The Cool Kids' Fantasy Club discussion

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General discussion > Any recent books/series you’re sure you’ll re-read?

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message 1: by Steve (new)

Steve | 109 comments I’m never clear why some very good books can be enjoyed sufficiently just from the one reading but some you feel that you’ll just have to reread later, maybe some years later. Personally I rarely reread as I feel I’ve got so much more new stuff queued up. But some I just can’t resist because of the particular pleasure I got from reading the first time.
When I was a child I reread the CS Lewis Narnia series several times, and later Tolkien’s LoRs. Maybe not a lot of competition then. In more recent times I reread GRRMs GoT just as the TV series started, and also Philip Pullman’s Dark Materials. Also (non Fanatsy) some Christopher Hitchens books because I just love his prose.
Now I know I’ll reread Mark Lawrence’s Broken Empire series soon because I think Ive just got to reappreciate the depth of Jorg’s character and the world created for the series. Also I think I’ll reread Josiah Bancroft’s Senlin books eventually, if the last volume is as good as the others, just for the tingly pleasure I got from reading them the first time!
Anything you’ve read in recent years that you know you’ll reread?


message 2: by Ellie (new)

Ellie Billings | 24 comments Yes I know what you mean.
I'm always rereading Discworld books because there's always so much more to be found and they're entertaining every time around.
I also reread His Dark Materials series, that has a very special place in my heart.
I haven't for a while, but I always used to reread Harry Potter.
I'm actually reading the Narnia series for the first time, and I don't think I'll be rereading, I think they must be one of those series that you have to read as a child first to capture your heart to be able to appreciate more as an adult. That said, the writing is nice.


message 3: by Lope (new)

Lope Nieves (lupus7) | 7 comments dresden file


message 4: by Patricia (new)

Patricia Burroughs (pooks) I'm far more likely to relisten these days. Ben Aaronovitch's Peter Grant series fall into that category because Kobna Holdbrook-Smith's narration is so splendid. I need to relisten to Neil Gaiman's Anansi Boys, which is one of the best I've ever heard because of Lenny Henry's narration.

I read Gone With the Wind at 14 and was overwhelmed with feels. Read it again at 27 because I needed escape, and again, the feels. Attempted to read it once more a decade or so later and was overwhelmed with feels--of discomfort, of guilt, of wtf was I thinking? I still think it is a masterwork of some things, most particularly the characterization of an absolute bitch done in such a way that most readers still wanted her to have a happy ending--which is almost unique for female characters in my experience. But reading Mammy's dialect and having had it pointed out to me that the KKK are the 'good guys' late in the book [how did I ever miss that?] meant I doubt I'll ever read that book again. No pleasure there. Just a general sense of ick.

My reread of Podkayne of Mars as an adult was fabulous. It was even better than I remembered it being. My reread of A Wrinkle in Time was not so successful though to be honest my favorite L'Engle was Arm of the Starfish, which I probably should give another shot.


message 5: by Kayleigh (new)

Kayleigh Nicol | 3 comments I love rereading book series! My comfort go-to books will always be the the Tortall books by Tamora Pierce, but I've also reread the Harry Potter books and the ASOIAF books a few times. I reread Brandon Sanderson's Stormlight Archives a few months before the next book is due to come out.

Most recently, I would say I'm looking forward to rereading the Red Rising trilogy. I only just finished it, but I feel like I could read those first three books over and over and over and never get sick of them!


message 6: by Steve (last edited Jun 23, 2018 01:53PM) (new)

Steve | 109 comments Ellie wrote: "Yes I know what you mean.
I'm always rereading Discworld books because there's always so much more to be found and they're entertaining every time around.
I also reread His Dark Materials series, t..."


The Narnia books were very much a children’s read for me, definitely not an adult book but it made an impact on a 9yr old! But if youve not read them probably worth seeing what the fuss is about them. I think they have aged quite a bit from the time they’ve been written too.

I think I’ll always be dipping into Discworld books. They are always such positive, witty books. Well, mostly.


message 7: by Steve (new)

Steve | 109 comments Patricia wrote: "I'm far more likely to relisten these days. Ben Aaronovitch's Peter Grant series fall into that category because Kobna Holdbrook-Smith's narration is so splendid. I need to relisten to Neil Gaiman'..."

