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Sabayang Pagbabasa > August 2014: THE TRILOGY OF SAINT LAZARUS by National Artist Cirilo F. Bautista

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message 1: by K.D., Founder (new)

K.D. Absolutely (oldkd) | 6607 comments Mod
Our tribute to the newest addition to the roster of National Artists for Literature - CIRILO F. BAUTISTA

We will be reading this trilogy, English epic poem, THE TRILOGY OF SAINT LAZARUS.

Who is Cirilo F. Bautista?

Read on...

Cirilo F. Bautista (born 1941) is a multi-awarded Filipino poet, fictionist, critic and writer of nonfiction. He received his basic education from Legarda Elementary School (1st Honorable Mention, 1954) and Mapa High School (Valedictorian, 1959). He received his degrees in AB Literature from the University of Santo Tomas (magna cum laude, 1963), MA Literature from St. Louis University, Baguio City (magna cum laude, 1968), and Doctor of Arts in Language and Literature from De La Salle University-Manila (1990). He received a fellowship to attend the International Writing Program at the University of Iowa (1968–1969) and was awarded an honorary degree—the only Filipino to have been so honored there.

Bautista taught creative writing and literature at St. Louis University (1963–1968) and the University of Santo Tomas (1969–1970) before moving to De La Salle University-Manila in 1970. He is also a co-founding member of the Philippine Literary Arts Council (PLAC) and a member of the Manila Critics Circle, Philippine Center of International PEN and the Philippine Writers Academy.

Bautista has also received Carlos Palanca Memorial Awards (for poetry, fiction and essay in English and Filipino) as well as Philippines Free Press Awards for Fiction, Manila Critics' Circle National Book Awards, Gawad Balagtas from the Unyon ng mga Manunulat ng Pilipinas, the Pablo Roman Prize for the Novel, and the highest accolades from the City of Manila, Quezon City and Iligan City. Bautista was hailed in 1993 as Makata ng Taon by the Komisyon ng mga Wika ng Pilipinas for winning the poetry contest sponsored by the government. The last part of his epic trilogy The Trilogy of Saint Lazarus, entitled Sunlight on Broken Stones, won the Centennial Prize for the epic in 1998. He was an exchange professor in Waseda University and Ohio University. He became an Honorary Fellow in Creative Writing at the University of Iowa in 1969, and was the first recipient of a British Council fellowship as a creative writer at Trinity College, Cambridge in 1987.

Bautista works include Boneyard Breaking, Sugat ng Salita, The Archipelago, Telex Moon, Summer Suns, Charts, The Cave and Other Poems, Kirot ng Kataga, and Bullets and Roses: The Poetry of Amado V. Hernandez. His novel Galaw ng Asoge was published by the University of Santo Tomas Press in 2004. His latest book, Believe and Betray: New and Collected Poems, appeared in 2006, published by De La Salle University Press.

His poems have appeared in major literary journals, papers, and magazines in the Philippines and in anthologies published in the United States, Japan, the Netherlands, China, Romania, Hong Kong, Germany and Malaysia. These include: excerpts from Sunlight on Broken Stones, published in World Literature Today, USA, Spring 2000; What Rizal Told Me (poem), published in Manoa, University of Hawaii, 1997; She of the Quick Hands: My Daughter and The Seagull (poems), published in English Teacher’s Portfolio of Multicultural Activities, edited by John Cowen (New York: Simon & Schuster, 1996).

Aside from his teaching, creative and research activities as a Professor Emeritus of Literature at the College of Liberal Arts, De La Salle University-Manila, Bautista is also a columnist and literary editor of the Philippine Panorama, the Sunday Supplement of the Manila Bulletin. He is also a member of the Board of Advisers and Associate, Bienvenido Santos Creative Writing Center of De La Salle University-Manila and Senior Associate, The Center for Creative Writing and Studies of the University of Santo Tomas.


message 2: by K.D., Founder (new)

K.D. Absolutely (oldkd) | 6607 comments Mod
Cirilo F. Bautista FB: click here.

