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All the Light We Cannot See
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Book of the Month > August BOTM: All The Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr

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Lisa (lml369_07) | 1048 comments Mod
Hi everyone!

We have our winner for August's BOTM! This month we will be reading All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr! This has been on my TBR for a while now and I'm excited to finally get to read it, especially because I get to share it with all of you! Please share your thoughts below!

Happy Reading!


Sonali (sonalipawar26) This book is absolutely amazing!


Lisa (lml369_07) | 1048 comments Mod
So far I have loved it! I think I am going to love this book!


Emily (RecordofaBibliophile) (recordofabibliophile) I'm finding it so hard to get into.. I started reading it before it was announced as BOTM and I'm not even 100 pages in. I have been busy this month with work but I'm still unsure about it.
Also, I don't usually read this genre either so that has probably been another factor... I'm going to keep trying though!


message 5: by Agnese (last edited Aug 13, 2018 06:27AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Agnese | 12 comments Emily (RecordofaBibliophile) wrote: "I'm finding it so hard to get into.. I started reading it before it was announced as BOTM and I'm not even 100 pages in. I have been busy this month with work but I'm still unsure about it.
Also, I..."


I struggled at first to get into the book as well. However, once I got past the first quarter of the book or so, I couldn't put it down. The story becomes more gripping. I hope you will like it at the end.


Agnese | 12 comments Thanks for another great recommendation. I'm almost finished with the book and I don't think I have read anything like this before. The language is phenomenal and the story is interesting as well. I was wondering how this story could translate into a film. I think it would be very difficult as a lot of parts are about sensations, associations and memories - not something that easily translates into a film narrative. But them some parts reminded me lot of some of Jean-Pierre Jeunet's films (Amelie, The City of Lost Children) - such as saturated colours, simultaneous actions etc. Do you think this book could be translated into a film?


QueenAmidala28 Emily (RecordofaBibliophile) wrote: "I'm finding it so hard to get into.. I started reading it before it was announced as BOTM and I'm not even 100 pages in. I have been busy this month with work but I'm still unsure about it.
Also, I..."

Emily May I suggest Anthony Doerr's autobiography (very short and sweet) Four Seasons in Rome On Twins, Insomnia, and the Biggest Funeral in the History of the World by Anthony Doerr . It's basically the author telling the reasons behind writing TLWCS. After reading it, I saw his writing with a whole new lens. TLWCS is full of history so sometimes it's better to check out the background story on YouTube or short stories online. I hope you enjoy. Otherwise don't push it. Come back to it in a few years :) That's the great thing about reading!


Simone (simoontje) | 2 comments I loved it, it is a whole new way of telling the story of the war. However I listened to an audiobook and at the beginning I was annoyed by the horrible pronunciations in French and German.


message 9: by Tina (new)

Tina O'reilly Just logged on to the group for the first time in ages (been on my hols!) and really interested to see this book for an August read - however, I will have to add it to my 'books to read one day soon' list and will miss out on joining in chitchat about the book this month in case I read spoilers. Great choice though (hopefully!).


Whitney (wbandel) Finally finished! I got a bit behind due to the start of the school year. I was a little apprehensive about reading this book as I just read The Book Thief earlier this year and wasn’t in a hurry to read yet another sad WW2 book.

I really enjoyed the story weaving and characters. The two kids help add more to the story than just living through a war. Without the focus on their hobbies, I probably would have found this book quite boring. The ending seems a bit lackluster, with no real conclusion. In that sense it makes me wonder what the point of it all was. Perhaps it’s a character study, but in that regard I’m tired of all these what if so-and-so lived during WW2. I wish we could have seen these characters in more of a unique setting. Despite all that I did enjoy the book overall.

I didn’t realize the author had an interview, I think I’ll go find it and see how it changes my perception.


message 11: by Ruby (last edited Sep 08, 2018 06:30PM) (new) - rated it 3 stars

Ruby | 10 comments I have a question. Why did Marie-Laure try to get rid of the miniature house and set it in the water? Also, why would have Werner taken it? I just suddenly wondered...so I thought I'd ask here.


message 12: by Lisa (new) - rated it 4 stars

Lisa (lml369_07) | 1048 comments Mod
I looked around as I have wondered the same thing and I found this post on another page on GR

From: Sam Abney
This answer contains spoilers… (view spoiler)


Emily (RecordofaBibliophile) (recordofabibliophile) Ruby wrote: "I have a question. Why did Marie-Laure try to get rid of the miniature house and set it in the water? Also, why would have Werner taken it? I just suddenly wondered...so I thought I'd ask here."
The house had the stone in it, which Werner had taken out and put in the ocean (i'm assuming), and maybe he went back for it, to have something of her to remind him?


Whitney (wbandel) Emily (RecordofaBibliophile) wrote: "Ruby wrote: "I have a question. Why did Marie-Laure try to get rid of the miniature house and set it in the water? Also, why would have Werner taken it? I just suddenly wondered...so I thought I'd ..."

I agree with Emily. Perhaps he also thought it would help reunite them again and he could return it.


message 15: by Lisa (new) - rated it 4 stars

Lisa (lml369_07) | 1048 comments Mod
I second that!


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