Reading 1001 discussion

The Wonderful O
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Past BOTM discussions > June 2018 BOTM: The Wonderful O

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message 1: by Jen (last edited May 29, 2018 05:15PM) (new)

Jen | 1608 comments Mod
June discussion questions to be posted on June 1. Check back then.

Extra challenge to readers this month: Post your responses and reviews without using the letter "O". Can you manage it?


Kelly_Hunsaker_reads ... | 894 comments Jen wrote: "June discussion questions to be posted on June 1. Check back then.

Extra challenge to readers this month: Post your responses and reviews without using the letter "O". Can you manage it?"


Ummm... Can I use "eau"? This is a challenge that I will struggle with, I am sure. LOL


message 3: by Jen (new)

Jen | 1608 comments Mod
Kelly wrote: "Jen wrote: "June discussion questions to be posted on June 1. Check back then.

Extra challenge to readers this month: Post your responses and reviews without using the letter "O". Can you manage i..."


ha ha - nope


message 4: by Jen (last edited Jun 03, 2018 07:08AM) (new)

Jen | 1608 comments Mod
Some discussion questions:

1. What do you think of the illustrations? If you are able to, post a photo of your favorite image/illustration.

2. What do you think of the style? Have you read it aloud? Any favorite quotes or wordplays?

3. This is one of the few children's books that actually made the list. Why do you think this book makes the list?

4. Although this is a children's book, did you enjoy it? Why do you think this book appeals to both children and adults alike?

5. What is the message of the book?

6. Write a review without using any "o"s.


message 5: by Book (last edited Jun 08, 2018 11:04AM) (new)

Book Wormy | 2078 comments Mod
1) I can't wrk ut hw t pst pictures LL

2) I lve the wrd play I think it is very erudite and great fr expanding vcabulary. I like that sme f it has the feel of a nursery rhythm or pem. I really enjyed all the wrd play dn't have a fav.

3) I think it made the list because it is so clever in terms f style and wrd play. It is a great vcabulary builder and intrduces several histrical characters that can then be researched it's a great building blck.

4) I lved it I think it appeals t everyne because it is such fun.

5) I think the message is that language is imprtant and that it can be used subversively wrds are powerful. It's als abut greed and nt getting what yu want.

6) What a delightful and fun bk. I lve the play n wrds and the petry.


message 6: by Jen (last edited Jun 04, 2018 02:53AM) (new) - rated it 3 stars

Jen | 111 comments 1. I absolutely loved the illustrations, which added a great deal to the reading experience. (I returned my inter-library loan copy already and so can't look back to flag any favourites!)

2. Similar to above, I don't have a copy at hand to pull up examples, but I did chuckle over poor stuttering Otto Ott. This book was full of memorable passages. I read pieces aloud to my kids who were instantly drawn in, I'm going to get them a copy.

3. It's a great children's book, but overall I have no idea why two Thurber books are preferred over many other greats. My sense is whoever first curated the list had a love of Thurber and it's stuck. Much like the other multi-book listed authors ... I'm looking at you, Henry James!

4. Kids and adults love wordplay and a text that requires a bit of 'work'. The themes here also appeal greatly to adults.

5. There are several themes here but the one that reads to me as most timely is its warning against tyranny.

6. haha, maybe later.


Diane Zwang | 1315 comments Mod
I read this book last summer so I will pass on the questions. Here is my review O's and all.

I did not grow up reading Thurber and I did not read Thurber to my son. Last summer I did a buddy read with my son reading The Thirteen Clocks which was not a hit with him.

“Confusion reigns on the island of Ooroo when the letter O is banished.”

My copy of this book came with an introduction by Ransom Riggs. I found it insightful regarding the story and author. Thurber's writing reminds me of Dr. Seuss; clever use of language and vocabulary with political or social undertones. I think this story is still relevant today regarding the ramifications of losing ones freedom and laws that enforce ignorance.


message 8: by Jen (last edited Jun 04, 2018 05:34PM) (new)

Jen | 1608 comments Mod
Book wrote: "1) I can't wrk ut hw t pst pictures LL

2) I lve the wrd play I think it is very erudite and great fr expanding vcabulary. I like that sme f it has the feel of a nursery rhythm or pem. I really enj..."


I spy a few unacceptable letters in the responses thee has given :) but I will hand it to U since u are the first to attempt it.


Tracy (tstan) | 559 comments Jen wrote: "Book wrote: "1) I can't wrk ut hw t pst pictures LL

2) I lve the wrd play I think it is very erudite and great fr expanding vcabulary. I like that sme f it has the feel of a nursery rhythm or pem...."


This discussing is making me laugh very hard!


message 10: by Pip (new) - rated it 4 stars

Pip | 1481 comments 1. I listened: an Audible thing, pictureless.
2. The style is brilliant. The reading was flawless. Alas, minus special bits saved.
3. A classic: funny, witty, punful.
4. Wish I had read it when my children were small.
5. Tyranny is bad, liberty better.