Marami pala kaming somethings in common: schools - nagaral din sya sa St. Louis Baguio at De la Salle. Parehong July ang birthdays namin. Pareho kaming taga-QC. Yong lang haha. Super talino lang nya. Magna-magna. I am not worthy of being compared to him.


message 3: by K.D., Founder (new)

K.D. Absolutely (oldkd) | 6607 comments Mod
Please read this book. I bought my copy from Robinson's Galleria NBS. Pag may nakita ako sa ibang NBS. I'll post the info there.


message 4: by K.D., Founder (last edited Aug 02, 2014 11:36PM) (new)

K.D. Absolutely (oldkd) | 6607 comments Mod
Reading Schedule:

Part 1 : The Archipelago - August 11
Part 2 : Telex Moon - August 18
Part 3 : Sunlight on Broken Stones - August 25

Interview with National Artist Cirilo F. Bautista - tentatively set on Saturday, September 6, 2014. To be confirmed soon. Watch out for announcements in this thread.


message 5: by Billy (new)

Billy Candelaria (azriel) | 293 comments Pa post pag saan pa available yan?


message 6: by Rise (new)

Rise I'll try to join you on this read, KD.


message 7: by K.D., Founder (new)

K.D. Absolutely (oldkd) | 6607 comments Mod
Billy wrote: "Pa post pag saan pa available yan?"

Sure, Billy.


message 8: by K.D., Founder (new)

K.D. Absolutely (oldkd) | 6607 comments Mod
Rise wrote: "I'll try to join you on this read, KD."

Thanks, Rise.


BookNoy (Pinoy Reads Pinoy Books) | 84 comments KD, kasabayan pala niya sila AGOS- efren abueg, rogelio ordonez,etc.kapanahunan pala niya un Kabataang Makabayan. Bagamat nagsusulat siya sa Inggles ay puro Nationalism ang tema ng kanyang sinusulat. Nahilig siya sa History at sa buhay ni Rizal kaya nagsulat siya ng Trilogy.


message 10: by K.D., Founder (new)

K.D. Absolutely (oldkd) | 6607 comments Mod
Book wrote: "KD, kasabayan pala niya sila AGOS- efren abueg, rogelio ordonez,etc.kapanahunan pala niya un Kabataang Makabayan. Bagamat nagsusulat siya sa Inggles ay puro Nationalism ang tema ng kanyang sinusula..."

Malamang nga. Pero burgis si Cirilo Bautista kasi nakatapos ng kolehiyo at mukhang super talino. Matatalino rin naman ang Agos boys pero considering na nag-construction worker si Edgardo Reyes at nagsimulang magsulat sa pamamagitan ng pencil na kailangang dugtungan ng papel para mahawakan (sobrang iksi na), do you get the picture?

O kaya nga mainam na makausap si Cirilo Bautista para malaman ang kuwento ng buhay nya. :)


message 11: by K.D., Founder (new)

K.D. Absolutely (oldkd) | 6607 comments Mod
I just finished reading the first book of the trilogy. I added it here in Goodreads. Since it was published in 1970, I could not find a good cover except this one. You may want to click and read my review.

The Archipelago by Cirilo F. Bautista
THE ARCHIPELAGO
by Cirilo F. Bautista

It is about the time when Ferdinand Magellan came to the Philippines in 1521. I am not sure from where Bautista based his narratives (told in poetry) on. I've read some of those Pigafetta accounts in one of the books I've read about Magellan maybe three years ago. But since the story is told in poems the reading is easier but not as complete and direct as when you read prose. But I think that's the whole point of being different or being creative. Bautista has a lot of talent that he opted to be different.

There are some parts in the book when he (Bautista) shifts to personal mode. Maybe he was expressing his self (what he thinks or feels) about that part in the history but sometimes, to be quite frank, I do not see the connection. Did I read it so fast to miss those connections? I dunno. I want to know what you think of that.

Questions for Book 1

1) What is your view on "Magellan discovered the Philippines" when it is very clear that the Philippines already had civilization when this Portuguese explorer came? We don't hear so and so discovered China or India, right?

2) Who killed Magellan if not Lapu-Lapu?

