, wearing not a stitch between the jack-o'-lanterns on their heads and the sneakers on their feet.

For nearly a decade, naked pumpkin runners did their thing unmolested, stampeding through the frigid dark past crowds of admirers who hooted, hollered and tossed candy. But last year the run attracted more than 150 participants, and Police Chief Mark Beckner fears things are getting out of hand. "It's a free-for-all," he says.

So he intends to stop it.

He will station more than 40 officers on the traditional four-block route tonight, with two SWAT teams patrolling nearby. All have orders to arrest gourd-topped streakers as sex offenders.

Runners and their fans are outraged. This is not the free-spirited Boulder they know and love. "It kind of reminds me of what's happening in Tehran," says Andy Schmidt, a lawyer. "They're pre-emptively outlawing a gathering."

The American Civil Liberties Union has fired off a letter accusing the police of violating citizens' constitutional rights to express whatever it is they're expressing when they slip hollowed-out pumpkins over their heads and race buck naked down the Pearl Street pedestrian mall.

View Full Image
pumpkin
Sammy Dallal/The Daily Camera

Participants carved pumpkins in preparation for the 2007 Naked Pumpkin Run.
pumpkin
pumpkin

The annual rite "seems somewhat quixotic," concedes Judd Golden, chairman of the ACLU's Boulder County chapter, "but our Bill of Rights does not judge the content of free expression."

At a recent forum for city council candidates, all 10 participants said they disapproved of the threatened crackdown.

Even Mayor Matt Appelbaum, who supports the police, admits to a tinge of worry that arresting Halloween streakers will tarnish Boulder's reputation as, well, Boulder.

"I'm a little old for it, but it could be pretty cool to be running around with a pumpkin on your head and not much else," says the 57-year-old mayor.

As for the runners themselves, they're stressing. Do they hand the cops a victory by staying home? Fashion a zucchini codpiece to stay legal? Let it all hang out?

Oleg Abramov, a 31-year-old planetary scientist, says it's an excruciating choice. He loves the run; he calls it a "liberating and somewhat surreal community arts project." But being labeled a sex offender could ruin his career.

He won't divulge his plans for tonight, except to say that if he does run, he plans to "have a lawyer standing by."

View Full Image
pumpkin
Joshua Lawton/The Daily Camera

From left, Andrea DuBay, Liz Kassab and Teresa Ayandele posed for a photo with a participant in the 2008 run at the corner of Pearl and Ninth streets in downtown Boulder.
pumpkin
pumpkin

Last year, in a first tentative move against the pumpkin runners, police ticketed a dozen participants, including Mr. Abramov. The Pumpkin 12, as they became known, all had the charges against them dropped or reduced to disorderly conduct in exchange for a few hours' community service.

This year, police plan to make a stronger statement. They are on edge not just about the pumpkin run but also about an outdoor costume party that could draw thousands of rowdy revelers to the pedestrian mall. So this time, officers won't mess around with handing out tickets; they expect to make arrests.

"We're a police department," Chief Beckner says. "We enforce the law."

Whether the law applies to naked pumpkin runners is a matter of some dispute.

It's not illegal to be naked in downtown Boulder. In fact, the city has had a long, proud history of nudity.

Hundreds of University of Colorado students dashed across campus in the buff in 1974, in a vain attempt to set a Guinness World Record.

More recently, Boulder has played host to an annual Naked Bike Ride to protest dependence on fossil fuels. And the Boulder Daily Camera, the local newspaper, serves up a steady stream of stories about clothes-free joggers and nudist gardeners.

Casting about for a law to apply, since nudity per se is not illegal, police hit upon the state's indecent exposure statute, which makes it a Class 1 misdemeanor for anyone to knowingly expose his or her genitals in circumstances "likely to cause affront or alarm."

