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message 1: by Richard (new)

Richard Boyett | 10 comments I am fast coming to the end of Patrick O’Brian’s Jack Aubrey series and I can’t imagine a life without sailing with Steven and Jack. Please any suggestions about further adventures are needed. I’m not ready to step ashore. Thanks


message 2: by David (new)

David Eppenstein Richard Woodman’s Drinkwater series. I found these books even better than OBrian’s books as the hero is much more human as well as the arc of the series.


message 3: by Richard (new)

Richard Boyett | 10 comments Thanks David. I purchased the first book of the Drinkwater series and I’m looking forward to it.


message 4: by Oismiffy (new)

Oismiffy | 1 comments Dewey Lambdin and Julian Stockwin are both worth a read


message 5: by Richard (new)

Richard Boyett | 10 comments Oismiffy wrote: "Dewey Lambdin and Julian Stockwin are both worth a read"

Thanks Dewey. I’ll check them both out.


message 6: by Jeff (new)

Jeff Ritterpusch (jeffritterpusch) | 2 comments Dewey Lambin's Alan Lewry series, Wilbur Smith's Birds of Prey, Monsoon & Blue Horizons


message 7: by Richard (new)

Richard Boyett | 10 comments Jeff wrote: "Dewey Lambin's Alan Lewry series, Wilbur Smith's Birds of Prey, Monsoon & Blue Horizons"

Thanks Jeff. I’ve read and like Wilbur Smith‘s work and I’ve moved Dewey Lambin to the top of my next to read list.


message 8: by Jeff (new)

Jeff Ritterpusch (jeffritterpusch) | 2 comments James L Nelson is good too


message 9: by Daniel (new)

Daniel Schrader | 4 comments David wrote: "Richard Woodman’s Drinkwater series. I found these books even better than OBrian’s books as the hero is much more human as well as the arc of the series."

Woodman's series isn't bad - but, IMHO, in no way does it compare with O'Brien's. I was also put off by the homophobia in the Drinkwater series. That people of the time were anti-gay is no big deal. But it seems like most of the villains in the series were gay or pedophiles or both. YMMV, but it bothered me.


message 10: by David (new)

David Eppenstein Daniel wrote: "David wrote: "Richard Woodman’s Drinkwater series. I found these books even better than OBrian’s books as the hero is much more human as well as the arc of the series."

Woodman's series isn't bad ..."

The homosexuality in a few of the books bothered me as well. I was going to pass my copies of these books onto the son of a friend of mine but this aspect of the stories made that impossible as the boy is too young. However, this issue didn’t appear in very many of Woodman’s books and I let it pass. I don’t know how much this kind of activity occurred in the Royal Navy but since it was considered serious enough to warrant a death sentence I imagine the behavior was a problem. I assumed Woodman attempted to treat the problem existence as a realistic part of life in the Navy at that time. Maybe he could have treated the problem in a different manner but he didn’t. As for my preference for Woodman over O’Brien I liked the the way Woodman allowed his hero to age and grow with time and to have real human faults and deficiencies. The Drinkwater character was developed as a real human man and not some exceptionally talented, all knowing, physically perfect, fictional hero. I don’t disparage O’Brien one bit but I found the Drinkwater series more enjoyable so I guess it’s simply a matter of taste, chocolate v vanilla. Thanks for the comment.


message 11: by Richard (new)

Richard Boyett | 10 comments As long as Nelson, Woodman, etc. give us interesting characters, realistic plots and a avenue of escape I’ll keep turning pages. Thanks for the suggestions.


message 12: by Tom (new)

Tom Behr) (tom_behr) | 6 comments Hi All
First an acknowledgement. I'm an author (and a life-long sailor), recommending his own books. That said, my two Napoleonic War novels have gotten excellent professional reviews and very positive Amazon reader feedback.
Blood Brothers was the 2017 Bronze Medal Winner from the Military Writers Association of America, and its sequel, The Most
Bold and Daring Act of the Age
was shortlisted for the Publisher's Weekly Book Life Prize. The Publisher's Weekly reviewer wrote: "A rip-roaring, fast-paced, skillfully-told adventure. Fans of Patrick O'Brien will be delighted."
I pay particular attention, as an author, to exploring how my main characters change and grow with time as they encounter their own vulnerabilitiesBlood Brothers: A Novel of Courage and Treachery on the Shores of Tripoli.
The Most Bold and Daring Act of the Age: A Henry Doyle Novel
The context of Blood Brothers is America's failed 1805 war against Tripoli. The Most Bold and Daring Act of the Age takes a Tom Stoppard "Rosencrantz and Guildernstern Are Dead" spin on O'Brian's 100 Days by exploring what happens in Algiers when Stephen is NOT present in the story.
I'd welcome comments: www.tombehrbooks.com
Thanks


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