This title deserves reading with speech, preferably with small children listening. Cherishable.


message 11: by Jen (new)

Jen | 1608 comments Mod
Pip wrote: "1. I listened: an Audible thing, pictureless.
2. The style is brilliant. The reading was flawless. Alas, minus special bits saved.
3. A classic: funny, witty, punful.
4. Wish I had read it when my ..."


Fantastic!

I read it with my daughter listening. It was brilliant.


Kelly_Hunsaker_reads ... | 894 comments W-W! I had never heard -f Thurber bef-re this, and wish that I had kn-wn of him when my kids were still kids. The way he writes is delightful. I l-ved especially the few pages when they were taking all the music instruments. The w-rdplay was l-ovely!

1. What do you think of the illustrations? If you are able to, post a photo of your favorite image/illustration.

My fave is on pages 12 and 13. It shows an -rchestra with-ut all the musicians wh- played instruments that c-ntain the letter "-". :)

2. What do you think of the style? Have you read it aloud? Any favorite quotes or wordplays?

I f-und myself reading parts several times just to enj-y the style. S-, yes, I l-ved it.

3. This is one of the few children's books that actually made the list. Why do you think this book makes the list?

I d-n't know... alth-ugh I l-ved it I do think that there are -ther children's b--ks that deserve a place on the list m-re than this -ne d-es.

4. Although this is a children's book, did you enjoy it? Why do you think this book appeals to both children and adults alike?

The wit. It is brilliant

5. What is the message of the book?

I agree with every-ne else. The main theme is tyrrany.

6. Write a review without using any "o"s.

I will do that later t-night.


Kristel (kristelh) | 4259 comments Mod
I've read this twice and may get it read a third time.

Here's my reviews; I will remove the Os.
I enjyed this children's book. I like how James Thurber plays with wrds. I think ther authors have brrwed frm his technique.

Qutes:
pg 38, "..what was the letter of the law is now the law of the letter."

Reread it for #1001 summer radtrip, a tur through hi. Reading it this time, I kept having thughts f hw we are drpping letters a chatting via apps and scial media. Is the alphabet changing?

Thurber is a man wh lved words. I did not know that he went blind. He hired Marc Simont to illustrate his. I wn this bk with the illustrations by Marc Simont, wh wn the Caldecott Medal.

The back cver tells us that 2 men visit the island of ooroo on the bat Aeiu in search of jewels. These men start taking away the freedms of the inhabitants of Ooroo 1 thing at a time until there is nthing left but cnfusin and chas. The islanders decide that there are 4 words with O that must not be lost, do you know what the 4 words are?

rating 3.86

I left Os where I felt they shuld nt be mitted.


message 14: by Diane (last edited Jun 11, 2018 05:58AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Diane  | 2051 comments Here is my review, sans that pesky letter featured in the title. I may abuse a few grammatical rules in attempting this feat:


I have read this playful children's fantasy tale twice, and highly liked it each time I read it. I find it delightful. I cherish any writings that use letter play (and the larger things the letters make). I have always been a letter liker that detests numbers. Thus, few can beat me at letter games. Naturally, then, I relished this. I read it the first time many years in the past and read it with my children. They seemed very receptive, especially my daughter. I have always been keen with the writings by James Thurber, and I ready many tales penned by him as a child. I acted in a play written by him as a teenager (the award-winning "A Thurber Carnival"). Great fun. I listened via Audible this time and can't speak regarding the pictures, but I remember that they were nice and vibrant the first time I read it.

Hey, being truthful, I basically dislike writing reviews and keep them brief and succinct. Reviews are a bit like pulling teeth, by my standards. They, like, pain me a little. Barring a letter is actually a bit fun, thus I am still writing. I am surprised that few members attempted it. I say, try it, it is easier than imaginable.

My take? This tale is just plain fun! This review makes me appear a bit inarticulate and extremely weird, but I am just adhering with the rules creatively established by Jen. I am running empty with gibberish, I will subsequently call this review quits. I may add a line later.


Kristel (kristelh) | 4259 comments Mod
Diane wrote: "Here is my review, sans that pesky letter featured in the title. I may abuse a few grammatical rules in attempting this feat:


I have read this playful children's fantasy tale twice, and highly l..."

Nice job!


message 16: by Diane (last edited Jun 10, 2018 07:18PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Diane  | 2051 comments 1. What do you think of the illustrations? If you are able to, post a photo of your favorite image/illustration.

I listened via Audible this time and can't speak regarding the pictures, but I remember that they were nice and vibrant the first time I read it.

2. What do you think of the style? Have you read it aloud? Any favorite quotes or wordplays?

Really like the whimsical style. Have read it verbally in the past (with my kids).

3. This is one of the few children's books that actually made the list. Why do you think this book makes the list?

It's creativity. It is reminiscent the techniques used by Perec, in certain ways. That writing style I can't say, because it has that banned letter in it. I think the fact that it used a restricting technique is highly inventive and clever.

4. Although this is a children's book, did you enjoy it? Why do you think this book appeals to both children and adults alike?

I liked it quite a bit. I think it has appeal because it stimulates thinking and creativity with language usage.