3) Let me know what you think of this: should we be thankful that the Spain brought Catholicism in the Philippines?


message 12: by Rise (new)

Rise I finished The Archipelago today. Very great poetry. The trilogy is a truly national epic in terms of scope, theme, and stylistic flourishes. It's obviously a labor of love having been carefully constructed over a period of years (over 3 decades!). Bautista clearly wanted to display his talent through the use of different poetic registers (sometimes narrative, sometimes dialectical like dialogues in a play), varying line lengths and divisions (long lines, short and clipped lines, lines cut at various indentations), and various points of view. The use of lines of various lengths creates a kind of symphonic diversity and makes for a dynamic rhythm and cadence. Like all the good poems, I think this was meant to be recited. It could certainly be adapted as a musical or play. I would have liked to listen to the varied sounds of this poem and see how it will be interpreted on stage, complete with costumes by Spanish conquistadors and native peoples. Some of the speakers are easily identified and recognizable. The voices are dominated by historical figures like Ferdinand Magellan (Hernando?), Miguel Lopez de Legaspi, Limahon, and Rizal. I think the epigraphs provide a clue as to what historical sources are consulted in the writing of the poem.

Will post my answers to the questions later.


message 13: by Rise (new)

Rise Answers to Book 1 Questions

1) What is your view on "Magellan discovered the Philippines" when it is very clear that the Philippines already had civilization when this Portuguese explorer came? We don't hear so and so discovered China or India, right?

The word "discovered" is a loaded word so the statement depends on one's perspective. I "discovered" Tabon Cave, for example, when I visited it a few years ago. The "archipelago" is not yet called the Philippines when Magellan came so in a way he discovered it and called it by a name, St. Lazarus.

I just read Culture and History by Nick Joaquin and I highly recommend it as a companion book to this poem. I don't agree with everything Nick wrote but his arguments are really thought provoking. He argued that the pre-Hispanic civilization in the islands are not too far advanced compared to China and India. He called it a "heritage of smallness": the Filipino works best on a small scale and by implication is unable to commit to big projects, hence, our ancestors built small boats (barangay). They also choose to work in soft, easy materials like clay, molten metal, tree bark, etc. Finally, our artifacts show that they did not develop to the next level. Our pottery are not as advanced as the Chinese porcelain. In contrast, the arrival of the Spanish brought advancements in technology that led to cultural progress. The Spanish introduced the wheel, the plow, roads and bridges, new crops (corn, tobacco, camote, coffee, guava, papaya, etc.), new livestock (horse, cow, sheep, goose), factories, paper and printing, Roman alphabet, calendar and clock, maps, painting and architecture, and food dressing (guisado) that affected our culinary culture.

2) Who killed Magellan if not Lapu-Lapu?

Not sure if Pigafetta recorded it. In any case, whether it was Lapu-Lapu or one of his men, Magellan was resisted.

3) Let me know what you think of this: should we be thankful that the Spain brought Catholicism in the Philippines?

Again, Nick Joaquin would answer with a yes. For him, the conversion to Christianity is the main event of Philippine history, for better or worse. We just have to embrace the fact that the friars and conquistadors hastened our nationalism and our socioeconomic and cultural transformation.


Tuklas Pahina (TP) | 1029 comments Answers Book 1
1. I do believed we have already our "own" civilization its just that Magellan or Spaniards use force/war to get rid of our "own" civilization and occupy conquer our land.

2. I think the ordinary warriors killed Magellan like in 300 movie it doesnt matter who killed them the point is "makapaghigante ang mga Pilipino noon". Malay nyo buhay pa si Magellan haha! vampire angt peg.

3.Based from my opinion we should be thankful for without Christianity/Catholicism we would never be Christians. Being Christian is important for our freedom and identity. Just like HISTORY all these wars, atomic bombs, science discoveries have their purpose and must be fulfilled in accordance to God's will.


message 15: by K.D., Founder (new)

K.D. Absolutely (oldkd) | 6607 comments Mod
Thank you, Rise and Po.

Rise, I agree that our pre-Hispanic civilization is smaller than those of India and China. But how was it compared to say Thailand and Indonesia?

