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Genius Intelligence (The Underground Knowledge Series, #1)
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SECRET METHODS TO INCREASE IQ > Polyglots and savants

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message 1: by James, Group Founder (last edited Jun 13, 2017 02:08PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

James Morcan | 7757 comments Excerpt from GENIUS INTELLIGENCE: Secret Techniques and Technologies to Increase IQ:


In our fictional series The Orphan Trilogy, the Pedemont orphans all speak a large number of languages and are therefore polyglots. Although we never actually specify how many, it’s implied in our trilogy that each orphan can speak dozens of languages. They also have the ability to learn new ones quickly, and more than once we show our orphans, or orphan-operatives, mastering languages in the days leading up to a new mission.

The Orphan Trilogy (The Orphan Trilogy #1-3) by James Morcan

While this may seem far-fetched, there have been persistent reports of CIA agents mastering languages within one week. If true, this is most likely a direct result of classified learning techniques or brain technologies not available to the general public.

In 2004, British autistic savant Daniel Tammet shocked Icelandic peoples when he appeared on live television to demonstrate his overnight mastery of their notoriously complex language. Tammet spoke fluent Icelandic, having only studied the language for seven days.

GENIUS INTELLIGENCE Secret Techniques and Technologies to Increase IQ (The Underground Knowledge Series, #1) by James Morcan


message 2: by James, Group Founder (last edited Jun 13, 2017 02:07PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

James Morcan | 7757 comments Another excerpt from GENIUS INTELLIGENCE: Secret Techniques and Technologies to Increase IQ:


Besides savants like Daniel Tammet and others born with rare genetic gifts that allow for such rapid memorization skills, is polyglotism, or the ability to master multiple languages, achievable for the average person?

Yes.

Notable polyglots throughout history include the following (with numbers in brackets corresponding to the amount of languages they spoke fluently): Cleopatra (9), Mithridates VI of Pontus (22), John Milton (11), Noah Webster (23), Arthur Rimbaud (10+), Giuseppe Caspar Mezzofanti (39), Friedrich Engels (20+), Nikola Tesla (8), José Rizal (22), Harold Williams (58), Mahapandit Rahul Sankrityayan (36) and Kenneth L. Hale (50).

Memory is obviously a major part of mastering languages quickly and perhaps Joshua Foer, a former journalist who became a mnemoticist, has some answers for those desiring to be polyglots.

Foer authored the bestselling book Moonwalking with Einstein: The Art and Science of Remembering Everything, which chronicles his journey to becoming a memory expert. The book also describes how after only one year of training he was able to become USA Memory Champion.

Moonwalking with Einstein The Art and Science of Remembering Everything by Joshua Foer

“Memory is like a spiderweb that catches new information,” Foer writes in Moonwalking with Einstein. “The more it catches, the bigger it grows. And the bigger it grows, the more it catches.”

A contemporary polyglot is Irishman Benny Lewis who speaks 12 languages fluently. Lewis, who taught himself in Dutch in only six weeks and proved it by recording a video of himself being interviewed in Dutch, runs a website devoted to teaching others how to speed learn languages.

The self-confessed mediocre student has also published a book Fluent in 3 Months: How Anyone at Any Age Can Learn to Speak Any Language from Anywhere in the World which has received excellent reviews.

“The book is everything I’ve learned in 11 years of full-time language learning,” Lewis told UK news site Metro in an article dated March 13, 2014. “It’s all the changes in mentality and, of course, the techniques, because there are plenty of tricks to mastering a language from scratch.

Fluent in 3 Months How Anyone at Any Age Can Learn to Speak Any Language from Anywhere in the World by Benny Lewis

“Language books are generally written by people with PhDs in linguistics or born into multilingual environments and I didn’t see anything that was relatable. I did poorly in school – barely passed German – and felt people would relate to that.”

Some of Lewis’ simple language learning techniques include: speaking the language from day one rather than studying text books; listening for specific words or segments you recognize rather than entire sentences; making vivid mental associations in order to remembering certain words.

