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Creative Ink, Flashy Fiction: Flash Fiction Anthology - Book 1
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message 1: by Theodore (last edited Aug 08, 2018 05:59AM) (new)

Theodore Cohen (theodorejeromecohen) | 1419 comments Hey, Gang...

Between February, 2018 and this month, I published six books in this anthology series, and on every one of them, CreateSpace FAILED to set the percentage of pages to be shown on their LookInside feature. I had recently called the KDP people (which had been showing something under 10%) and increased the number to 20% (have had problems with the LookInside feature on the Kindle side before), but I was surprised when I saw barely anything being displayed on the paperback editions.

If you publish with CreateSpace, check what's being shown on the LookInside feature of your paperback editions. If it's not what you want, call CreateSpace and get it changed. Even so, it can take 2-3 weeks after your call for the changes to be see on Amazon.com.


message 2: by Eldon (new)

Eldon Farrell | 285 comments Theodore wrote: "Hey, Gang...

Between February, 2018 and this month, I published six books in this anthology series, and on every one of them, CreateSpace FAILED to set the percentage of pages to be shown on their..."


Beginning of the end for Createspace :(


message 3: by Theodore (new)

Theodore Cohen (theodorejeromecohen) | 1419 comments Eldon wrote: "Theodore wrote: "Hey, Gang...

Between February, 2018 and this month, I published six books in this anthology series, and on every one of them, CreateSpace FAILED to set the percentage of pages to ..."


Actually not. The problem was rectified within a few days. I was quite surprised.

To boot, I just had another paperback released on August 5th, and have two more in the wings (for September 5th and October 5th). I have seen nothing in my interactions with CS that are any different from past years.


message 4: by Carole (new)

Carole P. Roman | 4603 comments Mod
I just moved all of the books to KDP print. I heard they will make everyone change sometime in November and I wanted to avoid having issues. It took over three months to move all the books.


message 5: by Alex (new)

Alex Carver | 4626 comments Carole wrote: "I just moved all of the books to KDP print. I heard they will make everyone change sometime in November and I wanted to avoid having issues. It took over three months to move all the books."

I'm worried about this, but also not worried since I barely sell 1 PB a month across all my titles.


message 6: by Theodore (last edited Aug 14, 2018 01:13PM) (new)

Theodore Cohen (theodorejeromecohen) | 1419 comments Carole wrote: "I just moved all of the books to KDP print. I heard they will make everyone change sometime in November and I wanted to avoid having issues. It took over three months to move all the books."

I still find it difficult to believe, from a business standpoint, that given the millions (!) of paperback books out there, and the opportunity cost (read: risk) to Amazon, that Amazon is going to require its authors to move their books. It would make much more sense for CS to be subsumed within KDP, and the paperback books on CS to simply be moved "wholesale" to KDP without so much as a hiccup. But what do I know? In the meantime, given the number of paperback books I sell (like virtually none), I'm in no hurry whatsoever to spend my time shifting them to KDP.


message 7: by Margaret (new)

Margaret Standafer | 87 comments Carole wrote: "I just moved all of the books to KDP print. I heard they will make everyone change sometime in November and I wanted to avoid having issues. It took over three months to move all the books."

Carole,
Have you seen a print copy using KDP? Is there a difference in look, quality, etc.? I have my paperbacks with Createspace and am writing the last in my series. I'm worried that it will look different than the previous books.


message 8: by Carole (new)

Carole P. Roman | 4603 comments Mod
Nah- they look the same.


message 9: by Eldon (new)

Eldon Farrell | 285 comments Carole wrote: "Nah- they look the same."

Really? I heard KDP had quality issues. Is that just a nasty rumour?


message 10: by D.J. (new)

D.J. Cooper | 1028 comments Mine look ok.


message 11: by Anita (new)

Anita Dickason (anitadickason) | 211 comments All of my books have been moved to KDP, and I ordered copies of all three. In comparing to what I have on hand from Createspace, there is no difference in the quality.


message 12: by Anita (new)

Anita Dickason (anitadickason) | 211 comments Theodore wrote: "Carole wrote: "I just moved all of the books to KDP print. I heard they will make everyone change sometime in November and I wanted to avoid having issues. It took over three months to move all the..."

I was told by a representative at Createspace that authors will have an option to move the books themselves. If they don't, then Createspace will do the transfer. The issue is that KDP has a stricter error policy than Createspace which could result in the book being rejected. I had that problem when I transferred my first novel. I had included an excerpt from the second book at the end and started the page numbers over. While this was acceptable to Createspace and IngramSpark it wasn't with KDP. I had to resubmit the manual and change the page numbers.


message 13: by Anita (new)

Anita Dickason (anitadickason) | 211 comments Theodore wrote: "Hey, Gang...

Between February, 2018 and this month, I published six books in this anthology series, and on every one of them, CreateSpace FAILED to set the percentage of pages to be shown on their..."


