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MISCELLANEOUS TOPICS > POTENTIAL SOLUTIONS to PROBLEMS OF THE WORLD

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message 1: by Denisa (new)


message 2: by Denisa (new)

Denisa Iain wrote: "Denisa wrote: "pedofile rings explained

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HpYYN..."

I started this thread to look more at the world's problem in terms of the eco-system, sustainability and econo..."


Pedofilia (with all other problems) is linked to the people who rule this planet - the richest people who hold all power and all money. From the Bible we know that it is a Devil who is a ruler of this low world and it is obvious that those who worship this creature will sacrifice everything to him. Except for themselves. Not only pedofilia but also sacrificing of children as well as human sacrifices of all kind. Human sacrifices still exist. They are not gone with concentration camps. They have existed in 4th century when all intelectuals of Antiquity were murdered in the name of one "god" and are linked to the reign of Akhenaten or even to Atlantis. Politicians, religious people, scientists, artists, secret societies, they are all involved. Can anybody exterminate all this vermine? Maybe one good, large meteor would be all we really need.


message 3: by Denisa (new)

Denisa a story of a devil tempting Jesus in a desert is well known no matter the version
Again, the devil took him to a very high mountain and showed him all the kingdoms of the world and their splendor. 9 “All this I will give you,” he said, “if you will bow down and worship me.”
it looks like the real master of this material world is the ugly one along with those who worship him and this is the beginning of all other problems. Therefore you cannot expect to make a paradise on earth as it is not possible. All the problems we are facing are the result of greed and lust for power and money of those who rule this world. What can we really do not having resources to meet this challange?
Concerning the meteor hitting Earth, it happened already and it is not impossible to happen again

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Or0S9...

I hope this is a movement that aims toward Good as there is not a lot of good things here.


message 4: by James, Group Founder (last edited May 09, 2019 04:09AM) (new)

James Morcan | 11067 comments Denisa wrote: "a story of a devil tempting Jesus in a desert is well known no matter the version
Again, the devil took him to a very high mountain and showed him all the kingdoms of the world and their splendor. ..."


One problem, in my opinion, with all these "End Times" prophecies in the Big 3 Middle Eastern religions, is they get people fixating on the end of the world...As if it's set in stone... Instead of wondering what might improve the world now to eradicate evils.

In the end, that brainwashing results in a one-track mind towards the "coming Armageddon", and a spirit that there's nothing we can do because it's all been prophesied to all go down hill from here...Which could ultimately be even more evil and demonic and "Devil-like" than present evils of the world.

None of us know which prophecies from the past will come true (if any). Every century in the last 2,000 years people have felt totally sure the End Times have begun, yet they never did.

I vote it's time to focus on solutions.


message 5: by Dan (new)

Dan Gallagher (dan_gallagher) | 6 comments Having studied the major and many minor religions most of my life, I must disagree with James. None of these focus peoples' attention on the end times, though there are sects that do; some Christian fundamentalist groups do. It is Christianity, beyond any others, that focus people's attention on the good News that an infinitely caring savior came and remains, especially in the Eucharist and other sacraments. The fact that the end times were prophesied is among the gifts that the Christ offered; a sign that the human race cannot create redemption on its own; that it needs a savior and will be ultimately saved from its worst inclinations to be reborn in a mysteriously glowing way (ref the Transfiguration). Best to you James, but I hope you will explore the faith that is so lovingly--so self-sacrificingly--offered by God through His Son. For those who seek proof, I offer reference to enough evidence to approach proof, though proof is usually only experienced by one person at a time, deep within: Explore the martyrs, the amazing expansion of Christianity over 300 years in the face of frightening persecution, the Incorruptibles, the apparitions (even before tens of thousands at a time, such as at Fatima and Zeitun, the miracles flowing from minor apparition/locution occurrances over 2,000 years (at Knock, Akita, Betania, Medjugore and in the lives of saints over two millennia, as well as proved miracles touching individual lives (Audrey Marie Santo and many other famous cases). The testamony of millions--yes, millions--who have merely felt the Spirit in their lives but without miracles or evidence of overt miracles are available to read or hear about. Yes, despite the weakness and sins of followers of Christ to leaders within the Church He founded, the Spirit continues at work in missionary activities large and small. Why would anyone bother with attending mass or praying or abandoning their favorite sins? That is the question that, I pray, will lead you and anyone reading this to begin that investigation, that exploration that leads to enlarging the heart for neighbor and God alike; that leads to a reaching into you by God that you would feel and embrace and cause you to know with certainty that you are embraced. May God bless all on that journey.


message 6: by James, Group Founder (new)

James Morcan | 11067 comments Dan wrote: "None of these focus peoples' attention on the end times, though there are sects that do; some Christian fundamentalist groups do...."