Po, what if we became Muslims instead of Christians?


message 16: by K.D., Founder (last edited Aug 25, 2014 06:07PM) (new)

K.D. Absolutely (oldkd) | 6607 comments Mod
I just finished the second book, Telex Moon. I liked it so much especially when the subject is Leonor Rivera. You see, my interpretation is that the point-of-view is that of Jose Rizal's and this is Rizal speaking to us in this epic poem. Again, just like the first book, the poem is nicely worded and constructed (with the last line in the stanza overflowing to the first line of the next stanza) that gave the effect that the poem is continuous like the Arabian Nights.

Questions

1) Who do you think Rizal loved more: Leonor Rivera or Josephine Bracken?

2) If Rizal had the inkling that he would be killed by the Spaniards upon his return to the Philippines, why did he choose to come back?

3) What do you think: did Rizal retract his belief on Masonry and once again embrace Catholicism before he died?

4) Is it possible for a human being to have a normal blood pressure when he knows that he is about to be executed? Why?

5) Why is this entitled "Telex Moon"?


message 17: by Rise (new)

Rise K.D. wrote: "Thank you, Rise and Po.

Rise, I agree that our pre-Hispanic civilization is smaller than those of India and China. But how was it compared to say Thailand and Indonesia?

Po, what if we became Mus..."


I'm not familiar with Thai and Indonesian civilization, but the Buddhist influence is evident in their temples (e.g., Borobodur).


message 18: by Rise (last edited Aug 28, 2014 07:40AM) (new)

Rise Telex Moon

The middle part of the trilogy is a departure from the first part's diverse form. In place of variable lengths of the lines, varied indentations, and varying stanza lengths is a strict sequence of quintains (stanzas of 5 lines) all throughout this second book. The multiple voices in the 1st part give way to the single voice of the national hero. From many perspectives and places to one quiet and intimate sojourn in Dapitan, right before Rizal's death in Luneta.

The internal rhymes and alliterations are sustained for long stretches, brilliant really. But rather than staid, straight lines, the rhythm is often broken by punctuations—e.g., by a series of em dashes, or long passages in "quotations"—and sometimes lines within poetic lines are signified by slashes ("/").

Rizal meditates on religion, on love, on armed revolution versus pacifism, on the "house of memory", on life in the city.

The image of the telex is elaborate and complex, but it is playfully introduced.

The sex of telex brings the grex an ax,
tells exactly the factly lack of lex
though in electric stockrooms it is rex;
its shocky hair that shakes the air mirific

connects the coin machines to the dreamers
in the stars, twenty-one ladders to Mars
with no crossroad in the main, and every brain
pulsing to the monetary tune....

I don't completely understand the image of the telex moon but I got a theory and am still thinking about it.

... Slowly—electric nervure—

once embossed in cornfields and banana groves—
chiselled in emblazonry—coaxes now
to bloom the telex moon! The rooty galax—
the rootless galaxy—the telstar legion

all flow magically to coax the telex
moon! And out of the escutcheon jumps
the telex moon! The fecund—the fictive—
the florid! Telex moon! Pollex moon! For

from afar it measures a finger long—
a finger song—from side to side/ It contains
the techniques—the tactics for clarity
and form—but none of the erotica

the City drags its bones by/ ...

I will explain my interpretation of the title later when I answer the questions. But for now it looks like Bautista luxuriates in wordplay and fancy word combinations here.


Tuklas Pahina (TP) | 1029 comments K.D. wrote: "Thank you, Rise and Po.

Rise, I agree that our pre-Hispanic civilization is smaller than those of India and China. But how was it compared to say Thailand and Indonesia?

Po, what if we became Mus..."


if we became Muslims instead of Christians, i think will be like arab Countries maybe rich in oil, desserted islands, i just hope there will be no wars like whats happening now in some arab states.

same as goes as how we respect their Koran and their management system in ruling their people.


Tuklas Pahina (TP) | 1029 comments K.D. wrote: "I just finished the second book, Telex Moon. I liked it so much especially when the subject is Leonor Rivera. You see, my interpretation is that the point-of-view is that of Jose Rizal's and this i..."

1.for me i think she love Leonor Rivera aside from being his first love , she was his inspiration aside from the hardships in courting her. Noli & Fili was dedicated to leonor Rivera as maria clara. Josephine on the other hand was just the second choice.