From the numerous examples listed in this thread and else where in this genius IQ section, it should be clear that learning multiple languages in rapid time is possible. And, unlike naturally-gifted savants such as Daniel Tammet, it should also be noted that Benny Lewis and many other historical and modern polyglots are essentially savants-by-training. Therefore, it does indeed appear possible for the layman to acquire the necessary skills to become a polyglot.


GENIUS INTELLIGENCE Secret Techniques and Technologies to Increase IQ (The Underground Knowledge Series, #1) by James Morcan


message 3: by Catherine (last edited Nov 12, 2014 12:35AM) (new) - added it

Catherine wow! I love languages..but this is crazy!!! 50 languages??? I can say I agree...it is easier for some to learn languanges than others...not sure what the relationship is...but one has to have an "ear" for it....I know it is related to music..in tht your brain has to be able to "hear" the sounds and be able to process them...in order to be able to pronounce them
in the past people in power (especially) had to be able to master multiple languages to be able to rule successfully. but I never imagined that many!

you will also find that certain language are related to each other....which helps enable learning...one exampleis Latin...whilst it is considered a "dead" language...it seems to be very much alive...we see it's relatonship to all of what are known as romance languages....French, romanian, Portuguese, Italian and Spanish....there are similarities in vocabulary, although occassionally spelling and pronunciation may vary slightly.

although other languages differ completely fom Latin...knowing and being able to "hear" the language makes it that much easier to llearn completely foreign languages...for instance...I know how to count to 10 (I know..won't get me far) in 10 languages....and I can say "hello" and "goodbye" in another 2 or 3. I know some other vocabulary in all these languages as well....and whilst I don't speak fluently....this would be a very big help in my learning process...no CIA training technique required!


message 4: by James, Group Founder (new) - rated it 5 stars

James Morcan | 7757 comments Catherine wrote: "wow! I love languages..but this is crazy!!! 50 languages??? I can say I agree...it is easier for some to learn languanges than others...not sure what the relationship is...but one has to have an..."

Yeah, I agree hearing a language is likely to be a big part of it...Some people just seem to have an ear for languages and pick them up so fast and effortlessly...


message 5: by Catherine (new) - added it

Catherine that was a bit long-winded....but I also would like to add....it also makes a big differnce at what age you begin learning.....for some reason a younger brain learns more easily....at least with the first foreign language.....once you have one language down...it is that much easier to learn another :)


message 6: by James, Group Founder (new) - rated it 5 stars

James Morcan | 7757 comments Catherine wrote: "that was a bit long-winded....but I also would like to add....it also makes a big differnce at what age you begin learning.....for some reason a younger brain learns more easily....at least with th..."

Agreed and that's maybe why people who grow up in multi-lingual countries (like Switzerland or India) have a big advantage in learning new languages.


message 7: by Catherine (new) - added it

Catherine James wrote: "Catherine wrote: "wow! I love languages..but this is crazy!!! 50 languages??? I can say I agree...it is easier for some to learn languanges than others...not sure what the relationship is...but ..."

I don't know if that is a precursor to increased IQ...but I am not a super genius and I know several languages...lol...can you "learn" to be a genius? how do you increase your IQ that significantly to make you genius level?


message 8: by Catherine (new) - added it

Catherine James wrote: "Catherine wrote: "that was a bit long-winded....but I also would like to add....it also makes a big differnce at what age you begin learning.....for some reason a younger brain learns more easily....."



yes....but English is almost always taught...and it is not an easy language to master....


message 9: by James, Group Founder (last edited Nov 12, 2014 12:45AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

James Morcan | 7757 comments Catherine wrote: "can you "learn" to be a genius? how do you increase your IQ that significantly to make you genius level? ..."