Yup. I was commenting on exactly that type of Hell and Brimstone style Christianity and Apocalyptic Islam (think it's in some Orthodox Judaism too?) that is constantly referencing the coming end of the world (as if it will definitely happen for the Biblical prophecies to become a reality). As that was the spirit someone earlier in the thread was posting in, so I replied to that.

I'm aware there are many modern types of Christians and Muslims who take a less literal interpretation of the Bible/Quran and focus on the now rather than the prophesied End Times.


message 7: by Dan (new)

Dan Gallagher (dan_gallagher) | 6 comments Iain wrote: "How Entrepreneurs can Solve the World's Problems

There is no shortage of big problems facing humanity, but there is a shortage of ambitious startups trying to solve them. Far too often talented en..."


Absolutely correct. Example: New plastic that can be adapted to almost all current applications and is not only recyclable, but the process of its recycling is cheaper than making new plastic! https://bgr.com/2019/05/07/fully-recy....


message 8: by Dan (new)

Dan Gallagher (dan_gallagher) | 6 comments James wrote: "Dan wrote: "None of these focus peoples' attention on the end times, though there are sects that do; some Christian fundamentalist groups do...."

Yup. I was commenting on exactly that type of Hell..."


:-)


message 9: by Lance, Group Founder (new)

Lance Morcan | 2715 comments Iain wrote: "How Chile Should Prepare For A Future Without Water

SANTIAGO – Lack of drinking water, disappearing lakes, heat records: every year seems worse than the one before when it comes to drought in Chil..."


Interesting Iain. They say future wars will be fought over water, not oil. I note there's already low level conflict in Chile over water shortages and that can only spread as global warming bites. Predictions that massive icebergs may one day be towed to drought-stricken countries may not be that far-fetched. Not sure how that'll help landlocked countries, but I guess they'll think of something.

P.S. Don't ask me who 'they' are... I haven't worked that one out yet.


message 10: by Terence (new)

Terence Park | 6 comments Most of our problems are of our own making. At times we amplify the importance of one set of figures or another to create hysteria. When there is real crisis this can stimulate creative solutions. However, world population has never been higher - we may be running low on hard to replace resources but we are in a stable place. Now's a good time to evaluate future choices. Self-interest of the few might well govern the future of our children's children but here and now is a Golden Age.
Oh. Population.


message 11: by James, Group Founder (new)

James Morcan | 11067 comments Iain wrote: "Skim reading is the new normal. The effect on society is profound

When the reading brain skims texts, we don’t have time to grasp complexity, to understand another’s feelings or to perceive beauty..."


thats a major problemo

but the modern world kinda forces us to do it


message 12: by James, Group Founder (new)

James Morcan | 11067 comments Iain wrote: "Scientists have discovered a sea of fresh water under the ocean

Thousands of years ago, glaciers covered much of the planet. Oceans receded as water froze in massive sheets of ice blanketing the N..."


Interesting find!


message 13: by James, Group Founder (new)

James Morcan | 11067 comments Iain wrote: "Ocado to invest £17m in vertical farming

Ocado, one of the world's largest online-only food retailers, today announced the formation of a joint venture called Infinite Acres with partners Priva an..."


vertical farming apparently is the future


message 14: by James, Group Founder (new)

James Morcan | 11067 comments Iain wrote: "From sky farms to lab-grown shrimp, Singapore eyes food future

With tiered fish farms, vegetable plots atop office buildings and lab-grown shrimp, the island aims to beef up its own food productio..."


Makes sense in places like Singapore and Hong Kong where there's such limited space.