To show my age I haven’t yet got back into audiobooks! When I was younger and drove a lot on my job I’d take audiobooks out of public libraries to play in the car. But they were tapes! And normally abridged versions of the book because of capacity issues. In the modern era with digital storage techniques apparently it’s easily possible to get the full audio experience. Something I’ll have to explore.
Do people on here prefer it to old fashioned reading?! Does it depend on the narrator, as I suspect?


message 8: by Jeremy (new)

Jeremy Jackson | 24 comments That's a tougher question than it should be. I have to be absolutely blown away by a book these days to reread it: not because there's too little merit in the genre, but because there's too much. So many already-published titles deserve to be reread, yet new books are being published by new authors all the time, and a lot of them are really good too. The bar is set too high, and I run out of time!

That said, I plan on rereading Bancroft's Books of Babel. I adore the story, and I won't ever tire of his prose. They scream "classic", and they're among my favorites of any genre. If I put my counselor on speed dial, I'll reread Robin Hobb's Farseer books. Fitz and the Fool are two of my most beloved fantasy characters, but it's definitely an emotional investment. I can see revisiting K.J. Parker and Gene Wolfe (you kind of *have* to reread Gene Wolfe). In the past, I've enjoyed coming back to Tolkien, Gaiman, and Lewis.


message 9: by Zack (new)

Zack (ztyp) | 5 comments I am not much of a re-reader (or re-watcher or re-player for that matter). It takes a very special book series to get me to even consider a re-read, but then I often only read the first couple chapters before starting something new instead. There are just so many things to read out there and not enough time to repeat the experience!


message 10: by Jacqueline (new)

Jacqueline | 128 comments The narrator can make a huge difference to listening to an audiobook. I downloaded Magnus Chase onto my phone from my library app and the narrators voice was soooo boring. I turned it off and returned it straight away. I love Ricks books but this voice was just wrong for me. I loved Lenny Henry reading me the Anansi Boys and Will Weaton reading me Armada. Most people love Stephen Fry, Tim Curry and Jim Dale.

I love rereading old series favourites but this year I’m doing a couple of different challenges on here and they’re forcing me to read new stuff. Which is good but I am missing my HP reread.


message 11: by Patricia (new)

Patricia Burroughs (pooks) Steve wrote: "Do people on here prefer it to old fashioned reading?! Does it depend on the narrator, as I suspect?"

I don't think it has to be either/or. I like doing both. But audiobooks give me the ability to 'read' when I can;t actually sit down to do it. I listen to them when I'm doing work around the house or in the yard, at night when I'm going to sleep [which often means relistening to what I missed if I fell asleep, but that does't bother me]. And yes, when I'm driving.

You can get audiobooks from the library without actually having to go there, too.


message 12: by Gavman (new)

Gavman | 1 comments I find it better to read the book then listen to audio version, it makes it easier to sit thru set ups or slow parts and if the voice axtor is good adds a depth you might not of considered. Conn Igguldens war of the roses is a good example, the books had some long set ups and time skips which in audio are easier to consume


message 13: by Arista (new)

Arista | 1 comments I don’t think I’ve ever re read a book for pleasure. Maybe for a school assignment but there’s so many good books out there, how can anyone have the time to read the same book again?


message 14: by Steve (last edited Jun 24, 2018 11:29AM) (new)

Steve | 109 comments Arista wrote: "I don’t think I’ve ever re read a book for pleasure. Maybe for a school assignment but there’s so many good books out there, how can anyone have the time to read the same book again?"
In general I agree. There’s so much good stuff, well reviewed anyway, to read it’s tough to find the time. But I have found some that is so well written , or that I suspect has a depth I might not have fully appreciated, that there’s a few I have reread. And enjoyed again. Maybe it’s my age, but I forgot so many details in GoT by GRRM that the second reading some years after the first was almost as enjoyable. Even knowing some critical plot lines.
My suspicion is that the Broken Empire series will be the same for me in 2-3 years.


message 15: by Beverly (new)

Beverly (bevarc) | 35 comments My favorite re-read books are Michael J Sullivan's Riyria Revelations and Riyria Chronicles because I love the characters Hadrian Blackwater & Royce Melborn. Next is Jim Butcher's The Dresden Files. The characters and knowing that there are little crumbs in each book leading to the next one and to the ultimate ending keeps me intrigued and trying to find crumbs I may have missed in previous readings. Jorg Ancrath keeps me coming back at least once a year because he is a fascinating character.


message 16: by Robert (new)

Robert (kalthandrix) Awaken Online series. Highly addicting.


message 17: by Abdul (new)