I am writing a new book about this right now, Catherine...It'll be published before Christmas...But yes, you can learn to be a genius...There are two types of genius: one designed by nature and one nurture...A lot of geniuses are described as "being born with those skills" or "naturally gifted", but according to my research many of these individuals were not born that way and did little-known techniques (or used certain technologies) to become geniuses and/or polymaths.


message 10: by Catherine (new) - added it

Catherine wow....so there is hope for me yet! lol


message 11: by James, Group Founder (new) - rated it 5 stars

James Morcan | 7757 comments Catherine wrote: "wow....so there is hope for me yet! lol"

Yes, there is hope for all of us!


message 12: by Catherine (new) - added it

Catherine just wanted to add....that maths is also related to music....in the grand "learning" scheme... so if you like music....you will most likely be good in languages and/or maths


message 13: by James, Group Founder (new) - rated it 5 stars

James Morcan | 7757 comments Catherine wrote: "just wanted to add....that maths is also related to music....in the grand "learning" scheme... so if you like music....you will most likely be good in languages and/or maths"

Yes and also many musicians such as Burt Bacharach and a lot of classical composers apply mathematical principles to their music.


message 14: by Catherine (last edited Nov 12, 2014 03:16AM) (new) - added it

Catherine one question....as you are probably aware....geniuses very often lack "common sense' so.....what I want to know is by becoming a genius...old you then lose your common sense?


message 15: by James, Group Founder (new) - rated it 5 stars

James Morcan | 7757 comments Catherine wrote: "one question....as you are probably aware....geniuses very often lack "common sense' so.....what I want to know is by becoming a genius...old you then lose your common sense?"

You mean like the genius is flawed theory?
I think it's a bit of a myth really. In saying that, many geniuses are exploring unchartered territory not only in terms of IQ but also in terms of the fields they work in, so they possibly have a propensity to get strung out due to that. But I think there are plenty of stable geniuses just as there are really crazy stupid people...


message 16: by Catherine (last edited Nov 12, 2014 04:05AM) (new) - added it

Catherine there are...I'm sure...but wouldn't you agree that most (not all) lose that sense of what we would call "common intelligence"? I am not saying that they are unstable....just that there is a lacking capacity to encompass the common.....simply because they are genius...I'm simply saying that they don't necessarily comprehend (if you will) the common....for exmple..laundry, dishes, housework...
more...what I guess I'm saying is that they are single-minded...like Beethoven, Bach,.....were musical geniuses....


message 17: by Lance, Group Founder (new) - rated it 5 stars

Lance Morcan | 1985 comments Catherine wrote: "there are...I'm sure...but wouldn't you agree that most (not all) lose that sense of what we would call "common intelligence"? I am not saying that they are unstable....just that there is a lackin..."

Now you've got me thinking Catherine. I'm one of those who "lack capacity to encompass the common...for exmple...laundry, dishes, housework." Do you think it's time I got my IQ checked?


message 18: by Catherine (last edited Nov 12, 2014 12:02PM) (new) - added it

Catherine Lance wrote: "Catherine wrote: "there are...I'm sure...but wouldn't you agree that most (not all) lose that sense of what we would call "common intelligence"? I am not saying that they are unstable....just that..."

lol...well?!?!? I don't know! I mean do have a clean house? and if so...who does clean(if not you)?!?!? I mean...do you at least pick up your dirty socks? haha

and in that case....are you saying you're a genius? :)


message 19: by Catherine (new) - added it

Catherine Lance wrote: "Catherine wrote: "there are...I'm sure...but wouldn't you agree that most (not all) lose that sense of what we would call "common intelligence"? I am not saying that they are unstable....just that..."

or...here you go...do you "forget"..as in find these things unimportant as to not think about them, or just not do these things! there is a fine line here!


message 20: by Lance, Group Founder (new) - rated it 5 stars

Lance Morcan | 1985 comments Catherine wrote: "Lance wrote: "Catherine wrote: "there are...I'm sure...but wouldn't you agree that most (not all) lose that sense of what we would call "common intelligence"? I am not saying that they are unstabl..."

I'm gonna need to think on all that. Gimme a day or two to come up with something intelligent.


message 21: by Catherine (new) - added it

Catherine Lance wrote: "Catherine wrote: "Lance wrote: "Catherine wrote: "there are...I'm sure...but wouldn't you agree that most (not all) lose that sense of what we would call "common intelligence"? I am not saying tha..."

ok....see you tomorrow :) something intellingent, hmm???


message 22: by Catherine (new) - added it

Catherine hey Lance???!!!!!?!?! did you fall into a black hole!?!? lol


message 23: by Lance, Group Founder (new) - rated it 5 stars

Lance Morcan | 1985 comments Catherine wrote: "hey Lance???!!!!!?!?! did you fall into a black hole!?!? lol"

Na...I give up. I can't come up with anything intelligent this time round.


message 24: by Catherine (new) - added it

Catherine lol....you're giving up?


message 25: by Lance, Group Founder (new) - rated it 5 stars

Lance Morcan | 1985 comments Catherine wrote: "lol....you're giving up?"

