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Publishing and Promoting > Looking for an agent or publicist

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message 1: by Michael (new)

Michael Bronte | 2 comments I have eight novels currently listed on Goodreads and other places. All self published with good reviews. Does anyone have any suggestions on a legitimate agent or publicist?


message 2: by Anthony (new)

Anthony Whitt | 2 comments I'm thinking about taking the same step. It's like walking in a mine field looking for a ghost.


message 3: by Charles (new)

Charles Garard (goodreadscomcharles_garard) | 142 comments Good question for us all. I also have 8 e-books online for Kindle et.al.

Agents are no longer like Maxwell Perkins.

Beware of agents who just HAPPEN to have a reader (editor) standing by, often the husband or wife of the agent.


message 4: by Mallory (new)

Mallory O'Connor | 3 comments After self-pubising my first three novels, I'd be interested in finding an agent for my next series. I try to keep up with the "manuscript wish list" and other ways to find agents who are supposedly looking for authors, but it's really hard to break in. Same with publicists (unless you've won the lottery).


message 5: by Karl (new)

Karl Braungart | 39 comments Hi Mallory,
Finding an agent...do you mean someone who line edits or a copy editor? There is the literary agent who represents the go-between us and the publisher.
It has been difficult to find an editor to read my novels and make corrections, or tell me to make corrections; they do but not enough. It seems that they get bored, or not really the right person to edit my genre.
It would be great for Writers' Digest to have a list of editors who specialize in a particular genre. My experiences have been negative. Not being able to have face-to-face interviews with editors or even telephone conversations that let me ask questions about their achievements. Provide one or two names of books...
I have invested in ProWritingAid and Grammarly to help me edit. I still want to find a qualified person.
My genre is suspense-espionage.
Good luck. Karl Braungart


message 6: by Mallory (new)

Mallory O'Connor | 3 comments A good editor is a real help! And it DOES make a difference. But good editors (like everything else) are not cheap. Still the difference between an editor that charged $950. and one who charged $650. was significant. The more expensive editor was MUCH better and worth the extra $$.


message 7: by James (new)

James True | 3 comments I hired an editor for my book and paid $500.00. In the end, it felt more like i hired a proofreader. I was somewhat disappointed in the feedback. But, being my first book I considered the whole process a learning experience.

My next book I plan on looking harder for an editor. Finding the right genre seems crucial or as Karl said, they get bored.


message 8: by Jacob (new)

Jacob Graysol | 5 comments This has really become two threads, agent and editor.
Editor: For self-published authors, the Editorial Freelancers Association is a great resource. I'll type the link here, not sure if Goodreads allows that or not but it says some html is ok: the{dash}efa{dot}org Almost all of the editors list genres on the EFA website (and you can search by genre), and almost all have their own websites so you can check their backgrounds and usually references. If the editor can't explain the difference between line-editing, copyediting, and proofreading, or cite repeat customers, you do run the risk of not getting what you expect -- James, sorry you had the bad experience.
Agent: I was unable to get an agent using the traditional "mail an unsolicited pitch letter" route, but a few rejections were specific enough that I could tell the agents had read at least some of the sample pages. There's a Guide to Literary Agents published each year, listing genres for each agent (or at least each agency), but I've found it necessary to supplement that by going to the current websites for current wish list and submission guidelines. I've had lots of people like my first novel, but I don't have the resume of other writers and I think that hurt my chances with agents. Several writers' associations have conferences that include "pitch sessions" where you basically speed-date with agents for that genre -- always a meaningful cost, but at least you can tell if your plot seems publishable to them and then gauge feedback if they ask for sample pages (or, in some cases, the entire manuscript).


message 9: by J.J. (new)

J.J. Hanna | 23 comments Hi all!

On the topic of agents, there are a few non-book related things that may assist with your search for an agent. Things such as platform and past book sales have a huge impact on whether an agent will take you on as a client. They want to be sure you have the ability to sell books, otherwise, they'll go to the client with an equally as impressive book and the platform to help market it.

As far as editors go, finding a good one is essential, as is being clear on what you're expecting from the editor. If you're looking for reasonable prices with skilled editors, I can guarantee that anyone from Taylor University's Professional Writing major has the abilities. Some of them have even created their own editing company, called Sherpa Editing Services found at sherpaediting(dot)com. (If you're interested, I also freelance, my prices can be found on my website under services, find the link on my page.)

If you're looking for ways to pitch, joining Twitter pitch parties can be useful. In Twitter pitch parties, you tweet your pitch with the proper hashtags and editors and agents scroll through and heart the pitches they want sent to them. Then you send your proposal to the proper editor/agent, and hope for the best.

Writers' conferences are also invaluable but somewhat expensive.

Hope this helps!


message 10: by B. (new)

B. Goodwin | 14 comments I edit giving feedback on what I love and what trips me up. I ask questions as well, and they usually give readers insight. People tell me they get far more than they expected. You can find details about what I do along with client reviews of my work at https://writeradvice.com/manuscript-c.... Take a look and see if I offer what you are looking for. I'd love to help.


message 11: by Colin (new)

Colin Guest | 21 comments Mallory wrote: "A good editor is a real help! And it DOES make a difference. But good editors (like everything else) are not cheap. Still the difference between an editor that charged $950. and one who charged $65..."
After checkin g out a number of editors I found the cost more than I could afford. I then heard about Fiveer.com. After trying a few of their edittors I found what to me is a good editor at very resonable cost. She has now done two of my books and just completed editing my published novel that had previously been edited by someone else. I will for sure be using her again. I suggest to check out Fiver.com for yourself.


message 12: by Colin (new)

Colin Guest | 21 comments James wrote: "I hired an editor for my book and paid $500.00. In the end, it felt more like i hired a proofreader. I was somewhat disappointed in the feedback. But, being my first book I considered the whole pro..."

I could not afford the cost you paid, so more than pleased with the far less cost of under $200 that I paid to have my novel edited. See above post.


message 13: by Karl (new)

Karl Braungart | 39 comments Mallory wrote: "A good editor is a real help! And it DOES make a difference. But good editors (like everything else) are not cheap. Still the difference between an editor that charged $950. and one who charged $65..."

Yes, a good editor is not cheap. However, I've never found one that charged less than $.02/word. If you know of any, please post them.


message 14: by K.A. (new)

K.A. Bryant | 11 comments This conversation is very informative. I squeeze in time to read the chats that are going on. Glad I picked this one. All the best to everyone.


message 15: by Elyce (new)

Elyce Wakerman | 35 comments Just a word to the wise: be very very careful before hiring a publicist. Promises can be dazzling and seem well-worth the cost of signing. Talk to other authors that the publicist has represented before taking the leap. Good luck!


message 16: by Karl (new)

Karl Braungart | 39 comments Hi Elyce, thanks for the advice. Paralleling your info, it would be beneficial for all of us to offer names of pros who can be a true publicist or a worthwhile editor. Someone(s) who has positive credentials.


message 17: by Elyce (new)

Elyce Wakerman | 35 comments Good idea, Karl. As you can tell from my previous post, I can't recommend a publicist, but those who can could certainly use this forum to spread the word on someone solid and effective.


message 18: by Karl (new)

Karl Braungart | 39 comments Let's keep our fingers crossed. Finding an editor(s) in specific genres would be great. I'm a suspense-espionage guy


message 19: by B. (new)

B. Goodwin | 14 comments Am I a worthwhile editor? Judge for yourself. http://www.writeradvice.com/manuscrip...
Or write me with your questions.


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