Siberian Jesus won't need it out there in Russia tho...He's probably a luddite anyway, or else wouldn't want his followers in the cult group having access to tech...


message 15: by James, Group Founder (new)

James Morcan | 11067 comments cool device that straw


message 16: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 1361 comments Iain wrote: "Could Space-Based Solar Save The World?

Solar power is on the rise, and that's a good thing. But solar power has one major drawback - it can't make energy at night, which is literally half the tim..."


My concern would be, what do you do with the power you generate? The obvious answer is, beam it down with microwave energy, but beam it where? The ground is always moving, and half the time your target is on the other side of the planet. The other question is where do you put this collector? Is it orbiting Earth? Is it at a Lagrange point? It is going to have to be huge to be useful, and if at L1 it will be shading Earth; if at L2 Earth will be shading it, at least some of the time. If it is in orbit, there will be times when it is not doing anything very useful


message 17: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 1361 comments It is getting complicated, Iain. The problem is, everything in orbit has different periodic times, and the orbit of the satellite is not over the same part of the planet because the planet is rotating. The orbits repeat, but make that your frame of reference, and the planet is busy rotating inside it, so your relay chain and your source are always changing their relative positions, and the Earth is changing too. Complicated, it is.


message 18: by J. (new)

J. Gowin | 121 comments Orbital PV arrays are a neat idea, but I think that Ian is correct. Between power loss in transmission and targeting issues, I don't see how it is viable as a power source on Earth.

That said, we could put vast arrays at the Lagrange points and use them to power heavy industry such as asteroid mining, foundries, and ship yards, at a safe distance from Earth.


message 19: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 1361 comments If you were going to use it for asteroid mining, it should be possible to have the solar collectors adjacent to the processing plant. That way you would avoid the loss of power through dispersion over a large distance. Thus the distance between L4 or L5 (the two stable Lagrange points) and Earth is the same distance as Earth-Sun, and that gives quite some disperion possibilities since it is very difficult to make a parallel microwave beam.


message 20: by J. (new)

J. Gowin | 121 comments Having the power supply, processing, and manufacturing facilities together at a Lagrange point was my meaning. I apologize for not being clear enough.

When I thought about ways of efficiently getting power from a satellite to Earth, the possible solutions were far more impressive feats than the PV array would have been. I figure that if you're going to go big, then you should go really big. To that end, a massive industrial facility in a position that is cheap to maintain; far enough away to be fail safed for catastrophic failures; but still close enough to support infrastructure projects in Earth space would be very useful. Looking forward, I imagine that once you got it working well, you would want to use it to build an automated starter kit version of itself. This kit could be sent to Mars, Venus, and/or Jupiter, ahead of colonists, to set up at a Lagrange point, and have significant resources waiting when the colonists arrive.


message 21: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 1361 comments When talking of Lagrange points, it helps to state which ones. In one post above I carelessly assumed the Earth-Sun system, but of course there is also the Earth-Moon system. Gerard O'Nell proposed, in his "High Frontier", colonies at such points. I have included this concept in a couple of my SF novels (and in another I am currently writing). The problem with solar mirrors, of course, is they have to be huge, which is another problem in getting everything up there.

For my Earth-Moon Lagrange colonies, I assumed that most of the material to build it would be thrown up from the Moon from a mass driver, and if you are going to do that, you can also throw up some KREEP, which also has thorium and uranium, in which case nuclear energy is also a possibility.


message 22: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 1361 comments The direct CO2 capture machines still leave the problem, what to do with the CO2? Better off to use biomass and bury the required biomass each year, and if you don't like that, then do geoengineering and raise the albedo.


message 23: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 1361 comments Iain wrote: "Sydney's water supply falling at fastest rate on record due to drought

SYDNEY (Reuters) - Australia’s biggest city Sydney is running down its water supply at the fastest rate on record with dams e..."


This seems to be a repeat of something that happened a couple of years ago or so. One problem with Australia is it goes for very long periods without rain, then gets some terrible deluges. I recall my last day in Armidale where I had lived for a while, the rain was horrible, and over to the west, there was a hundred kilometer-wide wall of water involving the Peel, Namoi and another river that I have forgotten heading south-west.


message 24: by Lance, Group Founder (new)

Lance Morcan | 2715 comments Iain wrote: "Sydney's water supply falling at fastest rate on record due to drought

SYDNEY (Reuters) - Australia’s biggest city Sydney is running down its water supply at the fastest rate on record with dams e..."