Abdul Malik | 37 comments Not now or anytime soon but someday I shall definitely pick up the Wheel of Time again and go on that jounrey from start to finish once more. And it shall be glorious!!


message 18: by Addi (new)

Addi (addisu) | 73 comments Book: Henry James, Turn of the Screw
Series: all the Agatha Christie books, especially Poirot. Although, back when I first read them all I was thirteen or fourteen, and on re-reads, some of the politics in there is slightly cringeworthy, especially the ones that are set in the Arab world.


message 19: by Corlag (new)

Corlag TheBard | 3 comments Red Rising series is a yearly re-read or more at this point.


message 20: by Pamela (new)

Pamela  | 54 comments Beverly wrote: "My favorite re-read books are Michael J Sullivan's Riyria Revelations and Riyria Chronicles because I love the characters Hadrian Blackwater & Royce Melborn. Next is Jim Butcher's The Dresden Files..."

I read the Revelations first, then the Chronicles. Would like to switch the order sometime and re-read, as Hadrian and Royce are two of my favorite characters. Jorg is another one I'd also like to revisit. Finding the time is my problem, cause of all the other books on my list that I haven't read yet. I've also enjoyed all the Dresden books. Have listened to all these series on audio, they all have great narration.


message 21: by Steve (new)

Steve | 109 comments I think the common theme in this thread is clear! We’ve all read books, including in the modern fantasy gender, that have an such an impact on us that we’d like to reread them. But it’s finding the time to do so, especially with the steady stream of new, well rated, books in our ‘intrays’!
It raises the question why many of us have shelves creaking with books we’ve read? Why keep them after they’ve been read and we won’t reread them? I know that’s slightly off topic! I’ve had a recent clear out but the book levels in my house are still close to being a H&S hazard. And my reading comprises 80% ebooks nowadays which helps for the future.


message 22: by Pamela (new)

Pamela  | 54 comments Yes, I have creaking shelves too, when I actually enjoy the ebooks or audio better. I have cleared out some series, but others, I just can't part with. I guess, it's like displaying a favorite picture, the books are saying 'this is what I enjoy and it's special to me'.


message 23: by Patricia (new)

Patricia Burroughs (pooks) Pamela wrote: "Yes, I have creaking shelves too, when I actually enjoy the ebooks or audio better. I have cleared out some series, but others, I just can't part with. I guess, it's like displaying a favorite pict..."

This might deserve a separate topic!

I had books triple-stacked on all shelves in many bookcases plus boxes of books on the floor in my office. Many, many were books I bought because they looked interesting [couldn't walk into a book store without picking up two or three].

I got my first Kindle. It took me awhile to really get into it but I suddenly realized I was reading more. It was easier to take a book--or several books--with me. I could adjust the font size.

I looked at all those boxes of books I was hoarding for the day when I would be happy to have them because we all know 'that day' is coming somehow, don't we? And I realized there was a time when "This looks interesting," was all it took to get me to read it, but that time ended a long time ago. "This looks interesting enough to buy and read later" instead of, "OMG i just read the first few pages and have to keep reading" means it's going to end up in a box. I got rid of them all. ALL OF THEM. Even the books I'd read.

I still have three bookcases but they are only for the Pooks Library, the books I want to possess and caress for any reason.

Because yeah, we don't have the time to reread we once wanted to and in my case I decided I'd rather have to buy a book again [hopefully for my Kindle] or ind it in a library on that 'what if' day that I actually want to reread it than have it lost in one of a dozen boxes where I can't find it anyway!


message 24: by [deleted user] (new)

I could read McCarthy's the Road over and over and over and over. And over. And over and over and over. You get the jist.

I'm currently reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen by Steven Erikson, and I KNOW I'll be re-reading this series to absorb everything.


message 25: by Pamela (new)

Pamela  | 54 comments Tim wrote: "I could read McCarthy's the Road over and over and over and over. And over. And over and over and over. You get the jist.

I'm currently reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen by Steven Erikson, a..."


The Road is definitely one of those books that stays in your mind for a long time. Such a vivid depiction of a ruined world, it was quite depressing.


message 26: by [deleted user] (new)

Pamela wrote: "Tim wrote: "I could read McCarthy's the Road over and over and over and over. And over. And over and over and over. You get the jist.

I'm currently reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen by Steve..."