Actually, come to think about it, my wife looks after me pretty good and I'd be a mess without her. So maybe that proves genius is flawed! (Or should that be floored?).


message 26: by Catherine (new) - added it

Catherine Lance wrote: "Catherine wrote: "lol....you're giving up?"

Actually, come to think about it, my wife looks after me pretty good and I'd be a mess without her. So maybe that proves genius is flawed! (Or should th..."


haha! are you saying you you wouldn't be able to function without her? that doesn't make you genius! it makes you needy...but that's ok :)


message 27: by Lance, Group Founder (new) - rated it 5 stars

Lance Morcan | 1985 comments Catherine wrote: "Lance wrote: "Catherine wrote: "lol....you're giving up?"

Actually, come to think about it, my wife looks after me pretty good and I'd be a mess without her. So maybe that proves genius is flawed!..."


I'm comfortable with needy.


message 28: by Catherine (new) - added it

Catherine haha!!! do you pick p your socks, at least? lol


message 29: by Lance, Group Founder (new) - rated it 5 stars

Lance Morcan | 1985 comments Catherine wrote: "haha!!! do you pick p your socks, at least? lol"

Mostly yup.


message 30: by Catherine (new) - added it

Catherine haha! :)


message 31: by Catherine (last edited Nov 17, 2014 02:15PM) (new) - added it

Catherine know any single (almost geniuses) down under? lol


message 32: by James, Group Founder (new) - rated it 5 stars

James Morcan | 7757 comments Returning to the original topic...
I've been thinking that maybe those who are multilingual from a young age may have more parts of their brain activated... As different languages actually use different parts of the brain... So teaching kids more than one language when they start speaking may be a good educational move


message 33: by Catherine (new) - added it

Catherine it's definitely good to know multiple languages. i agree with you there. But, does it make you more likely to be a genius? t may increase your IQ, though, so I guess in theory, it could, but I don;t think it is a definite.

here's' a question....does being a genius, or having a hih IQ, make it easier to learn? or does the learning make you more prone to bedome a genius?


message 34: by Catherine (new) - added it

Catherine James wrote: "Returning to the original topic...
I've been thinking that maybe those who are multilingual from a young age may have more parts of their brain activated... As different languages actually use diff..."


spoilsport! lol


message 35: by James, Group Founder (last edited Nov 17, 2014 07:55PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

James Morcan | 7757 comments Catherine wrote: "it's definitely good to know multiple languages. i agree with you there. But, does it make you more likely to be a genius?..."

Not necessarily, no. It's more about searching for pieces of the puzzle of developing a high IQ and noticing trends in geniuses worldwide.
Geniuses are multifaceted and complex people and no two are the same.
But I would think there are more geniuses who are multilingual than not. And therefore, possibly different languages use slightly different parts of the brain and being multilingual from a young age certainly couldn't hurt a child's intellect.

Also, if you go back to the original post, this whole topic I raised wasn't really about using languages to become a genius...But rather giving examples of various individuals (polyglots) throughout history and the present - some geniuses, some not - that have learnt numerous other languages and learnt each one extremely quickly...So it was more about displays of genius-like abilities in the field of linguistics....


message 36: by Catherine (new) - added it

Catherine no...it wasn't specifically about using language to develop a higher IQ. It just kind of segued there. However, it is a good point....and I guess it is possible that there are more multi-lingual geniuses out there than not...learning, in general, stimulates brain activity...so don't you think that any type of learnt information...whether it be games, languages, science/maths, etc help to display genius-like abilities?


message 37: by James, Group Founder (new) - rated it 5 stars

James Morcan | 7757 comments Bulgarian educator and psychiatrist Dr.Georgi Lozanov (1926-2012) created an education system known as Suggestopedia which is primarily used for speed learning languages.

