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Jul/Aug 18 - Milk & Honey > On the path of the Poesy' Shelf: any suggestions of volumes?

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message 1: by [deleted user] (last edited Jul 29, 2018 08:02AM) (new)

Good morning, afternoon and even evening!

To the best of my knowledge, Milk and Honey is the first volume of poetry suggested here. I devoured the pages and I repeated the same story with The Sun and Her Flowers.

On my way to walk through the subtle words of poesy, I must admit that the horizon is a bit blurry. I am wandering around the shelves with no lights and I was wondering if kind candles could carry my curiosity (and not only mine) to other books?

I will of course edit the first post for more visibility.


List:

-Corazon by Yesika Salgado (Body image, lost love, miscarriage, sexuality, home etc...)
- The anthology Women of Resistance: Poems for New Feminism by Danielle Barnhart and Iris Mahan and many contributors! (Often political, gender, sexuality, home etc...)
- Bone by Yrsa Daley-Ward (Gender, race, growing up, home etc...)
- Depression and Other Magic Tricks by Sabrina Benaim (Gender, Love, mental health)
- Rebirth by Galatea Georgiou (Poetry & Photography)
- Wild Embers by Nikita Gill (identity, empowerment and feminity)
- And Still I Rise by Maya Angelou
- When Angels Speak of Love by Bell Hooks.

Edit: That is exactly what I was looking for thanks for suggesting volumes of poetry, I am pretty sure that other members appreciate your recommendations/advice even if they do not write it ;)

Have a great day!


message 2: by Amy (new)

Amy Not entirely sure what you mean by poesy (whether it's a specific type of poetry you're after?) but I loved Corazon by Yesika Salgado. Another excellent feminist poet who deals with body image, lost love, miscarriage, sexuality and her home country in her prose.


message 3: by emma (new)

emma (inthemeantimes) | 1 comments Andrea Gibson's poetry (and videos and albums) are stunning, clever, and powerful, often discussing gender and love. So recommend.

The anthology Women of Resistance: Poems for a New Feminism is chock full of amazing poems by people who identify as women, often political and often thinking about gender, sexuality, home, etc.

Bone by Yrsa Daley-Yard also! Gender, race, growing up, home, etc.

Finally, Depression and Other Magic Tricks by Sabrina Benaim, over gender, love, and mental illness.

I'd argue that these books are just as good, if not better, than Milk and Honey. Hope you enjoy one x


message 4: by Marios (new)

Marios Thrasyvoulou | 1 comments A book to consider is "rebirth" by Galatea Georgiou. It's a honest trip to inner fights and resolution. Quite simple, deeply emotional and with some pop culture references, I found it to capture well the emotional growth of a contemporary young adult woman.


message 5: by [deleted user] (new)

emma wrote: "Andrea Gibson's poetry (and videos and albums) are stunning, clever, and powerful, often discussing gender and love. So recommend.

The anthology Women of Resistance: Poems for a New Feminism is ch..."


Do you have specific recommendation about Andrea Gibson's books?


message 6: by Lucy (new)

Lucy | 39 comments I really enjoyed Wild Embers by Nikita Gill.

Some of the poems are short like Rupi Kaur's ones and touch upon feminism and empowerment as well. She also takes fairytales and Goddesses in Greek mythology and tells their stories from a feminist perspective through poetry.


message 7: by [deleted user] (new)

Ok, my bad I did not know people would get confuse by the utilisation of the word Poesy instead of Poetry. Now I understand some of the comments. If you think changing Poesy by Poetry in the title would be better please let me know.


message 8: by Charlene (new)

Charlene Morris | 89 comments I haven't read any of her poems yet, but there is Anne Sexton. The complete poetry was published in 1981.

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2...


message 9: by Pam (new)

Pam | 1091 comments Mod
Florian wrote: "Ok, my bad I did not know people would get confuse by the utilisation of the word Poesy instead of Poetry. Now I understand some of the comments. If you think changing Poesy by Poetry in the title ..."

Nah! Keep it as Poesy. I can't speak for everyone, but now that I know this new word/definition, I want to use it!


message 10: by [deleted user] (new)

Pam wrote: "Florian wrote: "Ok, my bad I did not know people would get confuse by the utilisation of the word Poesy instead of Poetry. Now I understand some of the comments. If you think changing Poesy by Poet..."

Hahaha! To be honest I used Poesy because I knew it exists (of course) but mainly because it is similar to Poésie in french (my mother tongue), I guess it was unconscious. However, I'm glad that some people discovered a new word, usually it is me who is learning new english words, that is funny isn't it? :)


message 11: by Dalma (new)

Dalma Szentpály (snowithish13) | 4 comments Reading Rupi Kaur's volume really inspired me to check out other contemporary, online poets' work. There are amazing sites and incredible authors like Nayyirah Waheed and Amanda Lovelace or Atticus. I have written a longer blog post about how they achieved popularity and how you can follow in their footsteps. You can check it out here: https://publishdrive.com/publishing-p...


message 12: by Dalma (new)

Dalma Szentpály (snowithish13) | 4 comments Emma wrote: "Dalma wrote: "Reading Rupi Kaur's volume really inspired me to check out other contemporary, online poets' work. There are amazing sites and incredible authors like Nayyirah Waheed and Amanda Lovel..."
Hi Emma! You are right, I was not making myself clear. Actually, all of these poets started out online (Amanda Lovelace on Tumblr originally) and then either they self-published their own volume of poetry or were offered a book deal by an indie publisher like Andrews McMeel Publishing.


message 13: by Pam (new)

Pam | 1091 comments Mod
Emma wrote: "Dalma wrote: "Emma wrote: "Dalma wrote: "Reading Rupi Kaur's volume really inspired me to check out other contemporary, online poets' work. There are amazing sites and incredible authors like Nayyi..."

How true!

I wonder if this is where the "Tumblr Poetry" title and slur come from. And if poets like Lovelace see this as an accusation or as empowering.


message 14: by [deleted user] (last edited Aug 18, 2018 05:37AM) (new)

Pam wrote: "Emma wrote: "Dalma wrote: "Emma wrote: "Dalma wrote: "Reading Rupi Kaur's volume really inspired me to check out other contemporary, online poets' work. There are amazing sites and incredible autho..."

Good point, I have not thought about that :) I suppose "Trumblr Poetry" may be perceived as empowering may be perceived as accusation or pejorative. I am assuming that it mainly depends on people. For example if substantial group of people or even a small group starts using it in a bad way it will probably fade the original meaning of Trumblr Poetry. Right now I am thinking about street art, it is a terminology of course but it may be empowering or tarnishing I suppose :) ok it is not really related to poetry... Well in some way it is though ^^


message 15: by Pam (new)

Pam | 1091 comments Mod
Florian wrote: "Pam wrote: "Emma wrote: "Dalma wrote: "Emma wrote: "Dalma wrote: "Reading Rupi Kaur's volume really inspired me to check out other contemporary, online poets' work. There are amazing sites and incr..."

Mmm good comparison. From "hood graffiti to street art" a funny twist of the brand and you go from a thug vandalizing property to Banksy.


message 16: by Lianne (new)

Lianne Burwell (lianneb) | 4 comments Note: Nikita Gill's Wild Embers is fantastic, and her latest book, Fierce Fairytales, just came out this week in North America. I picked up my copy yesterday.


message 17: by [deleted user] (new)

I agree Wild Ember is good ;)


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