Hugo & Nebula Awards: Best Novels discussion

6 views
Random Chatter > Bram Stoker nominations are made if anyone is interested

Comments Showing 1-23 of 23 (23 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

message 1: by Kateblue, 2nd star to the right and straight on til morning (new)

Kateblue | 3586 comments Mod
Article at Amazon HERE:

https://www.amazonbookreview.com/post...


message 2: by Art, Stay home, stay safe. (new)

Art | 2547 comments Mod
A couple of interesting reads there, though it makes me kind of wonder whether old man King's still got it. Haven't read his recent work at all. The last novel of his that I read was Under the Dome.


message 3: by Kateblue, 2nd star to the right and straight on til morning (last edited Mar 31, 2018 09:30AM) (new)

Kateblue | 3586 comments Mod
Here's my take on the books you may have missed. (I liked Under the Dome. They messed it up for the TV series.)

I loved Duma Key, though you probably read that since it is before Under the Dome

What I have read after is here:

I loved Doctor Sleep. I did NOT read The Shining before Dr. Sleep because it scared me to death when I was a kid. But you don't need to. My impression is, he told you any history you needed, and very well, too.

I loved the one with the spaceship in the Maine woods that I can't remember the name of. It might have been before Under the Dome. If you know the name, please tell me. I would like to get a copy.

I did not read the Dark Tower's last book The Wind Through the Keyhole (2012) because I never made it through The Gunslinger, though I tried several times. I kept getting bored and quitting. So I've never read any of them.

I thought 11/22/63 was boring. Good concept interesting, worth it, I guess, but you can tell he is fascinated with all the detail he found during his research. And he put every bit of it in. I bought an expensive Kindle copy because the actual book from the library was too big for me to handle. (This was before my library had so many e-books.)

I loved the Bill Hodges Trilogy. They are murder mystery/suspense and some of the best I have ever read. Bill Hodges is a true hero.
1. Mr. Mercedes (2014)
2. Finders Keepers (2015)
3. End of Watch (2016)

I read Joyland. It was pretty good. Worth the time

I see that there are two coming out this year.

The Outsider on May 22, 2018 and Elevation October 30, 2018. I will wait on long waiting lists at the library for them.

I have Revival on hold from the library because I'd never known about it. I went to look for Stephen King to see what he'd written after Under the Dome. I will tell you what I think.

I had Sleeping Beauties out from the library but I never got to it and it expired. I'm on hold for it again.

His writing just gets better and better, I think.


message 4: by Art, Stay home, stay safe. (new)

Art | 2547 comments Mod
Seems like I've missed quite a few releases, Shining sequel is one I am very interested in and already have purchased. Glad to hear that Hodges trilogy is decent as well.

Oh the one about a spaceship in the woods is probably The Tommyknockers , but then again it is pretty old so it might be that there is another novel that I haven't read yet.

Was looking forward to reading 11/22/63 as well, hope it is still worth reading.


message 5: by Kateblue, 2nd star to the right and straight on til morning (last edited Apr 02, 2018 06:30AM) (new)

Kateblue | 3586 comments Mod
11/22/63 is fine, it's just not as good as the others. I wouldn't say don't read it. Besides, it's probably just me.

Thanks for the info about the tommyknockers.

If you really want a book that seems like it is Stephen King (I thought it was), read NOS4A2 by Joe Hill. Yes, I know he's Stephen King's kid. I read it, and then forgot it, though it was one that I thought about occasionally, and then remembered it later but thought it was by King, and then found it again by accident. Just in time to recommend it to you!


message 6: by Kateblue, 2nd star to the right and straight on til morning (last edited Apr 02, 2018 06:33AM) (new)

Kateblue | 3586 comments Mod
Art, can you recommend some horror that really isn't horror? Like most of Stephen King or like Dean Koontz? Occasionally they are really scary, but more often just really, really, suspenseful and they suck you right in.


message 7: by Art, Stay home, stay safe. (last edited Apr 02, 2018 05:42PM) (new)

Art | 2547 comments Mod
Kateblue wrote: "Art, can you recommend some horror that really isn't horror? Like most of Stephen King or like Dean Koontz? Occasionally they are really scary, but more often just really, really, suspenseful and t..."

This reminds me of the time when I embarked on that very quest of finding a writer similar to S.King. The internet's proved invaluable in my research, with every hit of a search button I received one pearl of wisdom after another.