Although Baroque music is involved in the curriculum, Suggestopedia (also sometimes called Suggestopædia) involves a lot more than just listening to specific compositions. Essentially, the controversial and unproven learning method incorporates a combination of passive and active learning. It also employs various arts – including singing, music, drama and paintings – to put the mind in the most suggestive state for learning.

Admittedly, Dr. Lazanov’s education system is not a conclusive method for speed learning foreign languages and has been written off as mere pseudoscience by some researchers. However, a report on Suggestopedia by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) makes for interesting reading.

Compiled by UNESCO education experts at a meeting in Sofia, Bulgaria in December, 1978, the report concluded: “There is consensus that Suggestopedia is a generally superior teaching method for many subjects and for many types of students, compared with traditional methods. We have arrived at this consensus following a study of the research literature, listening to the testimony of international experts, observing films portraying Suggestopedia instruction and visiting classes in which Suggestopedia is practiced.”

Dr. Lazanov claimed throughout his career that foreign languages could be mastered in a tenth of the usual time by following his methods.


message 38: by Catherine (new) - added it

Catherine Not sure about that...but what I do know is that the age at which one embarks on learning things such as language is a big factor. The younger you are, the easier it is to learn...it seems that the mind is more of a veritable sponge...as one gets older, the learning doesn't necessarily come so easily.


message 40: by Rosalie (new)

Rosalie DeGregory (rosaliedegregory) | 27 comments James wrote: "The Pedemont orphans all speak a large number of languages and are therefore polyglots. Although we never actually specify how many, it’s implied in our trilogy that each orphan can speak dozens of..."

You've probably noticed the many kid geniuses the past 15 or so years. Genius artists, mathematicians, business people, musicians, singers, etc. The sudden number of autistic children (I guess some may be grown by now) is due to a kind of experiment on the spirit side, of incarnation of very advanced human beings. They aren't used to the many emotions and darkness here and they have some trouble speaking linearly. They are used to telepathy. Many of them became autistic in response to so much input they couldn't handle, such as being given maybe 32 vaccines at a time. These advanced people might be expected to learn that quickly on their own.


message 41: by James, Group Founder (new) - rated it 5 stars

James Morcan | 7757 comments Hi Rosalie,
There are a lot of super bright kids around these days.
When you mention experiment, are you referring to the Indigo Children theory?


message 42: by Rosalie (new)

Rosalie DeGregory (rosaliedegregory) | 27 comments No, the Indigos are a big wave, while the others that so often are autistic are beyond them. Just to see how well they'd do and how well we would respond. Really, I'm not sure, generally how to distinguish. I don't know what the auras of those non-Indigos look like.


message 43: by Rosalie (last edited Dec 15, 2014 07:05PM) (new)

Rosalie DeGregory (rosaliedegregory) | 27 comments James wrote: "Catherine wrote: "that was a bit long-winded....but I also would like to add....it also makes a big differnce at what age you begin learning.....for some reason a younger brain learns more easily....."

I do learn languages quickly, but my memory is not so hot, so when not used, I forget. I do pay a lot of attention to and enjoy the sound of a language - well, not to much German. LOL. The sound even helps with grammar.


message 44: by Rosalie (new)

Rosalie DeGregory (rosaliedegregory) | 27 comments I was having doubts about a non-genius developing into one, until I realized that most people mean by that, increasing the IQ. Yes, I think you can score more on an IQ test by learning things, but to become a true genius (beyond an iQ test) from average, I doubt. Just sayin'


message 45: by Rosalie (new)

Rosalie DeGregory (rosaliedegregory) | 27 comments One other point is that mathematics is the highest form of ART. And most mathematicians know that the hard math answers come from intuition, not the rational mind. You hone in and draw down the intuitive information by formulating the question and surrounding it with all the rational facts. Then one night, as you get in bed, perhaps, having dropped the problem from your mind, "I've got it!" you say. Then you figure out how to form from it a rational proof. Of course, nearly everyone nowadays has access to intuition on any subject they care to know about.


message 46: by Rosalie (new)

Rosalie DeGregory (rosaliedegregory) | 27 comments Artists have always more easily accessed the intuitive through the right side of the brain. Now, the left and right sides of our brains are bridging together. Not to mention that our DNA is evolving to access more strands of it.


message 47: by Rosalie (last edited Dec 15, 2014 07:32PM) (new)

Rosalie DeGregory (rosaliedegregory) | 27 comments Ex., Michael Jordan's brain is fused. He didn't linearly assess what went on on the court and step by step plan his moves. He saw the whole configuration of the court, and automatically responded to the actions.