But there's plenty of hope there too :) “Keep a little fire burning; however small, however hidden.”


message 27: by Robin (new)

Robin Hobb | 21 comments I seldom re-read a book from start to finish any more. But yes, I have shelves of books in my offices. They're my friends. Some, such as LOTR, I can open at random and read for a bit with pleasure. True for my poetry anthologies as well, and for my poetry collections.
Why do I keep the books I may never re-read? Because I have grandchildren. It's very satisfying to take a book off the shelf and hand it to someone at exactly the right moment in life for them to love it. Often those books don't return to my shelves, but that's how it's supposed to be. That's why I have my Dad's copy of Treasure Island.
Some books are ways to visit friends who are gone now. The Jaguar Hunter for Lucius Shephard, for example.


message 28: by Emma (new)

Emma Organdie (organdie) I love to reread, I don't really care that there are so many new books out there that I could be reading instead. Sometimes a reread of an old favourite is the only thing that will do.

I reread Harry Potter, The Hobbit and LOTR regularly, some Terry Pratchett and non fantasy stuff.

I'm reading The Song of Ice and Fire books at the moment and I know I'll reread those at some point because there is so much detail. Same goes for The Realm of the Elderlings books.


message 29: by Juniper (new)

Juniper Nichols (moonjunio) | 2 comments There are a few circumstances where I make time to re-read:

- There’s a new book in a favorite series, and it’s a way to tide me over while impatient to live with those characters again. It has to really be a major fave, or a long time between releases. Examples: Fitz and the Fool’s last trilogy (Assassin’s Fate), ElfQuest: Final Quest, Carry On by Rainbow Rowell.

- Indoctrinate the children: We just finished The Hobbit, mainly so they can appreciate it when we visit Hobbitton in NZ, and because they love dragons, and I love elves. I would love to read them Wise Child by Monica Furlong, or Ronia the Robber’s Daughter, but these are not available as ebooks. I have to wait until I can get my childhood copies out of storage. (Yay creaking bookshelves)

- I’m super sick and need a comfort read that doesn’t require any brain power, and is sure to have a pleasant effect.

- I’m writing something with a similar vibe and want to figure out what makes it so good.


message 30: by Otto (new)

Otto | 3 comments Probably The Book of the New Sun because that is the whole point of that series.


message 31: by Mark (new)

Mark Lawrence (marklawrence) | 369 comments Mod
It's hard to justify re-reading with such a flow of new good books, but re-reading can be great. I want to read Lord of the Rings again. And maybe the A Song of Ice and Fire series when Winds of Winter arrives.


message 32: by Dave (new)

Dave Roberts (blackbooks78) | 5 comments I justify re-reading by listening to the audio version while out running. Currently re-reading the Riyria revelations.


message 33: by Melissa (new)

Melissa Jane I love the Riyria series and have read them again earlier this year. I also plan on rereading Greg Curtis' Finius and Tusk, Timothy Ellis' entire Hunter Legacy series, Loren K Jones series Stavin Dragonblessed and I just finished rereading Lorna Freeman's Borderlands series. If you haven't already read these, don't miss out, they are worth it!


message 34: by Emma (new)

Emma (keeperofthearchives) I reread a lot. Some books I read yearly, whole series have to wait longer, especially if i had to read the early books multiple times as the series built. I'm pretty convinced I know some characters better than friends and possibly even family.

What do people do when a new instalment in a long series is released? I always used to read them all again from the beginning so I knew what was going on. I can't even say how many times I've read The Eye of the World or Gardens of the Moon.

Really interested in the way people on here are using audiobooks. I usually choose non fiction for audio as the narrator is everything for me. Not sure I could listen to something i'd read for myself as my ideas about sound/accent/pronunciation would be too fixed to hear someone else's version. But i'd love to get some good recommendations for great narrators I should look up....


message 35: by Patricia (new)

Patricia Burroughs (pooks) The narrator is everything for me, too. For example, all the Temeraire books had a wonderful narrator. He got the voices, personalities, and emotions spot on. Novik's two recent fairy tale-ish books also have good narrators--narrators who have an Eastern European or Russian vibe which fits the locations of the books. I hate to say 'accent' because I have no clue whether the accents are authtentic or not, but at least the narrators aren't reading in American accents.

I sample every book before I buy it [from Audible] and usually do before getting one from the library but sometimes don't since it's not costing me anything if I don't read it.

And three times since I joined at the two-books-a-month level in 2003 I have returned books to Audible because once I started listening, I realized the narrator was so problematical I just wasn't going to be able to listen. They refunded me my credits without batting an eyelash.