First search result gave me a suggestion of trying reading work of a little known writer named Richard Bachman (eyroll). Not in the least disheartened I pushed on! The next stop for me would be a website for book lovers where the very question was asked, this time I would definitely get the answer I was looking for! This is how the forum discussion went:
User A: "Does anybody know a good novelist with writing style similar to that of Stephen King's."
The answer provided by User B was prompt and straight to the point;
User B: "I don't know."
At this point I've decided that maybe the collective wisdom of the Internet was probably beyond me so I had to settle for the second best choice of calling up a friend.

There indeed was an author that a friend could recommend to me and I just recently got one of his books on a discount but never got around to actually reading it. Let me look it up!

Robert McCammon's Gone South seemed worth buying so I did, but other novels he wrote have higher ratings so maybe you want to check those out first.

Jack Ketchum was another recommendation but I never got around to checking him out.


message 8: by Kateblue, 2nd star to the right and straight on til morning (last edited Apr 03, 2018 08:22AM) (new)

Kateblue | 3586 comments Mod
LOL Bachman!

Hey, thanks. I have one of Robert McCammon books that was on sale a while ago. Stinger.

I have not heard of Jack ketchum, but I will look for him.

I think Dean Koontz is a good one if you never read any, but I like his older stuff better, like 80s and 90s. I would recommend a few, but the titles are too generic so I can't remember which is which. Let me know if you want me to research and give you 2 or 3 to start with.


message 9: by Art, Stay home, stay safe. (new)

Art | 2547 comments Mod
I suppose that at the moment I will avoid as many recommendations as I can afford to, not in the least because I am not interested but only because my backlog on to-reads is about 72-73 year-long.

I remember reading Koontz once and it was pretty enjoyable, though you are absolutely correct in regard to his book titles, they are all so generic I doubt that even the author himself keeps track of them any longer.


message 10: by Kateblue, 2nd star to the right and straight on til morning (last edited Apr 03, 2018 09:18PM) (new)

Kateblue | 3586 comments Mod
I have an idea. What if we read the winners first and the nominees second? Because I will be dead before we get through all of these books.

Except for the series of course. We will have to make decisions on those.

Here's a list (modified from Brian's Spreadsheet)

