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Cousin Bette
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2018/19 Group Reads - Archives > Cousin Bette Reading Schedule

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message 1: by Gem , Moderator (last edited Sep 15, 2018 06:33PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Gem  | 794 comments Mod
Unfortunately, my copy (Penguin Classics 2004 Edition) of Cousin Bette has no chapter headings. One of the other mods (thank you Candace!) has a copy that does. So for those who have chapters in there book this will be easy, for us that don't it's going to be a challenge. I'll give as much information below as I can in order to help you identify where we are leaving off and picking up the next week.

______________________________________________
Week 1 (Sept 9 - 15)
Chapters 1 - 6

The last paragraph of week 1 reading:

Pgs 11 - 72 in the Penguin Classics 2004 Edition
(ISBN-13: 978-0-14-044160-4)

"Here is the story of the events which brought about the alliance of feminine energy and masculine weakness - a kind of reversal of attributes said to be not uncommon in Poland."

-or (a different translation)-

Pgs 1 - 64 in The Modern Library Edition

"Here is the story of the events to which the marriage of this feminine energy with that masculine weakness was due-a kind of reversal of roles said to be not uncommon in Poland."
______________________________________________
Week 2 (Sept 16 - 22)
Chapters 7 - 13

The last paragraph of week 2 reading:

Pgs 72 - 143 in the Penguin Classics Edition

"At this point it must be explained how Monsieur le Baron Hulot had managed to raise the money for Hortense's dowry, and meet the frightening expenses of the delightful flat in which Madame Marneffe was to be installed. The talent shown in his financial manipulations was of the kind that always guides spendthrifts and passion-driven men among the quagmires, where so many perils await them. The devil looks after his own, and to his powers are due those tours de force sometimes achieved by ambitious men, sensualists, and all the other subjects of his kingdom."

-or-

Pgs 64 - 136 in The Modern Library Edition

“We must explain how Baron Hulot has managed to raise the money for Hortense’s dowry, and at the same time to meet the enormous expense of the charming flat into which Madame Marneffe was soon to move........or for that matter all servants of the devil, sometimes manage to carry off.”
______________________________________________
Week 3 (Sept 23 - 29)
Chapters 8 - 20

The last paragraph of week 3 reading:

Pgs 143 - 212 in the Penguin Classics Edition

" 'Wait a moment, my tigress!" asid Valerie, laughing. 'Your shawl is crooked. ... After three years you still don't know how to wear a shal, in spite of all my lessons - and you apsire to be Madame la Marechale Hulot!"

-or-

Pgs 136 - 205 in The Modern Library Edition

Week three p. 136-205 Chapters 8 to 20. Last par. “Wait a moment, my dear tigress!” Said Valer, smiling.....you will never be Madame las Marechale Hulot!”
______________________________________________
Week 4 (Sept 30 - Oct 6)
Chapters 21 - 25

The last paragraph of week 4 reading:

Pgs 212 - 272 in the Penguin Classics Edition

"This sketch gives innocent souls some faint idea of the various havocs that the Madame Marneffes of this world may wreak in families, and by what means they can strike at poor virtuous wives, apparently so far beyond their reach. If we consider how such evils may affect the hightest level of society, that about the throne, we realize the price paid for kings' mistresses, and can estimate the debt of gratitude a nation owes its sovereigns who set an example in moral conduct and proper family life."

-or-

Pgs 206 - 267 in The Modern Library Edition

This sketch will enable innocent readers to divine the various ravages that the Madame Marneffes bring about in a family, and the means by which they can attack poor virtuous wives,.......a nation owes to those sovereigns who set an example of well-conducted domestic life.
______________________________________________
Week 5 (Oct 7 - Oct 13)
Chapters 26 - 30

The last paragraph of week 5 reading:

Pgs 272 - 330 in the Penguin Classics Edition

"Of all the kinds of political rumours the most full of pitfalls for opposition newspapers is the official rumour. However wary journalists may be, the skilful leakage of new may make the acquiescent of unconscious mouthpeices of men like Claude Vignon who have left journalism for the higher spheres or politics. It takes a journalist to make use of a journal for an undisclosed purpose. So to misquote Voltaire, we may say: The people vainly take the Paris new for truth."

-or-

Pgs 267 - 327 in The Modern Library Edition

"Of all kinds of rumors the most dangerous for the opposition newspapers is the official rumor.....It takes a journalis to circumvent a newspaper. So it may be said, to misquote Voltaire, that. Le fait-Paris n’nest past ce qu’un vain peuple pense."
______________________________________________
Week 6 (Oct 14 - Oct 20)
Chapters 31 - 34

The last paragraph of week 6 reading:

Pgs 331 - 392 in the Penguin Classics Edition

" 'What cool effrontery!' said Hulot to himself, as he bowed his pretended client out."

