Breaking The Code To The Catcher In The Rye discussion

The Catcher in the Rye
This topic is about The Catcher in the Rye
36 views
Breaking The Code to the Catcher In The Rye: Little Shirley Bean

Comments Showing 1-3 of 3 (3 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

Cosmic Arcata | 198 comments Mod
Little Shirley Bean

"I started walking over toward Broadway, just for the hell of it, because I hadn't been over there in years. Besides, I wanted to find a record store that was open on Sunday. There was this record I wanted to get for Phoebe, called "Little Shirley Beans." It was a very hard record to get. It was about a little kid that wouldn't go out of the house because two of her front teeth were out and she was ashamed to. I heard it at Pencey. " page 14

Shirley Temple's first movie was called "Stand Up And Cheer" . http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stand_...!

"The President of the United States decides that the true cause of the Great Depression (raging when the film was released) is a loss of "optimism" as a result of a plot by financiers and bankers who are getting rich from the Depression. The President then appoints Lawrence Cromwell as secretary for the newly created Department of Amusement."

If you look at 4:00 you will see Shirley dressed up in her military uniform.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QVJv4K...


This is one of my favorite songs from the movie:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pshgQ6...

The next place the record is mentioned is on page 153:
"When I finally got down off the radiator and went out to the hat-check room, I was crying and all. I don't know why, but I was. I guess it was because I was feeling so damn depressed and lonesome. Then, when I went out to the checkroom, I couldn't find my goddam check. The hat-check girl was very nice about it, though. She gave me my coat anyway. And my "Little Shirley Beans" record--I still had it with me and all. I gave her a buck for being so nice, but she wouldn't take it. She kept telling me to go home and go to bed. I sort of tried to make a date with her for when she got through working, but she wouldn't do it. She said she was old enough to be my mother and all. I showed her my goddam gray hair and told her I was forty-two--I was only horsing around, naturally. She was nice, though. I showed her my goddam red hunting hat, and she liked it. She made me put it on before I went out, because my hair was still pretty wet. She was all right. "

It is ironic that Shirley Temple's movie is about optimism and as he talks about is being depressed. He is depressed when he goes to the hat room. Maybe there are other people hunting hats in there. Also notice that he has his hunting hat on...and that he is all wet. I think this is a foreshadow of the carousel, when Holden suits on the park bench with his hat hunting hat, the 'people hunting' hat on his head, getting drenched.

42?
In the spring of 1942, several months after the United States entered World War II, Salinger was drafted into the army, wherein he saw combat with the 12th Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division.
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/J._D._...


https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/...

I think the Bean in the name, "Little Shirley Bean" refers to Roy Bean.
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roy_Bean
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roy_Be...
He walks over to Madison Ave. Then he decides to go to the park and look for the ducks at night. He goes down to Central Park South (page 154) something terrible happens when he gets in the park. Holden drops the record and it breaks into fifty pieces.

Why do you think the number Fifty might be significant?
I found out that:
The word soldier is used 50 times in the Bible.
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/50_(nu...

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Madiso...
Madison Ave was named after James Madison.

" As president (1809–17), James Madison, after the failure of diplomatic protests and a trade embargo against Great Britain, he led the nation into the War of 1812. He was responding to British encroachments on American honor and rights; in addition, he wanted to end the influence of the British among their Indian allies, whose resistance blocked United States settlement in the Midwest around the Great Lakes. Madison found the war to be an administrative nightmare, as the United States had neither a strong army nor financial system; as a result, he afterward supported a stronger national government and a strong military, as well as the national bank, which he had long opposed. "

So this record is a broken record.
How did optimism play a part in the war we are in today?


message 2: by Cosmic (last edited Jul 26, 2014 10:41PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Cosmic Arcata | 198 comments Mod
The record is by Little Shirley Beans.

Who is Beans?

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roy_Bean

Phantly Roy Bean, Jr. (c. 1825 – March 16, 1903) was an eccentric U.S. saloon-keeper and Justice of the Peace in Val Verde County, Texas, who called himself "The Law West of the Pecos". According to legend, Judge Roy Bean held court in his saloon along the Rio Grande in a desolate stretch of the Chihuahuan Desert of southwest Texas. After his death, Western films and books cast him as a hanging judge, though he is known to have sentenced only two men to hang, one of whom escaped.

A Texas Ranger requested that a local law jurisdiction be set up in Vinegaroon, and on August 2, 1882, Bean was appointed Justice of the Peace for the new Precinct 6 in Pecos County.[7] His first case had, however, been heard on 25 July 1882, when Texas Rangers brought him Joe Bell to be tried.[8]

One of his first acts as a justice of the peace was to "shoot[...] up the saloon shack of a Jewish competitor".[7] Bean then turned his tent saloon into a part-time courtroom and began calling himself the "Law West of the Pecos."[7] As judge, Bean relied on a single lawbook, the 1879 edition of the Revised Statutes of Texas. If newer lawbooks appeared, Bean used them as kindling.[9]


Cosmic Arcata | 198 comments Mod
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Madison_...
"The term "Madison Avenue" is often used metonymically for advertising, and Madison Avenue became identified with the American advertising industry after the explosive growth in this area in the 1920s.[citation needed]
According to "The Emergence of Advertising in America", by the year 1861, there were twenty advertising agencies in New York City; and in 1911, the New York City Association of Advertising Agencies was founded, predating the establishment of the American Association of Advertising Agencies by several years.


back to top