H 1939 White, T. H. Sword in the Stone
H 1941 Vogt, A. E. van Slan
H 1946 Asimov, Isaac The Mule
H 1951 Heinlein, Robert A. Farmer in the Sky
H 1953 Bester, Alfred The Demolished Man
H 1954 Bradbury, Ray Fahrenheit 451
H 1955 Clifton, Mark & Riley, Frank They'd Rather Be Right (a/k/a The Forever Machine)
H 1956 Heinlein, Robert A. Double Star
H 1958 Leiber, Fritz The Big Time
H 1959 Blish, James A Case of Conscience
H 1960 Heinlein, Robert A. Starship Troopers
H 1961 Miller, Jr., Walter M. A Canticle for Leibowitz
H 1962 Heinlein, Robert A. Stranger in a Strange Land
H 1963 Dick, Philip K. The Man in the High Castle
H 1964 Simak, Clifford D. Here Gather the Stars (also known as Way Station)
H 1965 Leiber, Fritz The Wanderer
H/N 1966 Herbert, Frank Dune
H 1966 Zelazny, Roger ...And Call Me Conrad (also known as This Immortal)
H 1967 Heinlein, Robert A. The Moon Is a Harsh Mistress
N 1967 Delany, Samuel R Babel-17
N 1967 Keyes, Daniel Flowers for Algernon
H 1968 Zelazny, Roger Lord of Light
N 1968 Delany, Samuel R. The Einstein Intersection
H 1969 Brunner, John Stand on Zanzibar
N 1969 Panshin, Alexei Rite of Passage
H/N 1970 Le Guin, Ursula K. The Left Hand of Darkness
H/N 1971 Niven, Larry Ringworld
H 1972 Farmer, Philip José To Your Scattered Bodies Go
N 1972 Silverberg, Robert A Time of Changes
H/N 1973 Asimov, Isaac The Gods Themselves
H/N 1974 Clarke, Arthur C. Rendezvous with Rama
H/N 1975 Le Guin, Ursula K. The Dispossessed
H/N 1976 Haldeman, Joe The Forever War
H 1977 Wilhelm, Kate Where Late the Sweet Birds Sang
N 1977 Pohl, Frederik Man Plus
H/N 1978 Pohl, Frederik Gateway
H/N 1979 McIntyre, Vonda N. Dreamsnake
H/N 1980 Clarke, Arthur C. The Fountains of Paradise
H 1981 Vinge, Joan D. The Snow Queen
N 1981 Benford, Gregory Timescape
H 1982 Cherryh, C. J. Downbelow Station
N 1982 Wolfe, Gene The Claw of the Conciliator
H 1983 Asimov, Isaac Foundation's Edge
N 1983 Bishop, Michael No Enemy But Time
H/N 1984 Brin, David Startide Rising
H/N 1985 Gibson, William Neuromancer
H/N 1986 Card, Orson Scott Ender's Game
H/N 1987 Card, Orson Scott Speaker for the Dead
H 1988 Brin, David The Uplift War
N 1988 Murphy, Pat The Falling Woman
H 1989 Cherryh, C. J. Cyteen
N 1989 Bujold, Lois McMaster Falling Free
H 1990 Simmons, Dan Hyperion
N 1990 Scarborough, Elizabeth Ann The Healer's War
H 1991 Bujold, Lois McMaster The Vor Game
N 1991 Le Guin, Ursula K. Tehanu: The Last Book of Earthsea
H 1992 Bujold, Lois McMaster Barrayar
N 1992 Swanwick, Michael Stations of the Tide
H 1993 Vinge, Vernor A Fire Upon the Deep
H/N 1993 Willis, Connie Doomsday Book
N 1994 Robinson, Kim Stanley Red Mars
H 1994 Robinson, Kim Stanley Green Mars
N 1995 Bear, Greg Moving Mars
H 1995 Bujold, Lois McMaster Mirror Dance
H 1996 Stephenson, Neal The Diamond Age
N 1996 Sawyer, Robert J. The Terminal Experiment (also known as Hobson's Choice)
H 1997 Robinson, Kim Stanley Blue Mars
N 1997 Griffith, Nicola Slow River
H/N 1998 Haldeman, Joe Forever Peace
N 1998 McIntyre, Vonda N. The Moon and the Sun
H 1999 Willis, Connie To Say Nothing of the Dog
H 2000 Vinge, Vernor A Deepness in the Sky
N 2001 Bear, Greg Darwin's Radio
N 2000 Butler, Octavia E. Parable of the Talents
H 2001 Rowling, J. K. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
H/N 2002/2003 Gaiman, Neil American Gods
N 2002 Asaro, Catherine The Quantum Rose
H 2003 Sawyer, Robert J. Hominids
H/N 2004/2005 Bujold, Lois McMaster Paladin of Souls
N 2004 Moon, Elizabeth The Speed of Dark
H 2005 Clarke, Susanna Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell
H 2006 Wilson, Robert Charles Spin
N 2006 Haldeman, Joe Camouflage
H 2007 Vinge, Vernor Rainbows End
N 2007 McDevitt, Jack Seeker
H/N 2008 Chabon, Michael The Yiddish Policemen's Union
H 2009 Gaiman, Neil The Graveyard Book
N 2009 Le Guin, Ursula K. Powers
H/N 2010 Bacigalupi, Paolo The Windup Girl
H 2010 Miéville, China The City & the City
H/N 2011 Willis, Connie Blackout/All Clear
H/N 2012 Walton, Jo Among Others
H 2013 Scalzi, John Redshirts
N 2013 Robinson, Kim Stanley x2312
H/N 2014 Leckie, Ann Ancillary Justice
H 2015 Liu, Cixin & Liu, Ken The Three-Body Problem
H 2016 Jemisin, N. K. The Fifth Season
N 2016 Novik, Naomi Uprooted
N 2015 Leckie, Ann Ancillary Mercy
H 2017 Jemisin, N. K. The Obelisk Gate
N 2017 Anders, Charlie Jane All the Birds in the Sky


message 11: by Art, Stay home, stay safe. (last edited Apr 04, 2018 05:30AM) (new)

Art | 2547 comments Mod
Kateblue wrote: "I have an idea. What if we read the winners first and the nominees second? Because I will be dead before we get through all of these books.

Except for the series of course. We will have to make d..."


Well, it is an idea that I initially thought a lot about, but I am not sure that it is the direction I would like to take. Not in the least because I have already read a good chunk of that list, but also it would take merely a year or two tops to finish reading all that.

To be honest, those members who wish to focus on the winners first have the power to steer the whole group in that direction. Nominations and voting were especially set up in that way so that if you wanted to, you could push for the Monthly Read to be an award-winning title instead of a nominee.

I believe once more people will start voting you will find that the majority will vote for one of the winners over a nominee. Furthermore themed bookshelf nominations allow for such selective voting since we change categories every month and there are plenty of winners on every shelf.