Iain - I wonder which is the bigger problem: Sydney's "record" drought or media hype? Every year somewhere in Aussie for as long as I remember media have been announcing "record droughts".

I notice here in NZ media now refer to approaching storms as "weather events" and, heaven forbid, a thunder storm is now a "weather bomb".

It serves as a constant reminder that sensationalism sells. We see it in all areas of journalism today be it politics, sport, entertainment or dare I say weather.

But I digress... How's it looking over your way? It's bloody cold here today.


message 25: by Lance, Group Founder (new)

Lance Morcan | 2715 comments Ian wrote: "Iain wrote: "Sydney's water supply falling at fastest rate on record due to drought

SYDNEY (Reuters) - Australia’s biggest city Sydney is running down its water supply at the fastest rate on recor..."


It sure is a land of contrasts Ian. Just as well they make them tough over there! And what about those crocs and snakes...not to mention the midgies!


message 26: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 1361 comments Lance wrote: "Ian wrote: "Iain wrote: "Sydney's water supply falling at fastest rate on record due to drought

SYDNEY (Reuters) - Australia’s biggest city Sydney is running down its water supply at the fastest r..."


What I found most annoying with the outback was the flies. They didn't actually do much, but they sure were annoying.


message 27: by Lance, Group Founder (new)

Lance Morcan | 2715 comments Ian wrote: "Lance wrote: "Ian wrote: "Iain wrote: "Sydney's water supply falling at fastest rate on record due to drought

SYDNEY (Reuters) - Australia’s biggest city Sydney is running down its water supply at..."


Ever try a cork hat?


message 29: by J. (new)

J. Gowin | 121 comments I view Australia's water problems as a result of three different problems which have global implications.

1.) I believe climate change is a minor factor here. That said it is real and dangerous. Though there will be winners and losers, the specific outcomes are as yet uncertain.

2.) Sydney exists because of her incredible natural harbor and a creek that you could step over. Yep, Sydney's original water supply was a trickle of water, just big enough for a small colony. The water supply was always tenuous.

3.) In my opinion, the single biggest driver is population growth. For Australia, it has held steady at around 1.6% for the last couple of years. Keep in mind that Australia's population density leans far more urban than most countries, with 20% of total population living in Sydney (a city founded on a trickle). Australia's economy needs this growth, but with every year the growth heaps more demand on an already over used watershed.

Sydney's saving grace is the fact that they aren't short of water, they are short on potable water. As demand increases and the technology (hopefully) improves, desalination may become a real solution for Sydney. The same cannot be said for central India.


message 30: by James, Group Founder (new)

James Morcan | 11067 comments I live in Sydney. It's just business as usual here guys. There are always references to drought, water levels, etc. Other than that, not many reports in the local news to water shortages. And there have been much worse droughts than this. In fact, in recent years Sydney and NSW have experienced a lot more rain than usual (although not this year so far).

Sorry to ruin the party.


message 31: by James, Group Founder (new)

James Morcan | 11067 comments Maybe the apocalypse has begun, Iain, but you gotta watch journalists hyping up news stories... Or in this case environmentalists with agendas?

I will keep wearing crocs and using water freely until real signs of the apocalypse emerge. By then it will be too late of course!


message 32: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 1361 comments There is no evidence at all for such a "tipping point". My guess is it is far more likely we are following a standard hysteresis curve with climate change. Not that that should bring comfort because in some ways it make the problem worse.


message 33: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 1361 comments Typical - and the rich won't even be breeding them.


message 34: by James, Group Founder (new)

James Morcan | 11067 comments Hope cheetahs, tigers and lions don't end up a ghost of the past like the Thylacine, aka the Tassie Tiger!

Thylacine - Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thylacine
Tasmanian tiger


message 35: by James, Group Founder (new)

James Morcan | 11067 comments Iain wrote: "I give them 10 years at this rate. ..."

10 years until the Tassie Tiger's extinction is reversed via Jurassic Park-style tech?