I checked the books I have on KDP. With the kindle version, the first five chapters can be read in the Look Inside Feature. The print version has less than a chapter that is available.


message 14: by Carole (new)

Carole P. Roman | 4603 comments Mod
I had to hire a formatter to redo all the illustrated books. They kept rejecting the manuscript. The dimensions were off and I had to get ben’s wife the redo most of them. We are almost finished I didn’t want to get lost when everything was transferred over


message 15: by Theodore (last edited Aug 15, 2018 05:20AM) (new)

Theodore Cohen (theodorejeromecohen) | 1419 comments Anita wrote: "Theodore wrote: "Hey, Gang...

Between February, 2018 and this month, I published six books in this anthology series, and on every one of them, CreateSpace FAILED to set the percentage of pages to ..."


I can't recall what the nominal values are for KDP and CS (10% or 20%), but the fact is, you can call them and get them set to anything you want. In the cases I was dealing with, CS had failed to set even the barest minimum of pages (for some unknown reason). Everything has been resolved now...in fact, the problem with all six books was resolved within 24 hours.


message 16: by Dale (new)

Dale Lehman (dalelehman) | 1734 comments Theodore wrote: "I still find it difficult to believe, from a business standpoint, that given the millions (!) of paperback books out there, and the opportunity cost (read: risk) to Amazon, that Amazon is going to require its authors to move their books. It would make much more sense for CS to be subsumed within KDP, and the paperback books on CS to simply be moved "wholesale" to KDP without so much as a hiccup."

Software developer hat on

It may not be that simple. If the two systems have differing technical underpinnings, it could require writing some fairly complex data conversions, then testing and running them. There is a lot of risk involved in this kind of process. Even a small error could potentially affect millions of titles, tick off their authors, and inconvenience huge numbers of customers.

I used to do this sort of thing regularly for financial customers. It took two or three developers, two or three customer service reps, and several subject matter experts from the customer four or so months to write and test the conversion software. In the end, there were usually a few problems to be worked out in the days following conversion, although rarely were they too significant. Nevertheless, this was a small effort compared to what Amazon might have to do.

"Seamless" always sounds so easy, as it's meant to for the end user. But making it seamless often involves significant effort. And if you make a mistake in the process . . . kaboom!

That's probably why they're having authors manually make the move. No cost to them, and any mistakes are owned by the authors themselves.

Which is not to say I necessarily disagree with you. I'm sure Amazon has the resources to automate the process. But it is risky and gives them zero return on investment.


message 17: by Theodore (new)

Theodore Cohen (theodorejeromecohen) | 1419 comments Dale wrote: "Theodore wrote: "I still find it difficult to believe, from a business standpoint, that given the millions (!) of paperback books out there, and the opportunity cost (read: risk) to Amazon, that Am..."

You have to wonder why they made the requirements for KDP paperbacks different from those used for CS paperbacks if they've served Amazon so well for so long.

The decision to force authors to make the changes, of course, is the right one from a business standpoint. This might also be a way for Amazon to clear out the "underbrush"...that is to say, the rejection of CS books that aren't sponge-worthy would eliminate a lot of clutter on Amazon.com and free up a ton of storage space.

As for me, if they reject any of my paperback books and the fixes aren't easy, then the paperbacks will go out-of-print.

Life is short. And you know how it ends.


message 18: by Eldon (new)

Eldon Farrell | 285 comments Theodore wrote: "the rejection of CS books that aren't sponge-worthy..."

LOL :)


Sam (Rescue Dog Mom, Writer, Hugger) (sammydogs) | 968 comments Eldon wrote: "Theodore wrote: "the rejection of CS books that aren't sponge-worthy..."

LOL :)"


Theodore, I just fell off my chair laughing. Thank you, I need a good laugh today! Hugs


message 20: by Theodore (new)

Theodore Cohen (theodorejeromecohen) | 1419 comments That's me, the court jester. After you get to a certain age, a lot of things just don't seem to matter much anymore.

Which reminds me of that old joke about the elderly man who went for a job interview.

"What would you say is your greatest weakness?"

"Honesty."

"Well, that's interesting, but I don't think honesty is a weakness."

"I don't give a flying f--- what you think."


message 21: by Eldon (new)

Eldon Farrell | 285 comments Theodore wrote: "That's me, the court jester. After you get to a certain age, a lot of things just don't seem to matter much anymore.

Which reminds me of that old joke about the elderly man who went for a job inte..."


Hahahaha!!


message 22: by Theodore (new)

Theodore Cohen (theodorejeromecohen) | 1419 comments Eldon wrote: "Theodore wrote: "That's me, the court jester. After you get to a certain age, a lot of things just don't seem to matter much anymore.

Which reminds me of that old joke about the elderly man who we..."