2.Rizal cameback to fulfil his duties like Senator. Benigno Aquino. Rizal love the Philippines so much and to cure her mother also. rizal loves Philippines thats why he came back.

3.I think he retracted because he was force to do it just for the sake of love with Josephine Bracken that was alleged of spying Rizals writings. Since the beginning Rizal was consistent in fighting his beliefs for freedom thats why he hate the spaniards.

4. I guess its not possible because its a feeling of living and dying. or maybe he already accepted his faith that he will die just like Jesus christ..

5. I think it was entitled Telex Moon because of Rizals death signifying the moon which is at night. Moon because it travels or journey of his struggles. Moon because it is cold in moon signyfying death


message 21: by K.D., Founder (new)

K.D. Absolutely (oldkd) | 6607 comments Mod
Rise wrote: "Telex Moon

The middle part of the trilogy is a departure from the first part's diverse form. In place of variable lengths of the lines, varied indentations, and varying stanza lengths is a strict ..."


Agree regarding Bautista's intent. He is like Beckett. They don't want to be understood right away or they don't want readers to be bored by being just "another" writer. Since they have the talent, why not flaunt it? And oh the talent is just overflowing with creativity and passion.


message 22: by K.D., Founder (new)

K.D. Absolutely (oldkd) | 6607 comments Mod
Po wrote: "K.D. wrote: "I just finished the second book, Telex Moon. I liked it so much especially when the subject is Leonor Rivera. You see, my interpretation is that the point-of-view is that of Jose Rizal..."

At sinagot mo talaga!
Wala lang akong maitanong hahaha.

Pero yong #5, yan valid yan. Kaso, nasaan ang telex?


message 23: by Rise (new)

Rise Answers to Book 2 Questions:

1) Who do you think Rizal loved more: Leonor Rivera or Josephine Bracken?

I don't know. And I don't think one should compare. I think Rizal loved each of them in his own way at the time that he loved them. He both dedicated works to them. His last poem, Mi último adiós, contains lines referring to Josephine.

2) If Rizal had the inkling that he would be killed by the Spaniards upon his return to the Philippines, why did he choose to come back?

Like Po said. Nandito ang laban.

3) What do you think: did Rizal retract his belief on Masonry and once again embrace Catholicism before he died?

I don't know. I think that considering everything, it doesn't matter whether he retracted or not. It's immaterial to our appreciation of his life and work. Only a fundamentalist or a fanatical religious would say that it changes everything or that it diminishes Rizal's legacy.

4) Is it possible for a human being to have a normal blood pressure when he knows that he is about to be executed? Why?

Everything is possible. Marami namang klase ng tao. May nerbyoso, may matapang, may walang pakialam, may takot sa injection, etc.

5) Why is this entitled "Telex Moon"?

Telex is the prototype of mobile phone. It can represent the modern city, its technology and its evils. It can represent modern progress through faster communication. I think it's an instrument that can bridge the past and present. Sort of like telepathy through time, or time travel. The past and present can coincide through memory. In this section, the story of Rizal still has relevance to the present and still communicates something to us.

I agree with Po about the moon signifying death. And death is constant in the same way that the moon is always out there, a satellite orbiting the earth.

Telex moon is the enduring witness to Rizal's despair while in exile in Dapitan and also the same witness to his death in Bagumbayan. Right now, above us is the telex moon, beaming a silent message through light: time is eternal, history is a cycle.


Tuklas Pahina (TP) | 1029 comments Salamat Rise at may kakampi ako sa mga sagot sa Tanong ni KD. Magaganda at informative ang mga sagot mo Rise talagang ni-research mo.


Tuklas Pahina (TP) | 1029 comments Ito ang tanong ko, bakit kaya sa tingin ninyo ay nagustuhan ni CFB na maging paksa sila Lapu-Lapu, Magellan, at Rizal? may kaugnayan ba ito sa kanyang personalidad o hilig? Ano sa palagay ninyo?


message 26: by K.D., Founder (new)

K.D. Absolutely (oldkd) | 6607 comments Mod
Po wrote: "Ito ang tanong ko, bakit kaya sa tingin ninyo ay nagustuhan ni CFB na maging paksa sila Lapu-Lapu, Magellan, at Rizal? may kaugnayan ba ito sa kanyang personalidad o hilig? Ano sa palagay ninyo?"

