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The Lounge: Chat. Relax. Unwind. > How much do you depend on cell service? What if it failed?

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message 1: by Scout (last edited Apr 11, 2019 09:26PM) (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 5349 comments Here today, Verizon service failed for several hours. People were upset, even panicky. Many small businesses that used to have offices now depend on cell service. Many people have relinquished land lines and only depend on cells. How would failure of service affect you?


message 2: by J.J. (new)

J.J. Mainor | 2145 comments I'm not glued to my phone, so I could do without it for a few hours...of course the loss of service couldn't come at that one time you absolutely have to make a call that can't wait. Obviously it would be a problem if you had to call 911, but general, every day use, it wouldn't affect me at all...


message 3: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 9515 comments Most times, failure of service would barely affect me. More problematic for me is next Tuesday - they are going to do maintenance work on the electricity supply outside my house, so I shall be without electricity while they work this out :-(


message 4: by Kris (new)

Kris Haliday (krishaliday) | 127 comments Scout wrote: "Here today, Verizon service failed for several hours. People were upset, even panicky. Many small businesses that used to have offices now depend on cell service. Many people have relinquished land..."

I'd happily go back to carrier pigeons....


message 5: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 9515 comments Re my last post (not that anyone will be interested) but they scheduled work think about starting at 0900 hrs, so I got into old clothes and ar 0900 hrs I was outside pruning a tree. At 0905 hrs my power lines came down. I came inside and was changing back at 1145 hrs, and by a miracle, the power came back on, and we had a new power post installed and all wired up. Such efficiency is rare, and should be complimented :-)


message 6: by Leonie (new)

Leonie (leonierogers) | 1579 comments We've taken our landline out of the wall. Mostly because it was only used by scammers. So annoying.

We use our mobiles all the time, but I'm sure we could survive without them if required. Might have to go back to dropping in on people to catch up :)


message 7: by Marie (new)

Marie | 562 comments I do not even have a landline in my house as there is no sense paying for two phones. I use my cell for almost everthing. I use it for internet and checking into social media. I also use it for GPS when I travel around to different towns or if I go on trips by car. I don't know what would happen if cell phone service went out for hours on end.


message 8: by Graeme (new)

Graeme Rodaughan Hi Marie. Similar to a zombie apocalypse.


message 9: by Marie (new)

Marie | 562 comments Graeme wrote: "Hi Marie. Similar to a zombie apocalypse."

Yes, basically! lol In all seriousness though, it does make people stop and think about living without their devices and maybe have some kind of plan in place in case of something happening if the phone network went down.


message 10: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 9515 comments This is an interesting economic question here, and it exemplifies the problem of having to make decisions when the future technology is unknown. I have a cell phone, but also land fibre, and I am a fairly heavy user of internet. If I relied solely on cell technology, my monthly bill would get out of hand. I make few actual phone calls, and my cell is mainly used because my daughter sends me texts, and I need something to complain when there is the odd power failure. (Wellington region gets a lot of wind - 120 k wind is far from uncommon, and bits of tree keep breaking lines somewhere.) Apart from GR, my use of social media is only marginally more than during the dark ages. A lot of entertainment and sport is beginning to be streamed and if you want to watch and keep your bill within reason, fibre seems to be the way to go. Perhaps other countries have different pricing??


message 11: by Marie (new)

Marie | 562 comments Ian wrote: "This is an interesting economic question here, and it exemplifies the problem of having to make decisions when the future technology is unknown. I have a cell phone, but also land fibre, and I am a..."

Here in the U.S., pricing of cell phone service varies depending on what service provider people have for their phones. Different companies have different prices. For example, I have a cell phone and I have unlimited data for $45.00 a month. So I can use texting, phone, internet, etc. for just that one price.

Also the more cell phones you have in a family, the more it cost for the service as the companies charge by data usage for each family member. But that can sometimes be combined for a low monthly price as a promotional deal to get families to buy the phones with the service plan. Once the promotional deal runs out though the price sometimes goes up.


message 12: by Kris (new)

Kris Haliday (krishaliday) | 127 comments Ian wrote: "This is an interesting economic question here, and it exemplifies the problem of having to make decisions when the future technology is unknown. I have a cell phone, but also land fibre, and I am a..."

The dark ages... I feel so at home... :-)


message 13: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 13503 comments Our minister of finance proudly counts cell phone revolution to his favor, as in his previous position he managed by introducing new operators to drastically reduce the prices for cell phone communication. For 5 bucks a month I get virtually unlimited calls & text and 10 giga data - more than enough.
Having no cell phone could cause lots of inconvenience. Heck, I remember iphone switching off at minus something Celsius, just when I was tracking my Uber car arriving. There was a moment of semi-panic. I learnt later that it's not only my phone that fails in cold weather..


message 14: by Leonie (new)

Leonie (leonierogers) | 1579 comments Marie wrote: "Ian wrote: "This is an interesting economic question here, and it exemplifies the problem of having to make decisions when the future technology is unknown. I have a cell phone, but also land fibre..."

Your data pricing is enviable!


message 15: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 9515 comments Ours is horrible :-(


message 16: by Leonie (new)

Leonie (leonierogers) | 1579 comments Ian wrote: "Ours is horrible :-("

I can relate!


message 17: by Marie (new)

Marie | 562 comments Nik wrote: "Our minister of finance proudly counts cell phone revolution to his favor, as in his previous position he managed by introducing new operators to drastically reduce the prices for cell phone commun..."

I would love to only have to pay $5 for unlimited call and text with the 10 giga data! Now I feel like I am over paying as I have the 10 giga data too, but I am paying $45. :(


message 18: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 13503 comments Marie wrote: "...but I am paying $45. :( ..."

That's what we paid too a few years back before the increased competition cut the prices drastically.
But don't be envious, unfortunately, cell phone bills is probably the only thing we have here cheap -:)


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