So--listen to the samples. Do you want to keep listening? There you go.

As for great narrators--which books? Jayne Entwhistle was one of my favorites ever. She did the Flavia de Luce mysteries and also the Her Royal Spyness mysteries, amongst many others.


message 36: by Emma (new)

Emma (keeperofthearchives) Patricia wrote: "The narrator is everything for me, too. For example, all the Temeraire books had a wonderful narrator. He got the voices, personalities, and emotions spot on. Novik's two recent fairy tale-ish book..."

I definitely make use of the audible clips, but there have been a few times I had to return audiobooks once I’d listened longer. It’s fantastic that we’re allowed to do so, I think.

I haven’t read any of the series you mention so I’ll look them up. Thank you for your suggestions!


message 37: by Pamela (new)

Pamela  | 54 comments Emma wrote: "I reread a lot. Some books I read yearly, whole series have to wait longer, especially if i had to read the early books multiple times as the series built. I'm pretty convinced I know some characte..."

Michael J Sullivan's Riyria books have great narration from Tim Gerard Reynolds. I prefer to listen to these books, just because he captures the characters perfectly. If you're interested in trying a fiction, this would be a good start. I mention this one, cause so many previous people have said this series is re-read worthy, which I agree.


message 38: by Emma (new)

Emma (keeperofthearchives) Pamela wrote: "Emma wrote: "I reread a lot. Some books I read yearly, whole series have to wait longer, especially if i had to read the early books multiple times as the series built. I'm pretty convinced I know ..."

Excellent. I have read some of the stories but it was a long time ago and I don't have the characters too set in my mind. Thank you!


message 39: by Mark (new)

Mark Lawrence (marklawrence) | 369 comments Mod
Pamela wrote: "Michael J Sullivan's Riyria books have great narration from Tim Gerard Reynolds...."

Tim narrated my Red Queen's War trilogy for the US market. He really seemed to enjoy himself. He has quite a following in his own right.


message 40: by Pamela (new)

Pamela  | 54 comments Mark wrote: "Pamela wrote: "Michael J Sullivan's Riyria books have great narration from Tim Gerard Reynolds...."

Tim narrated my Red Queen's War trilogy for the US market. He really seemed to enjoy himself. He..."


Yes, I listened to Prince of Fools, he really captures the humor of Jalen's character. Have the other two downloaded and will listen to them as well. James Clamp really nailed your Broken Empire series; after listening to Prince of Thorns, I knew I had to listen to the next two, opposed to reading them. Loved that series! (That would be another re-listen for me, if I ever get caught up with my TBR list)


message 41: by James (new)

James (jw89) | 17 comments I wish I could re-read, but there is always something else I want to read for the first time. Every time I think of re-reading I wonder about what opportunities I am missing in new worlds with new authors. If I ever get into a slump, there are some I might consider to get the juices flowing, but re-reading for me is more of a missed opportunity for new reading.


message 42: by Nick (new)

Nick George | 5 comments I have a ton to catch up on and yet I'm re-reading Graveyard of Memories by Barry Eisler. Not fantasy but his prose and characters are so strong and realistic, I always come back to him. Also re-listening to Words of Radiance by Brandon Sanderson right now so I can move on to Oathbringer. Just too much awesome stuff out there these days.


message 43: by E.Y.E.-D (new)

E.Y.E.-D (eye-d) | 21 comments I definitely make time to reread some favorites. I have read Harry Potter a couple times, His Dark Materials at least four. I have a lot of books I have read in the last few years that are due for a reread soonish.


message 44: by Khartun (new)

Khartun | 5 comments I haven't reread much in my life except LOTR. There are just too many things to read. My TBR is huge.

However, I will definitely reread Malazan. I know there is a ton of information there that I missed in the first read.


message 45: by Pamela (new)

Pamela  | 54 comments Rereading Gardens of the Moon now. Loved listening to it, but felt I needed to take the time with reading, so I could stop and refer to the glossary now and then. So much information to absorb.


message 46: by Robert (new)

Robert (kalthandrix) The whole Awaken Online series so far by Travis Bagwell. Simply an amazing set of books!


message 47: by Katie (new)

Katie J (katie1313) | 5 comments Well, I am pretty sure I will be re-reading The Black Company to welcome the newest addition to the fam ;) I know a lot of people are ‘meh’ over this novel, but I tend to re-read 100 Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez every couple of years, as well as The Feast of All Saints by Anne Rice.


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