Dahil siguro walang gumagawa noon. Epic poetry in English? Sya lang ang alam kong may ganito. Marami rin ang mga famous na Filipino writers na tumatalakay kay Rizal pero hindi kina Magellan at Lapu-lapu.


Tuklas Pahina (TP) | 1029 comments at dahil jan KD, ikaw ang panalo Tama! siya lang ang nakagawa ng epic poetry na English bagamat kilala at sikat sa panahon niya noon ang mga Manunulat na Tagalog pero bukod tanging si CFB ang nakagawa niyan. Feeling ko ay Idol niya rin cguro si Rizal kaya pati pagtahak su mga gawad at parangal ni Rizal ay kanyang ginagawang halimbawa. Sana marami pang maging CFB ang maging gaya niya.


message 28: by BookNoy (Pinoy Reads Pinoy Books) (last edited Sep 03, 2014 07:36AM) (new)

BookNoy (Pinoy Reads Pinoy Books) | 84 comments Panalo!...Bigyan ng tshirt, jacket, celphone hehe!...at libro! hehe plus trophy! yehey!


message 29: by Rise (new)

Rise Po wrote: "Ito ang tanong ko, bakit kaya sa tingin ninyo ay nagustuhan ni CFB na maging paksa sila Lapu-Lapu, Magellan, at Rizal? may kaugnayan ba ito sa kanyang personalidad o hilig? Ano sa palagay ninyo?"

Sa palagay ko ay sadyang makabayan si CFB. At mahilig talaga siguro sya sa kasaysayan ng Pilipinas mula noong panahong Kastila.

Merong mas nauna nang konti kay CFB sa pagsulat ng epikong tula sa Ingles. Ang Barter in Panay (1961) ni Ricaredo Demetillo ay hango sa epikong Maragtas ng Panay tungkol sa sampung datu mula sa Borneo na nanirahan sa Panay noong ika-13 siglo. Sana ay mabasa din natin ito.


message 30: by K.D., Founder (new)

K.D. Absolutely (oldkd) | 6607 comments Mod
Rise, bilib na talaga ako sa iyo sa nalalaman mo sa Panitikang Filipino. Ikaw na!

Di ko pa tapos ang Book 3 kaya di pa ako makapagtanong. Pero tatapusin ko na ngayong araw na ito. Hintay lang kayo.


message 31: by K.D., Founder (new)

K.D. Absolutely (oldkd) | 6607 comments Mod
Questions for Book 3

1) What do you think is the meaning of the title? I guess that the sunlight means hope but what does "broken stones" represent?

2) Looking back, would you have voted for President Cory Aquino to become the president after President Marcos? Why?

3) The story (in the poem) covers the period in Philippine history from 1896 (Rizal's execution in Luneta) to 1986 (EDSA 1). What do you think is the reason why Cirilo Bautista did not cover up to 2000 (the year this book was published)? Why did he stop at EDSA 1?

4) As a Filipino, who do you think was the best Philippine president so far? Why?

5) Which of these three books is your favorite? Which one is the least?


message 32: by Rise (last edited Sep 09, 2014 07:57AM) (new)

Rise Before I answer the questions, some thoughts on Vol. 3.

With Sunlight on Broken Stones, it becomes obvious that CFB is concerned with the political trajectory of Philippine history. This final volume is an ethical poetic sequence describing the challenges faced by the country in instituting good governance. It describes the "broken" condition of the country in the aftermath of colonialism (Spain, America, Japan) and neocolonialism characterized by endemic corruption in government (at all levels!), endless hunger and poverty, oligarchy, and military abuses.

The epic has become a little closer to current events, spanning the period of Martial Law right up to People Power Revolution and the years under Cory. For the Marcos babies, the references to Marcos, Imelda, Cory, and Cardinal Sin are recognizable.

Marcos:

... Why then should I hide
anything when I have nothing to hide? Look
at the medals that fill my chests, and the bright
citations embracing my walls—are they not

the categorical imprimatur on
my legitimacy?