Anyway, a genius at language would all at once get the music of the language and have the rational ability to form sentences automatically orchestrated like a Michael Jordan of language.


message 48: by James, Group Founder (new) - rated it 5 stars

James Morcan | 7757 comments Rosalie wrote: "I was having doubts about a non-genius developing into one, until I realized that most people mean by that, increasing the IQ. Yes, I think you can score more on an IQ test by learning things, but..."

I know what you mean Rosalie and used to think exactly that and simply assumed that most geniuses were just born that way and that was the end of story.

However, having now spent the last decade or so researching geniuses throughout history (both recent history and centuries ago), in the vast majority of cases the genius is born myth is just that: a myth.

Einstein was terrible at school initially, Mozart was not necessarily naturally gifted but instead forced (by his renowned composer father) to practice studying music all day every day from a baby onwards - and the list goes on and on of similar examples.

What you eventually discover is nature (the genes we are born with) is very overrated and nurture (methods to enhance intelligence) is extremely underrated.

Autistic savants and incredible child prodigies aside, at least 90% of geniuses did unique things to aid them in their achievements.

Examples I can think of off the top of my head include: Einstein came up with his greatest discovery (the theory of relativity) while in an advanced form of hypnosis, Mozart employed altered states techniques to induce the perfect creative states, Steve Jobs used rare Yogic methods to activate his brain glands (BEFORE he got the idea to create Apple). Again, I could go on and on about examples of those using nurture and not relying on nature.

Furthermore, the parents of many child prodigies are also often doing unique things (education wise) but it's usually underreported. Even reading to your child every day while it's in the womb has been shown to greatly increase the likelihood of raising a high IQ individual as does breastfeeding compared to feeding the baby non-breast milk.


message 49: by Rosalie (new)

Rosalie DeGregory (rosaliedegregory) | 27 comments Wasn't Mozart playing at age 4 and composing at 4-5?

How would you explain a whole family and lineage of gifted people, branches of which really have little stimulation, but farm life and reading. You know, kids who speaks like an adult by age 2. No books or magazines in the house, but farm related, for the most part. Little effort on the parents part to push mental stimulation. A school that never encouraged them, and only taught to the average student, yet always achieving, always at the top?

I realize that stimulation helps a little, but doesn't create geniuses from average ability. It can, however, awaken innate ability.


message 50: by James, Group Founder (last edited Dec 15, 2014 09:19PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

James Morcan | 7757 comments Hi Rosalie

Yep, Mozart was indeed playing/composing young but the key point is he was pushed hard by his father from an even younger age (and even being exposed to the music while in the womb). Plus most experts now agree what Mozart was composing at that age were actually rearrangements of older composers works - his true genius abilities came later. Feel free to check out what I wrote about Mozart's childhood in this post here: https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/...

So it's not so much about the ages that kids achieve things but rather what is possible when they are exposed to certain accelerated learning techniques and/or pushed or sculpted into what we term geniuses. Similar to Mozart, videos of kids like Andre Agassi or Tiger Woods being very good sportsmen at ages as young as two is also evidence of the possibilities.

But yes, genius can also (in rarer instances) be genetic as per the example you bring up of entire families being like that. Again though, I would warn that most individuals being called "natural born geniuses" are usually not but rather moulded into being that way - and so there could still be something unusual occuring in an isolated farm family like the one you refer to.

Also, as far as the brain is concerned there could actually be more stimulation for a child in a farm environment than a city one. Austrian inventor/scientist Viktor Schauberger is an example of a great thinker who grew up in nature and very little of the regular stimulations of civilized society.


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