YA LGBT Books discussion

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Book Related Banter > Book or Kindle - what do you really think?

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message 1: by Meyer (new)

Meyer | 14 comments How many people use kindle and how many can ONLY have a book?

I flit between the two.

Am considering publishing a kindle book but how many potential readers will I cut out?!!?


message 2: by Kaje (new)

Kaje Harper | 16516 comments I read both, but for LGBTQ I read mainly on ebook (Nook and kindle) a lot, because so much of the good stuff is either hard to find or expensive in paper.

We were having this debate on FB about YA and whether a book that was only in ebook could reach a big enough audience. And how to find that audience. Libraries and schools and people buying for teens, and GSA/PFLAG spaces all tend toward paper. And ebooks are hard to buy without a credit card.

I'll be interested to see the answers you get.


message 3: by Sammy Goode (new)

Sammy Goode | 5380 comments I only buy hard copies of books I absolutely love. That way I’m sure to have them should kindle decide to delete them which Amazon has been known to do. I love the ease of my kindle because I can read at night without a cumbersome book light.


message 4: by Kimberly (new)

Kimberly (skimmer) | 2 comments So, I literally have thousands of books within 10 feet of me. Books under the bed, on the wall, in built-ins in the hallway. I love books. The covers. Pretty title pages. Signs I have read and loved a page before.

But...kindle all the way. Reading glasses suck. #lifepast40


message 5: by J.L. (new)

J.L. Frederick | 15 comments I don’t think I have a preference, really. In fact, I bought an iPad mainly so I could read on it—easier for me to download books than on a e-reader. I’ve never had an intense desire to own hundreds of books, and I’m not too attached to physical books, I think. I don’t smell them or anything, like some people (online) say they do.

Really, I just read both.


message 6: by Benjamin (new)

Benjamin Appleby-Dean (benjaminappleby-dean) | 69 comments I mostly buy physical books (although I still buy ebooks occasionally), but I only publish on Kindle/Smashwords at present.
Both have advantages - physical books have a more satisfying weight and texture, but ebooks are good for some rarer books or to allow authors of more niche genres to flourish.


message 7: by Kari (new)

Kari Trenten (cauldronkeeper) | 76 comments I'm torn...I love books for the feel, texture, smell, the sheer delight of seeing their spines on a shelf fills me with joy.

My Kindle is a great way to take a library with me wherever I go. Plus I don't have to worry as much about space being taken up by too many books.


message 8: by Rez (new)

Rez Delnava (rez_delnava) | 583 comments I love both, but ebooks have an edge simply because I can pack a library's worth of books on my phone to have something to read at all times.

But on the subject of Kindle specifically, I avoid it like the plague. Personally, I will never put my work on their platform because the closed ecosystem and proprietary format means they can make people's books disappear at any time for any reason. I will always favor purchasing from the writer's/indie press' own website, Smashwords, or Google Play. I've often skipped books I would have otherwise picked up simply because it was only available on Kindle and didn't have an ePub edition.


message 9: by Meyer (new)

Meyer | 14 comments the closed ecosystem and proprietary format means they can make people's books disappear at any time for any reason."

Hey - what does this mean specifically?


message 10: by Iamshadow (last edited Aug 06, 2018 04:03AM) (new)

Iamshadow | 334 comments Meyer wrote: " the closed ecosystem and proprietary format means they can make people's books disappear at any time for any reason."

Hey - what does this mean specifically?"


You don't buy a book from Amazon kindle, you essentially buy the right to read it but don't own it, and they can revoke access at any time. It's why I don't get anything except free books through kindle. I resent someone taking back something I feel I've paid for in good faith. It's like someone walking into my house and stealing a book off my shelf because they don't stock it in their shop anymore. Utter crap.


message 11: by Iamshadow (new)

Iamshadow | 334 comments Meyer wrote: "How many people use kindle and how many can ONLY have a book?

I flit between the two.

Am considering publishing a kindle book but how many potential readers will I cut out?!!?"


I read both physical and digital, mainly because it's hard to knit while holding a book!

I think that if there's a way to put up a version of an ebook that is DRM free and not locked to kindle, that's a lot more appealing to me, personally. I read using Freda+ on laptop, tablet and phone and that opens a number of different unlocked formats.


message 12: by Meyer (new)

Meyer | 14 comments Iamshadow wrote: "Meyer wrote: " the closed ecosystem and proprietary format means they can make people's books disappear at any time for any reason."

Hey - what does this mean specifically?"

You don't buy a book ..."


Thanks for replying!! How scary! why would they do that?


message 13: by Iamshadow (new)

Iamshadow | 334 comments Meyer wrote: "Thanks for replying!! How scary! why would they do that? "

Money.


message 14: by Isabelle (new)

Isabelle Jay (cheoljay) | 7 comments I have a hard time reading ebooks so if I really don't have to do that I will pick the book and read that. If it only exists as an ebook it have to be a book I REALLY want to read, else I will just skip reading it.


message 15: by Brooklyn (new)

Brooklyn Graham | 56 comments This viewpoint is coming strictly as an independent author. For those writers that are new to the industry, and unable to convince a publisher to take on their work, (something that is growing increasingly difficult) , publishing their work in e-book format is the only viable avenue to get their work out there. The cost of printing good quality paperbacks is prohibitive at best. As a reader, I love the printed page. There's something physically enticing about holding a book in your hand, turning real pages, and knowing that it's there without the added burden of an electronic device. As a self published author, I have found that the trend is towards e-books, and have a stack of my own books in evidence to that fact. They're for sale, but I mostly give them away to friends. When e-books are on sale at a fraction of the cost of paperbacks, even with the transient nature of the things, it's too much of a temptation, and an all too easy alternative.
Brook


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