Watership Down (Watership Down, #1) Watership Down question


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WHAT IS THE Message!
Gabriel Garcia Gabriel Dec 09, 2018 04:31PM
Upon finishing the book, I took some time to reflect on the message the book was trying to tell. The message I decided upon was that nature will lose to humans because of the many obstacles the rabbits come across involve human activity such as traps for rabbits and shooting at them.
I still don't believe completely that this is the main message the author was trying to get across so I researched what the author intended to be the message in which he responded that it has no real message. This frustrates me a bit because the whole point of a story is that it contains something that can change your view on a particular subject.

All this leads me to my question regarding the book. What is the message the book tries to get across and if a story needs a message to be considered a story?



Dustin (last edited Dec 26, 2018 05:47PM ) Dec 13, 2018 03:58PM   2 votes
I think the threat of humans was a minor aspect of the story. They destroyed their first home and shot Hazel, but Hazel embraced that risk when he entered the farm. It's part of the reason why he went. Humans also saved Hazel in the end. There were far more "bad' rabbits than bad humans.

"All this leads me to my question regarding the book. What is the message the book tries to get across and if a story needs a message to be considered a story?"

Personally, I feel that a book shouldn't have an intended message. That's just preaching, trying to convince you to think like the author. A story shouldn't give you answers, they should give you questions to ask yourself and Watership Down offers many.

Which warren would you want to live in? Why wouldn't you want to live in the others?

Would the heroes have fared as well with Bigwig in charge, why?

Why were rabbits like Blackberry ignored in the beginning, but critical under Hazel's leadership?

If Woundwort had accepted Hazel's terms, would he have actually been the villain, or just another Strawberry?

Was Pipkin worth bringing in the end?

Why did Cowslip's rabbits remain and pretend the wires didn't exist?


one of my favorite books. excellent questions to condider.


It's good to have diversity in fiction, I always thought that this was an allegorical tale and disagree strongly with one of the above comments. The author deliberately seems to provoke answeŕs to unanswered questions, which makes the reading experience more relevant.


I listened to the audio version of this with a foreward by the author stating that there is no message, no moral to the story. It's just a story created to entertain his kids on a long car journey.

I can't help feeling there SHOULD be a moral but hey, I didn't write it! And I thought it was a pretty harrowing story for kids too! Had me in tears in places!


Gabriel wrote: "Upon finishing the book, I took some time to reflect on the message the book was trying to tell. The message I decided upon was that nature will lose to humans because of the many obstacles the rab..."

I disagree that the whole point of a story is to contain something to change the readers view on a particular subject. Sometimes a story is just a story, sometimes they have no morals, sometimes its intended to simply evoke certain emotions, or get the reader thinking without any desire to change something they believe.

When I read it as a child, what stood out to me was realism. The rabbits yearned for more than the life and future they were limited to and decided to go out into the world to pursue it.

What they found was a brutal world, that some of their worst threats looked just like them, that some of the worst types of rabbits (people) were those who felt they alone knew what was best for others and that righteousness was enforced with violence. That sometimes the gentlest are the strongest. And sometimes the strongest are scared. Its the same type of world children will go into. Some will become monsters, some will fall prey to other rabbits and some will push through the hardships, help each other and make what they can of their lives.

So did I see a moral? No. I just saw reality. And I'm ok with that.


adjusting to change and sticking together through thick and thin


Having the tenacity to fight for the greater good


Love this book. I believe there is a message in e everything. Perhaps, the author has declared there is no message intention when writing. Many artists are disclaiming their own expression in their works these days. A great tragedy, to my mind. If a persons work had no intended meaning. What becomes of passion. Why then, paint a picture, compose music, pen a novel, choreograph a dance, write a poem? If you have no intent, no passion no soul, to pour yourself into your work. Expressing yourself. I think it would be remiss to believe this story was written, without some intent. To be left with so much to ponder.


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