View Full Image
pumpkin
Sammy Dallal/The Daily Camera

Jack-o-lantern heads obscured the identities of these two participants in the 2007 run.
pumpkin
pumpkin

Given that the Naked Pumpkin Run starts at 11 p.m., long after young trick-or-treaters have retired, and given that the route is packed with fans who come out specifically to see the event, runners argue that it's absurd to think their prank is causing either affront or alarm.

Even if the run does catch a few people by surprise, "the joy it brings overall far outweighs the one or two people who could be offended," says Callie Webster, who is 22 and a veteran pumpkinhead.

Police acknowledge they have not been flooded with pumpkin-run-related complaints, but say that's beside the point. A throng of naked people with jack-o-lanterns on their heads is, by definition, an alarming sight, Chief Beckner says. Therefore, it's illegal.

Those convicted of indecent exposure rarely get jail time, but they must register as sex offenders, just as rapists do. Which seems a bit excessive to Boulder County District Attorney Stan Garnett.

"A lot of times," he says with a sigh, "these people are just being idiots."

Still, Mr. Garnett says he will back up the police, adding, "We will take the cases they give us."

The looming threat has scrambled planning for the pumpkin run, which is loosely organized even in the best of years. (This being Boulder, the only hard-and-fast rule is that participants must put their pumpkins into a compost heap after the run.)

An unidentified man ran along Boulder's Pearl Street at the start of the 2008 run.
pumpkin
pumpkin

Roane Buja, a 22-year-old senior at the University of Colorado, says she is debating running while partially covered up -- but fears that would kill the sense of exhilaration she felt last year from no-holds-barred exhibitionism.

"It was very playful," she says, adding with a hint of indignation, "There was no aspect of sexual debauchery."

But Ms. Buja knows a jury might not see it her way, and she can't risk a conviction as a sex offender. "I'm going into education," she says, "and I don't know that's necessarily the best thing to have on my record."

With so many runners spooked, some organizers are quietly planning to outflank the police by taking their pumpkins elsewhere. Come nightfall, they intend to doff their clothes and don their gourds in a nearby, unnamed but presumably less prudish city. A restaurant called Hapa Sushi offers an alternative for those who remain loyal to Boulder: It's handing out free orange undies, including barely-there thongs, imprinted with the slogan "Run Responsibly."

The Naked Pumpkin Run is not for everyone. It's hot and smelly and goopy inside the jack-o'-lanterns. Even hollowed out, the pumpkins can weigh 25 to 30 pounds, so they are heavy and tough to balance; veteran runners learn to carve big ears that can double as handles.

And it's usually quite chilly in Colorado on Halloween, so running around naked takes a good deal of fortitude. The Saturday forecast is for a low of 35 degrees, with two feet of snow on the ground. Still, those who have tried it say it's addictive. "It's wild. It's crazy," said one organizer, who hopes to evade police scrutiny by giving only his nom de gourd, Captain Cold. "And it gives you bragging rights for the entire year."


message 24: by Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl, Colorful Colorado (new)

Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl (dustpancrazy) | 786 comments Mod
http://www.hot-springs-ar-info.com/ho...
2009 Article
Hot Springs, AR defends that they have the shortest St.Patrick's Day parade not Boulder. Both Parades are less than one block long :-)


message 25: by Christine (new)

Christine | 207 comments Keep the weird and the wacky stories coming. I plan to forward the story about the Frozen Dead Guy Days to my daughter who is college in Utah. The next thing I will know she will be on her way to Nederland. I read that article in the WSJ about the Naked Pumpkin Run. The crazy part is putting the hollowed out pumpkin on your head, not the being naked, anyone can be naked! It all sounds fun!


message 26: by Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl, Colorful Colorado (new)

Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl (dustpancrazy) | 786 comments Mod
Christine wrote: "Keep the weird and the wacky stories coming. I plan to forward the story about the Frozen Dead Guy Days to my daughter who is college in Utah. The next thing I will know she will be on her way to..."