I for instance have already selected a title for the next round of nominations (https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/...) and it is both Hugo and Nebula winner (Dispossessed) and I haven't decided about the rest. Of course all of your nominations may be exclusively from this very list you made. I sincerely believe that winners will always get more votes once more and more people will start voting.


message 12: by Kateblue, 2nd star to the right and straight on til morning (last edited Apr 04, 2018 07:18AM) (new)

Kateblue | 3586 comments Mod
OK, just an idea. It's just . . . These Nebula award books! I'm > halfway through the difference engine, and though I am probably going to finish, not having much fun. And you know how much I love that Darwin Radio! There are some other N nominees I have started and not finished in the past, too, I figured out. I will stuff the ballot box! (HA!)

I just think that the authors are looking for something different that what we are.


message 13: by Kateblue, 2nd star to the right and straight on til morning (new)

Kateblue | 3586 comments Mod
Art, I'm sticking this note here to you because we were chatting about Stephen King books in the thread . . .

Revival came out of "hold" status at my library. I realized right away I had already read it and I remembered I loved it. Suspenseful and weirdly wonderful as he usually is. I highly recommend it.


message 14: by Art, Stay home, stay safe. (new)

Art | 2547 comments Mod
Ought to check it out, though I might be reading Duma Key next because I apparently missed it.


message 15: by Kateblue, 2nd star to the right and straight on til morning (new)

Kateblue | 3586 comments Mod
I liked Duma Key even better.


message 16: by Oleksandr, a.k.a. Z (new)

Oleksandr Zholud | 3379 comments Mod
Regarding reading only winners I vehemently disagree. For last few years I tried to read all nominated novels and often I disagree that winner was the best.


message 17: by Kateblue, 2nd star to the right and straight on til morning (new)

Kateblue | 3586 comments Mod
Oleksandr, I agree with Hugos that the popular vote might be a popularity contest and so the winners might not be the best. Of course, all of these might be popularity contests!

I suggested this because the task of reading them all is daunting. I thought that perhaps we could start with the winners. But I'm good, either way.

After Darwin's Radio and The Difference Engine, I am going to just stop reading if I am not having fun, so my problem is solved that way!


message 18: by Oleksandr, a.k.a. Z (new)

Oleksandr Zholud | 3379 comments Mod
Of course I cannot be sure what you'd like but based on the fact that you liked Ursula K. Le Guin trilogy some fantasy can be in order. I suggest that you try
N 2016 Novik, Naomi Uprooted
If you prefer SF I guess you can like
H 2015 Liu, Cixin & Liu, Ken The Three-Body Problem
H 2013 Scalzi, John Redshirts
N 2006 Haldeman, Joe Camouflage
Just try them to see if I guessed your tastes correctly.


message 19: by Kateblue, 2nd star to the right and straight on til morning (last edited Apr 15, 2018 09:15AM) (new)

Kateblue | 3586 comments Mod
Hey, Oleksandr, I thought I answered this already, so if you see something else similar, sorry.

I loved Red Shirts
I have Uprooted on hold from the library. I didn't realize it was one on our list
I will wait for 3 body problem until we read it. I had if from the library once, but had to return it, no time. Seemed kind of dry in the first few pages. Maybe it's just the way Chinese translates?
I will look for Joe Camoflage, though I will probably just wait for us to read it, also.

Thanks!


message 20: by Oleksandr, a.k.a. Z (new)

Oleksandr Zholud | 3379 comments Mod
Kateblue wrote: "I will wait for 3 body problem until we read it. I had if from the library once, but had to return it, no time. Seemed kind of dry in the first few pages. Maybe it's just the way Chinese translates? ."

I guess it is not the translation but the Chinese style of writing, which in some cases seems bombastic and childish, overblown. However, I liked it because it was something quite unusual and the ideas are quite in style of old SF, which I love for nostalgia sake. For me it looked like some 13 year old get a list of good ideas and decided to write like adults do - e.g. the love line is just ridiculous


message 21: by Kateblue, 2nd star to the right and straight on til morning (new)

Kateblue | 3586 comments Mod
Ha. I thought it seemed a trifle . . . dense.


message 22: by Oleksandr, a.k.a. Z (new)

Oleksandr Zholud | 3379 comments Mod
Kateblue wrote: "Ha. I thought it seemed a trifle . . . dense."

I improves after the initial "cultural revolution" part is over, but the style remains peculiar


message 23: by Kateblue, 2nd star to the right and straight on til morning (new)

Kateblue | 3586 comments Mod
well, then, I will just wait until we all read it. Maybe I will skip the cultural revolution part.


back to top