5. What is the message of the book?

The deficiency experienced when having liberties and things we cherish taken away. It indicates that all letters in the alphabet are vital in language, as well.

6. Write a review without using any "o"s.

See the entry in #14


Diane  | 2051 comments The Perec technique I alluded to above is Oulipo. It's kind of like Oulipo for children.


message 18: by Jen (new)

Jen | 1608 comments Mod
Diane wrote: "Here is my review, sans that pesky letter featured in the title. I may abuse a few grammatical rules in attempting this feat:


I have read this playful children's fantasy tale twice, and highly l..."


Great review!


message 19: by Paula (new)

Paula S (paula_s) | 220 comments 1. What do you think of the illustrations? If you are able to, post a photo of your favorite image/illustration.
I read the tale last week and I already can't remember the pictures. I guess they were nice?

2. What do you think of the style? Have you read it aloud? Any favorite quotes or wordplays?
It was very imaginative, and interesting, stylistically. I really liked the lists of banned items, and how they sometimes rhymed and sometimes not.

3. This is one of the few children's books that actually made the list. Why do you think this book makes the list?
Different and creative, but there are a number of other book they could have chosen.

4. Although this is a children's book, did you enjoy it? Why do you think this book appeals to both children and adults alike?
Yes, I liked it. The wordplay made it interstesting.

5. What is the message of the book?
That there are some words not worth giving up, and if you just wait the bad guys will bite off too much and get caught in their own trap and their reign of terror will implode.

6. Write a review without using any "o"s.
4 stars. I really liked it. A fun imaginative children's tale.


message 20: by Gail (new)

Gail (gailifer) | 1536 comments I finished this delightful children's tale.

1. What do you think of the illustrations? If you are able to, post a photo of your favorite image/illustration.

I think the best single drawing is with the few remaining instruments and instrumentalists after the pirate's dictate, but I find the animals leaving seaward charming. And, the picture _f the magic b__k in the library.

2. What do you think of the style? Have you read it aloud? Any favorite quotes or wordplays?

It is all fun. It must be read audibly, I believe, to get the rhythms and beats.

3. This is one of the few children's books that actually made the list. Why do you think this book makes the list?
I believe it makes the list because it is ab_ut language, cens_rship and extreme dictates which are adult themes.

4. Although this is a children's book, did you enjoy it? Why do you think this book appeals to both children and adults alike?

Yes, it is very much a fairy tale and an adventure tale with themes that appeal t_ children and adults.

5. What is the message of the book?

It is ab_ut tyranny and taking issues t_ extremes with_ut c_nsidering the ramificati_ns.
It is als_ ab_ut w_rdplay and cens_rship _n that w_rdplay.

And that freedom is not just a word but it is worth writing correctly!






reply | flag *


message 21: by Jen (new)

Jen | 1608 comments Mod
Please add any additional questions for the group.

A few of you have mentioned censorship. What is Thurber saying about censorship?

Is this a book for children or adults? or both?


message 22: by George P. (new)

George P. | 541 comments I haven't read The Wonderful O, but I've just read Thurber's The 13 Clocks, his other 1001 list book. I've also rather long ago read some of Thurber's stories for adults; I still have an ex-library copy of The Thurber Carnival, a compilation from a number of his books, and I'm inspired to do some reading in that soon.
I enjoyed The 13 Clocks, which is also a "children's" story, although a lot of the wordplay is geared to amuse adults, and it's really a satire of a fairy tale, though it does have a happy ending for the good guy. Thurber said in his preface that he wrote it when he was supposed to be working on another book, and that he had so much fun polishing it, his publisher had to pressure him to stop, publish it, and move on to other work.


Chinook | 282 comments 1. I enjoyed the illustrations. I read the first half or so to Kait and the illustrations kept her going! She’s a bit young for the length of this.

2. I liked the cadence of reading the lists in particular. I read half aloud and half to myself.

3. As silly as it is, the book has a serious message.

4. I love children’s books in general, so that wasn’t an obstacle for me at all. I did like it quite a lot.

5. Everyone else has pretty much covered all my thoughts on the message.

6. That was a laugh! And yet I learned well its message.


message 24: by Jen (new)

Jen | 1608 comments Mod
George wrote: "I haven't read The Wonderful O, but I've just read Thurber's The 13 Clocks, his other 1001 list book. I've also rather long ago read some of Thurber's stories for adults; I still have..."

I enjoyed The 13 Clocks too.


message 25: by Book (new)

Book Wormy | 2078 comments Mod
Diane wrote: "Here is my review, sans that pesky letter featured in the title. I may abuse a few grammatical rules in attempting this feat:


Love it Diane that was really well played!!



Melissa Answer and review, minus the disreputable letter:

I was delighted with the cadence and linguistic play in this children’s tale. I’m unsure why it was selected for the 1001 literature list because it was reminiscent with Dr. Seuss’s writing style. Yet it did address the issues with banning letters in a way that might help children understand the perils present when making things illegal just because they disturb an individual.


message 27: by Jen (new)

Jen | 1608 comments Mod
Nicely done but I spy one “O”


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