In one of the Alan Gregory books, part of the story took place on Pearl Street on Halloween - I would never dare to go there on Halloween - I don't want to get trampled! I do however enjoy The Boulder Creek Festival. I'll keep posting stories - I'm glad people are enjoying them :-)

Boulder is a fun place to live but it's damn expensive! I already posted earlier about how we were trying to find a house that would work for us in Boulder - we almost did but the house was so much smaller, older than what we found here in Lafayette and we would have had to make significant modifications to the house because my wife uses a wheelchair. The view was great though :-)and I don't like commuting to Boulder but the house and yard here is just so much more spacious - I love my new home (we are just renting) but it's not Boulder :-) I'd like to take classes at Naropa University in Boulder but can't afford it :-)

Boulder is also a fun place to visit. Your daughter is in school in Utah? I'm guessing you really meant Utah and not Colorado - If so, which school, I'm from Utah - I know Utah :-)


message 27: by Christine (new)

Christine | 207 comments Boulder may be expensive but I live near San Francisco so I think I may have you beat with housing costs. How far is Lafayette from Boulder?

Yes, she is in Utah but she is a skier and often travels different places for snow and fun. She's going to Westminster College in Salt Lake City. Do you know of it?


message 28: by Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl, Colorful Colorado (new)

Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl (dustpancrazy) | 786 comments Mod
Christine wrote: "Boulder may be expensive but I live near San Francisco so I think I may have you beat with housing costs. How far is Lafayette from Boulder?

Yes, she is in Utah but she is a skier and often trave..."


Westminster College .... I really like that school but I couldn't afford it - it's a private college :-) Another good school I like in Utah is Weber State

Lafayette is a whole 11 miles from Boulder. A commute takes 20-25 minutes. I usually travel up South Boulder Road so I go right past Spanish Hills where Alan Gregory supposedly lives :-)


message 29: by Christine (new)

Christine | 207 comments Yes, Westminster is a private college and thankfully because of her grades, she has a really good scholarship. Thankfully! Its pretty exciting right now, 14 students from Westmini are at the Olympics. We were just in SLC. We went thru Ogden on our way home from Snow Basin and I saw where Weber State was. My daughter looked at it but decided against it because it was more of a commuter school. Not many kids lived on campus and that leads to lonely weekends for a kid from California.

Eleven miles is not too bad of a commute. Is it a pretty drive? I am sure that it is better than here, most days its bumper to bumper on the freeway.


message 30: by Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl, Colorful Colorado (new)

Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl (dustpancrazy) | 786 comments Mod
It's really not that bad of a commute... I just got spoiled. In Boulder you can get around without even having a vehicle - you can bike, walk, or ride the bus anywhere around town. Then last April we moved to Superior - that was only one exit outside of Boulder on the Turnpike (Hwy 36) It took only 10 minutes to get to my kid's schools either by driving or taking the B bus that goes from Denver to Boulder. Now, if the weather is bad it can be a 45 minute drive from Lafayette to Boulder - We had several days of bad weather and roads in December and one recently.

There are actually some nice views :-) If I drive up South Boulder Road , I go through Louisville. In Louisville there is a Hill I drive up and when I get to the top there are the Flatirons and there's a great view of the Boulder Valley. If I go up Baseline, there is a nice lake right off of Baseline. Baseline, South Boulder Road, and Arapahoe are all Boulder Roads that extend down to Lafayette.


message 31: by Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl, Colorful Colorado (new)

Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl (dustpancrazy) | 786 comments Mod
Christine wrote: "Eleven miles is not too bad of a commute. Is it a pretty drive? I am sure that it is better than here, most days its bumper to bumper on the freeway.
"


I could never deal with California freeway traffic. Driving Downtown Denver is more than enough for me (I avoid it whenever possible). I have always preferred rural small towns :-) unless I don't have to drive - like in Boulder.




message 32: by Christine (new)