We also hear the first person monologues of Bonifacio and Rizal and, also from beyond the grave, the dead Marcos despairing over Cory's refusal to allow his corpse to return home from Hawaii.

There's Imelda vs Cory (+ Cardinal Sin); + their dead hubbies:

... "Revenge is mine," says one, and will not
permit homecoming for a corpse. "Must I mourn
till the close of doom?" says the other, and oils
the gearsprings that feed her money. How many
times must memory mock their bright peacock pride?

Tarmac-hero? Christ-like tyrant? Their husbands
are dead weights now though the cardinal with some
crazy name would canonize the first, condemn
the second, as if Virtue resided in
his fingertips.

An interesting passage is one attributed to Tolstoy, from a section which contains one epigraph after another. It perpetuates the cliche (especially among our national writers) about the "collective" imaginings of a race, contained in so-called "national literatures":

However important a political
literature may be, a literature
that reflects society's passing problems, and
however necessary to national

progress, there is however, still another
type of literature that reflects the true
eternal necessities of all mankind,
the dearest and deepest imaginings of
a whole race, one that is accessible to

all and to every age, one without which no
people has been able to grow powerful
and fertile.—L. Tolstoy, 1859.



message 33: by Rise (last edited Sep 09, 2014 08:20AM) (new)

Rise Mga sagot sa katanungan, Book 3:

1) What do you think is the meaning of the title? I guess that the sunlight means hope but what does "broken stones" represent?

Sa p. 37, may sinasabi tungkol sa "broken stones":

"And what language must rise out of broken stones
that serve as landscapes for a people's desire
to relight the fire of harmony and strength
?
Where are they now, the words Jaena splattered
at Barcelona and Madrid in splendid

"subversiveness? Where are the contracts for death,
or for life, that rich men and poor men inscribed
with the blood of their faith in reckless pursuit
of a common rule?"

Sa isang banda, "broken stones" ang bansang Pilipinas mismo dahil nga sa archipelagic at hiwa-hiwalay ang mga isla. Pagdating sa kalagayan ng bansa, basag-basag din dahil sa pananakop ng mga dayuhan at pagkatapos ay sa pamamahala ng mga kurakot sa pamahalaan.

2) Looking back, would you have voted for President Cory Aquino to become the president after President Marcos? Why?

Malamang. Antagal na kasi nakaupo ni Marcos, sagad na.

3) The story (in the poem) covers the period in Philippine history from 1896 (Rizal's execution in Luneta) to 1986 (EDSA 1). What do you think is the reason why Cirilo Bautista did not cover up to 2000 (the year this book was published)? Why did he stop at EDSA 1?

Mahirap kasi magsalita nang tapos kapag recent pa ang history. Marami pang developments at patuloy na sinusulat ang kasaysayan. Tingnan na lang natin si Enrile, bidang bida dati sa impeachment ni Justice Corona, ngayon nakakulong. Si Trillanes, dati mutineer, ngayong senador. Si Palparan dati berdugo, ngayon bilanggo. At noong 2000, wala rin namang masyadong balita sa panahon ni FVR, hindi sya makulay kagaya ni Cory, Ferdie, and Meldie. si Erap naman hindi pa nai-impeach noong panahon na iyon.

4) As a Filipino, who do you think was the best Philippine president so far? Why?

Ramon Magsaysay. Sa lahat ng president, sya ang may pinakamagandang imahe.

5) Which of these three books is your favorite? Which one is the least?

Gusto ko yung nauna, pero mas maganda talagang basahin ang tatlong parte na isang aklat lang.


message 34: by Tuklas Pahina (TP) (last edited Sep 09, 2014 07:56PM) (new)

Tuklas Pahina (TP) | 1029 comments Rise wrote: "Po wrote: "Ito ang tanong ko, bakit kaya sa tingin ninyo ay nagustuhan ni CFB na maging paksa sila Lapu-Lapu, Magellan, at Rizal? may kaugnayan ba ito sa kanyang personalidad o hilig? Ano sa palaga..."

wow! meron pang nauna sa kanya. Ang galing mo tlga Rise, salamat sa info. Yun panahon kc ni CFB ay panahon ng mga alyansa.


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