-or-

Pgs 327-388 “in The Modern Library Edition

"What nerve!” thought Hulot, as he bowed out his alleged client.”
______________________________________________
Week 7 (Oct 21- Oct 27)
Chapters 35 - 38

The last paragraph of week 7 reading:

Pgs 392 - 444 in the Penguin Classics Edition

" 'Parents can oppose their children's marriages, but children have no way of preventing the follies of parents in their second childhood,' said Maitre Hulot to Maitre Popinot, second son of the former Minsister of Commerce, and a fellow lawyer, who had spoken to him of that marriage."

-or-

Pgs 388 - 440 in The Modern Library Edition

“Parents can oppose the marriage of their children, but children cannot prevent the follies of parents in their second childhood.”.......


message 2: by Brian E (last edited Sep 02, 2018 09:22AM) (new)

Brian E Reynolds | 754 comments I'm busy with too many current September reads and thought I'd have to pass on this but, since this goes into mid-late October I can include it in my October reads.
Yay!! Now to find a good translation with chapters, if possible.
Besides the Penguin and Modern Library editions, I'm seriously considering the Oxford World Classic edition.


message 3: by Deborah, Moderator (new)

Deborah (deborahkliegl) | 4497 comments Mod
Brian wrote: "I'm busy with too many current September reads and thought I'd have to pass on this but, since this goes into mid-late October I can include it in my October reads.
Yay!! Now to find a good transla..."


I enjoy both the penguin and the Oxford classic editions. I find the do a lovely job


message 4: by Brian E (new)

Brian E Reynolds | 754 comments ⊱✿Gem✿⊰ wrote: "Unfortunately, my copy (Penguin Classics 2004 Edition) of Cousin Bette has no chapter headings. One of the other mods (thank you Candace!) has a copy that does. So for those who have chapters in th..."

I just received my Oxford World Classic edition today. It has a NOTE ON THE TEXT that may give some insight into why some editions have no chapter headings:

"In 1847 it was published as a book by CHLENDOWSKI and in 1848 it was published as Volume XVII of 'Comedie humaine' (the FURNE edition), the last to appear in Balzac's lifetime.
This is the text that is translated here, but the chapter and paragraph divisions of the CHLENDOWSKI edition, which were suppressed in the FURNE edition to save space, are reintroduced for the convenience of the reader."

So It appears that the FURNE edition is used for many translations and the FURNE had removed the original chapter headings just to save money. It helps to know that the Chapter divisions were originally by Balzac and not merely added later by someone else. They were re-added not just added.


message 5: by Christopher (new) - added it

Christopher (Donut) | 150 comments Brian wrote: "⊱So It appears that the FURNE edition is used for many translations and the FURNE had removed the original chapter headings just to save money. It helps to know that the Chapter divisions were originally by Balzac and not merely added later by someone else. They were re-added not just added. ..."

Yes, and it's feast or famine, because there are something like 137 chapters.

Note: "to save money" means to reduce not just the cost of the edition, but doubtless the price of the edition.




message 6: by Brian E (last edited Sep 19, 2018 10:32AM) (new)

Brian E Reynolds | 754 comments Christopher, that is a beautiful book. Is it from a printing with more than one novel is a book? Tell some details.

Also, I do see the advantages of a lower cost, lower price book. I like chapter divisions, but I was concerned about reading some 'changed' version of the book. It's nice that both book versions are natural.

But, 137 chapters is truly an amount to (more) fatten me! Some are only a page or so. Hopefully, the chapter heading descriptions won't have too many spoilers, another problem with pre-20th century novels at times.

On the bright side, I'll have many good break points and also be able to say "Oh boy, I read 10 chapters today!"


message 7: by Christopher (new) - added it

Christopher (Donut) | 150 comments Brian wrote: "Christopher, that is a beautiful book. Is it from a printing with more than one novel is a book? Tell some details.

Also, I do see the advantages of a lower cost, lower price book. I like chapter ..."


I just grabbed that photo off the Web. I believe the Furne edition was sold in pamphlet-size installments, which the purchaser was then supposed to have bound.

I agree with you about "I read 10 chapters today," and I have both the Oxford p.b. and the (fre)e-book on Kindle (with no breaks).

I was reading the Kindle edition, but maybe I will switch.


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