Christine | 207 comments I'm envious. It sounds beautiful. Boulder sounds like a great place to live. I like the fact that you don't have to drive when you want to go somewhere. Some day I would like to live outside of the Bay Area, where the pace is slower and life, at least seems simpler. Maybe it would allow me to read more. I would also love to work in a small bookstore




message 33: by Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl, Colorful Colorado (new)

Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl (dustpancrazy) | 786 comments Mod
There are a lot of small independent bookstores in Boulder :-) The most popular is of course The Boulder Bookstore on Pearl Street. There is also the big chains - Borders and a huge renovated Barnes & Noble, both near Twenty-Ninth Street. If you plan to relocate, you should seriously consider Boulder :-)


message 35: by Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl, Colorful Colorado (new)

Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl (dustpancrazy) | 786 comments Mod
I've got to call it a night :-) I'll post in Manner of Death and hopefully also Still Life (but don't hold your breath)threads tomorrow.


message 36: by Christine (new)

Christine | 207 comments Boulder Bookstore looks like my kind of store. I could spend hours in a place like that.

I'll look for your posts tomorrow.


message 37: by Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl, Colorful Colorado (last edited May 25, 2010 08:34AM) (new)

Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl (dustpancrazy) | 786 comments Mod
IT'S MEMORIAL DAY WEEKEND IN BOULDER,COLORADO!
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BOULDER CREEK FESTIVAL - Saturday May 29th - Monday May 31st - The unofficial beginning of summer!

Bolder Boulder Run
Boulder Creek Festival
Farmer's Market
Rubber Duck Race


http://www.bceproductions.com/boulder...


message 38: by Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl, Colorful Colorado (last edited May 25, 2010 08:44AM) (new)

Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl (dustpancrazy) | 786 comments Mod
BOLDERBOULDER Race is on Memorial Day - Monday May 31st! Click below for info:
http://www.bolderboulder.com/Homepage...


message 39: by Shirley (new)

Shirley (dwyatt1) | 6 comments Thanks for the Invite but I have to work :-(.


message 40: by Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl, Colorful Colorado (new)

Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl (dustpancrazy) | 786 comments Mod
Welcome to Banjo Billy’s Bus Tours

Saddle-up for 90 Minutes of Unforgettable Stories!

Banjo Billy’s Bus Tour gives history tours of Boulder and Denver Colorado from an old school bus tricked out to look like a traveling hillbilly shack. Hear ghost tales, crime stories, and history while sitting on a couch, recliner or saddle as the bus rolls through the core of the cities. You won’t forget this bus tour!

Although the bus follows the same route every time, no two tours are alike. Passengers get to vote at multiple stops for what they want to hear about – whether it’s a ghost story, a bizarre tall tale, or historical facts. The tour is 90 minutes long, but we guess you’ll be hoping for more.

http://www.banjobilly.com

This is a fun bus tour - I've only been on the bus once but the experience was very memorable. You can choose between a saddle seat or cushy sofas/rocking chairs. There is a disco ball and strings of lights. Ghost and history stories. A ride on Banjo Billy's bus is an essential part of the Boulder experience.


message 41: by Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl, Colorful Colorado (last edited Jul 13, 2010 10:07AM) (new)

Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl (dustpancrazy) | 786 comments Mod
The Boulder Creek and the Boulder Creek Path run beneath it....

The Boulder Public Library is located between Arapahoe & Canyon just off Broadway. It's easy walking distance to Central Park where the Boulder Creek Festival is held every Memorial Day Weekend and the Hometown Fair is held every Labor Day Weekend.

Near the entrance to the library, you can deposit your books in a nifty high-tech book return with a conveyor belt (it freaked me out the first time :-)

A great place for meetings and free events such as concerts, the library also has an on-going, ever changing art display.

Until last year there was also a coffee shop on the library bridge. The bridge spans over the Boulder Creek and connects the main portion of the library (the Arapahoe side - where the books are) to the large auditorium and art gallery side near the Canyon side.