I'll drink to that!
In fact, this legendary deceased Tasmanian would drink to that too... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DBrlq...


message 36: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 1361 comments Iain wrote: "British seagrass could help tackle climate change

https://news.sky.com/story/british-se..."


Some marine algae are the fastest-growing plants on the planet. It is fascinating to watch the cells of M. pyrifera through a microscope - you can watch the cells dividing and the plant growing


message 37: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 1361 comments Macroalgae do have uses - potential for biofuels, there are already industries worth a few billion dollars, but food us is more limited. They are good for certain animal feed and agricultural use, thy provide trace elements, but their polysaccharides are largely indigestible to humans. They can be used for food as emulsifiers, gelling agents, etc, but the actual polysaccharide generally goes straight through. OK, good for dietary fibre as well. Many are also angiogenesis inhibitors, which is why the Japanese have very low rates of gut cancer. Microalgae are more nutritious; if you could breed them with lower nucleic acids they would provide rich sources of fat and protein

As for Mars, in one of my novels on colonizing Mars, I outlined some of the problems of getting enough water, but if it is kept liquid, then algae provide oxygen and the feed for fish farming, and fish (and things like shrimps) are probably the most productive source of "meat".


message 38: by James, Group Founder (new)

James Morcan | 11067 comments Did you ever consider writing a non-fiction science book, Ian? I think you're one of the few who can describe complicated scientific matters or technologies in simple ways.


message 39: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 1361 comments James wrote: "Did you ever consider writing a non-fiction science book, Ian? I think you're one of the few who can describe complicated scientific matters or technologies in simple ways."

I have actually written five, but four of them are very technical and aimed at a scientific audience. The fifth, on biofuels, did not sell at all well


message 40: by James, Group Founder (new)

James Morcan | 11067 comments Sixth time lucky?!


message 41: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 1361 comments Hmmm. We shall see.


message 42: by Lance, Group Founder (new)

Lance Morcan | 2715 comments Iain wrote: "Earth 100 Million Years From Now

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uGcDe..."


It appears there's going to be a lot more water and a lot less land... Where are we going to put everyone? On Mars perhaps?


message 43: by Lance, Group Founder (new)

Lance Morcan | 2715 comments Iain wrote: "Lance wrote: "Iain wrote: "Earth 100 Million Years From Now

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uGcDe..."

It appears there's going to be a lot more water and a lot less land... Where..."


Um... Do I want to live underwater?


message 44: by Lance, Group Founder (new)

Lance Morcan | 2715 comments Iain wrote: "Lance wrote: "Iain wrote: "Lance wrote: "Iain wrote: "Earth 100 Million Years From Now

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uGcDe..."

It appears there's going to be a lot more water a..."


It's a long shot I admit, but it appears with all the advances in AI, robots, science and medicine there's an outside chance I could be. Even so, I don't wish to live underwater... Hypothetically, is there another option you can offer?


message 45: by Lance, Group Founder (new)

Lance Morcan | 2715 comments P.S. Why are you still up? Shouldn't you be in bed?


message 46: by Lance, Group Founder (new)

Lance Morcan | 2715 comments Iain wrote: "Lance wrote: "Iain wrote: "Lance wrote: "Iain wrote: "Lance wrote: "Iain wrote: "Earth 100 Million Years From Now

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uGcDe..."

It appears there's goi..."


Been there mate. It's over-rated.


message 47: by Lance, Group Founder (new)

Lance Morcan | 2715 comments Iain wrote: "Lance wrote: "P.S. Why are you still up? Shouldn't you be in bed?"

I am in creative mode, working on some stuff. Like and prefer working through the wee hours."


Keep up the good work Iain. I'm no techie, but some of your posts are very thought provoking.


message 48: by Alexis (new)

Alexis Harding | 72 comments This makes it all sound so easy


message 49: by Jack (new)

Jack Edmunson | 3 comments The Rise of Speculative Fiction?
What do you think?

https://www.troubador.co.uk/blog/#!ri...

#cern #speculativefiction #TheHandMaidensTale


message 50: by Denny (new)

Denny Hunt | 5 comments getwisdom.com Its about solutions. The problems are greatly misunderstood.


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