My guess: he didn't get the job. (;>)


Sam (Rescue Dog Mom, Writer, Hugger) (sammydogs) | 968 comments Theodore wrote: "Eldon wrote: "Theodore wrote: "That's me, the court jester. After you get to a certain age, a lot of things just don't seem to matter much anymore.

Which reminds me of that old joke about the elde..."


Thank you very much, Theodore. You've got me laughing through my tears, which is a good thing. Hugs


message 24: by Theodore (new)

Theodore Cohen (theodorejeromecohen) | 1419 comments Sam (Rescue Dog Mom, Writer, Hugger) wrote: "Theodore wrote: "Eldon wrote: "Theodore wrote: "That's me, the court jester. After you get to a certain age, a lot of things just don't seem to matter much anymore.

Which reminds me of that old jo..."


I live to make you laugh (and, of course, to entertain my wife of 54 years, who has only let me live this long, she tells me, because she's not quite finished with me yet).


message 25: by Dale (new)

Dale Lehman (dalelehman) | 1734 comments Theodore wrote: "You have to wonder why they made the requirements for KDP paperbacks different from those used for CS paperbacks if they've served Amazon so well for so long.
"


That I don't know. I've never worked with CS.

Theodore wrote: "...the rejection of CS books that aren't sponge-worthy would eliminate a lot of clutter on Amazon.com and free up a ton of storage space."

Nah, the storage space isn't likely the issue. A million books at an average of 3MB per book would only be about 3 terabytes. You can get laptops with terabyte hard drives.

Sound files take up a lot more space than books, and videos take up a lot more than sound files. And YouTube has over 7 billion videos on line . . . so far.


Sam (Rescue Dog Mom, Writer, Hugger) (sammydogs) | 968 comments Theodore wrote: "Sam (Rescue Dog Mom, Writer, Hugger) wrote: "Theodore wrote: "Eldon wrote: "Theodore wrote: "That's me, the court jester. After you get to a certain age, a lot of things just don't seem to matter m..."

However wonderful, and very funny. Life with you both must be fabulous. Thanks again. Hugs


message 27: by Angel (last edited Sep 26, 2018 02:28PM) (new)

Angel | 722 comments Everyone if some of you had any doubt, it is official. And I'm so glad I already moved my books to KDP both paperback and Kindle before they could move them. Just got this email from Createspace and KDP confirming it. KDP and Createspace are becoming one service. I knew it was going to happen. That's why I moved my books in April of this year.

CSP Header


KDP Header






Hello,

We’re excited to announce that CreateSpace (CSP) and Kindle Direct Publishing (KDP) will become one service. As a reminder, KDP now offers Expanded Distribution to sell your paperbacks to physical bookstores in the US, as well as the ability to sell your paperback books on Amazon.ca and Amazon.com.au (Amazon.mx coming soon). With these features, KDP’s paperback distribution will be on par with CreateSpace’s distribution. KDP also offers features that aren’t available on CreateSpace. These include the ability to purchase ads to promote paperbacks on Amazon.com and locally printed author copies in Europe.

As a result of these enhancements to KDP and our ongoing efforts to provide a more seamless experience for managing your paperback and digital books, CreateSpace and KDP will become one service. On KDP, your paperbacks will still be printed in the same facilities, on the same printers, and by the same people as they were on CreateSpace.

In the coming weeks, we’ll start automatically moving your CreateSpace books to KDP. Your books will remain available for sale throughout the move and you’ll continue to earn royalties. Once we begin this process you’ll be unable to edit existing titles or create new titles on CreateSpace. To learn more about the move and review the latest, visit here.

If you have a release planned soon or you would like to start the move yourself, you can move your entire CreateSpace catalog to KDP in just a few steps. To get started on your move to KDP, log in to your CreateSpace Member Dashboard. During this transition, you can contact KDP customer support by email and access phone support in English.

There are a few payment and printing fee differences associated with the move. Any royalties earned while your books are on CreateSpace will be paid according the CreateSpace's payment schedule, 30 days after the end of the month in which they were earned. After you move your books to KDP, new royalties earned will be paid on KDP's payment schedule. KDP pays royalties on a monthly basis 60 days after the end of the month in which they were earned. As a result, you’ll be paid in October for any royalties earned in September on CreateSpace and be paid in November for any royalties earned on KDP. In addition, some low-page count books will see an increase in printing fees when they are printed in the UK and EU. We've already sent an email to the small number of accounts affected by this change. Learn more about KDP’s printing costs here.

We’ll be in touch with more updates in the coming weeks. It is still Day 1 for independent publishing. As Amazon’s recent shareholder letter noted, there are more than a 1,000 authors who earn more than a $100,000 a year from their work with us. We could not be more optimistic about the future of independent publishing and this change will allow us to innovate faster for you.

Best Regards,
The CreateSpace and KDP Team


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