With it's iconic glass entrance, The Boulder Public Library stands out as a beloved piece in Boulder's diverse architectural collection.
http://www.boulderlibrary.org/


message 42: by Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl, Colorful Colorado (new)

Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl (dustpancrazy) | 786 comments Mod
It's Hot Outside! You need some Boulder Ice Cream!

Boulder Ice Cream started making ice cream in 1992 on the Pearl Street Mall in Boulder, Colorado. The homemade, all natural ice cream became popular almost overnight and on weekends, there was often a 20 minute wait just to get in the door.

In 1997, Boulder Ice Cream lost its lease on the famous mall, but found a new home near 28th and Canyon. Shortly after the move, the company started producing ice cream for local restaurants and grocery stores.

Whole Foods Market was the first store to ask for the Boulder Ice Cream pints on the shelves in their new Boulder store. So, in February 1998, the first Boulder Ice Cream pints appeared on grocery shelves in Whole Foods Market, Ideal Market and Leever’s Market. Shortly thereafter, the super-creamy ice cream was found in King Soopers, Albertson’s and Wild Oats Markets!

Today, Boulder Ice Cream is available in grocery stores in 9 states in the Western and Southwestern US.
http://www.bouldericecream.com/company


message 43: by Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl, Colorful Colorado (new)

Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl (dustpancrazy) | 786 comments Mod
The Unofficial end to Summer will once again be marked by the Boulder Creek Hometown Fair held in Central Park, Labor Day Weekend. Don't miss the fun, including The Great Zuchinni Race!
http://www.bceproductions.com/hometow...


message 44: by Jan C (new)

Jan C (woeisme) | 119 comments What's with the fire? Or is the media blowing things out of proportion again?


message 45: by Robin (new)

Robin (goodreadscomtriviagoddessl) What exactly do you do with the Zucchini, do you put it on spoons like the egg race, with raw eggs? Inquiring minds want to know.


message 46: by Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl, Colorful Colorado (new)

Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl (dustpancrazy) | 786 comments Mod
Jan C wrote: "What's with the fire? Or is the media blowing things out of proportion again?"

It was bad - I haven't watched the news but it burnt approx 165 structures - the most in Colorado's history, at least that's what I heard. The smoke was really bad and a couple of days was making me sick while I was working inside Borders. Tonight (as I type using Borders Wi-Fi) they are having a Red Cross Benefit concert just outside on Twenty Ninth Street. I don't know all the details but I thought they'd get it under control a lot faster than they did - kinda ruined the big celebration at the Hometown Fair on Labor Day to say the least.


message 47: by Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl, Colorful Colorado (new)

Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl (dustpancrazy) | 786 comments Mod
Robin wrote: "What exactly do you do with the Zucchini, do you put it on spoons like the egg race, with raw eggs? Inquiring minds want to know."

Kids put big wooden wheels on them and decorate them with eyes and pipe cleaners and such. They are raced down a ramp like the Cub Scouts do Pine Wood Derby, But Zuchinnis are not quite as sleek and smooth rolling as Pine Wood Derbies :-)


message 48: by Christine (new)

Christine | 207 comments Did the fire get close to where you live?


message 49: by Jan C (new)

Jan C (woeisme) | 119 comments Dustin Crazy wrote: "Jan C wrote: "What's with the fire? Or is the media blowing things out of proportion again?"

It was bad - I haven't watched the news but it burnt approx 165 structures - the most in Colorado's his..."


It's good that you're okay. I was beginning to get a little concerned when we hadn't heard from you for a while.


message 50: by Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl, Colorful Colorado (new)

Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl (dustpancrazy) | 786 comments Mod
The fire was on the opposite end of town from where I live :-) but thanks for the concern. A lot of people lost their homes. The reason I haven't been online is because my parents came to visit for a week and I spent all my extra time with them. I've decided I need to get online access at home again - really missed being able to be online everyday. I haven't been online for two weeks and I need my reading friends :-)


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