Goodreads Authors/Readers discussion

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III. Goodreads Readers > Question for readers: How should an "Author & Readers" relationship be?

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message 1: by Douglas (last edited Aug 27, 2014 02:35AM) (new)

Douglas Rugambwa (douglasr) | 51 comments Hi! I'm Douglas R. This topic is about How a relationship between authors and their readers should be.
I believe an author + readers relationship is meant to be fun, engaging, inspiring, awe-inspiring, a way to connect, share and keep in touch.
I think authors should be closer to their readers. What do you think? Would love to hear your feedback!!

I've written a little book about this discussion. You can watch the trailer and get it here for free:

https://www.goodreads.com/videos/7047...

Much Love!
#dream #grow #believe #love


message 2: by Henry (new)

Henry Martin (henrymartin) The relationship between an author and a reader should be exactly what the reader desires it to be. The author has no right to require any relationship from the reader.

The inclusion of "awe-inspiring" in your post comes across as 'superior', in my humble opinion. Readers need not look up to authors (which "awe-inspiring" suggests) and authors should not look down on readers.

In the end, an author needs readers more than readers need an author. This is, of course, my opinion as an author.

As a reader, I do not wish to communicate with authors unless I initiate the conversation and unless I expressly give the author permission to contact me (whether it is a subscription service, fan newsletter, et cetera). I very much dislike authors soliciting readers or other authors.

Then again, there are authors and there are 'authors' - I would have loved to share a cup of coffee with some who are, unfortunately, long gone. Of contemporary authors, there are very few that interest me enough to even exchange an email.


message 3: by Arabella (last edited Jul 24, 2014 04:42PM) (new)

Arabella Thorne (arabella_thornejunocom) | 354 comments As an author its nice to know someone actually read and enjoyed your book....or didn't.
No one likes to create and leave their work in a void...Response of some kind is great!
As a reader---yeah--there's only a few authors I really wished I could meet (Mark Twain!!)
And authors work is solitary--and so is reading, mostly.
I am okay with that!


message 4: by Renee E (new)

Renee E Writers are people.

Any relationships should be predicated on that.


message 5: by Cphe (new)

Cphe | 30 comments I have to agree with Henry here.

I don't understand why readers need to have an awe inspiring relationship with authors in any shape or form.

Reading is a personnal experience and should IMO be about the book not the author.


message 6: by Melissa (last edited Jul 24, 2014 05:04PM) (new)

Melissa Veracruz (melissaveracruz) | 96 comments I'm Indie, and I think a reader-writer relationship nowadays is crucial. With blogs, video blogging, YouTube, Twitter, etc., the writer has an unprecedented chance to give feedback, become acquainted with, and knit a very close and personal relationship with their readership.

We didn't have the chance to ask Edgar Allen Poe about that crazy bird, but if he were alive today, we sure could.

I just think, in this computer age, even more than in-person book signings, readers want to feel closer to the storyteller.


message 7: by Jim (last edited Jul 24, 2014 07:47PM) (new)

Jim Vuksic | 1030 comments I do not believe that "relationship" is the appropriate term for the author/reader connection.

The only one-on-one communications, with which I am personally comfortable, are those initiated by a reader; utilizing either the communication page of my novel's website, created and maintained by the publisher, the comment box at the bottom of each post in my blog, or personal messages sent via a literary website's message system or Ask the Author segments. Such communications are deserving of, and always do receive, a timely and thorough direct response from me.

I never intiate contact and, after responding to a specific comment, question, or suggestion, do not encourage an on-going dialogue; however I gladly answer follow up or additional questions from the reader in a timely fashion; usually within 72 hours or less.


message 8: by K.P. (new)

K.P. Merriweather (kp_merriweather) | 276 comments i wouldnt know since no one reads my books and the few who did usually never finish it and lay the haterade thick. its a pain trying to keep up with all this social media stuff. my phone wont keep a charge my expensive internet is slow and the library isnt much better. my laptop overheats and my pc is still broken since i cant afford new parts. being a poor obscure writer is really trashing my ego. i carry on writing though. not much else in life really.


message 9: by Ken (new)

Ken Doggett (kendoggett) K.P. wrote: " i carry on writing though. not much else in life really..."
Wow, there really is much more out there, an infinite variety of things to become interested in. If you like books, consider a job as a part-time librarian to supplement your income, and there must be any number of other things you might enjoy doing. Occasional feelings of depression are part of writing, unfortunately, at least for most of us. In the meantime, continue to hone your talent as a writer, master the mechanics of it, grammar, spelling, plotting, and maybe eventually write that great novel that gets you recognized. Pessimism is never disappointed, but optimism keeps you going.


message 10: by K.P. (new)

K.P. Merriweather (kp_merriweather) | 276 comments Ken wrote: Wow, there really is much more out there, an infinite variety of things to become interested in."
dude im poor living in the hood. i work part time as a desk jockey for a small publishing company. work isnt meaningful just enough to keep roof overhead. 200 weekly goes fast. ive been writing all my life went to school got degrees and still struggling. i would quit but im overqualified for a lot of jobs where i live. writing is my only outlet. i dont have any other useful skills aside secreterial and low level programmer. ive been print since 2005 and made no sales. i cant afford schooling to keep up on the latest languages. so i keep writing hoping something sticks. ive been "honing my talent" damn near 20 years. something shouldve come out of it by now -_-


message 11: by Henry (new)

Henry Martin (henrymartin) K.P. - Sorry, but you are in a public forum presenting yourself as (I assume) an author. A little bit of proper punctuation would surely go a long way to show you are taking this seriously.

As it stands, you may say the most brilliant things I have heard all week, but I will never know because I refuse to read a post with all lower-case letters, missing apostrophes, et cetera.


message 12: by Jim (last edited Jul 24, 2014 08:24PM) (new)

Jim Vuksic | 1030 comments K.P. wrote: "Ken wrote: Wow, there really is much more out there, an infinite variety of things to become interested in."
dude im poor living in the hood. i work part time as a desk jockey for a small publishin..."


K.P. wrote: "Ken wrote: Wow, there really is much more out there, an infinite variety of things to become interested in."
dude im poor living in the hood. i work part time as a desk jockey for a small publishin..."


K.P.

Most writers hope to one day become commercially successful, so that writing may be their sole career and provide for a reasonably comfortable lifestyle. This a worthy goal. Don't permit anyone to dissuade you from nurtuing your dream. Some dreams do come true.

That said; please allow me to share a bit of wisdom that comes with age and experience.

Life is no big thing; it is a thousand little things. Too often, we hardly notice the thousand wonderful little things going on around us; some of which could have a profound impact upon our lives, because we are so focused upon waiting for that one big thing to happen.

By all means, continue to nurture your dream; it may come true. The ones that do are usually those that include hard work, study, practice, patience, perseverance, and the occasional reality check.

Meanwhile, keep your options open; just in case it doesn't, and have an alternative plan in place. Another dream may be just waiting for you to acknowledge its presence, recognize its potential, and be willing to perform the hard work, study, and the occasional reality check to make it come true.

Whatever future awaits you, I sincerely hope that it is bright and rewarding.


message 13: by S. (new)

S. Aksah | 387 comments That's a very interesting question you are asking there. I suspect the answers would differ between the type of authors. There are those who are still struggling, there are those who are social media savvy, there are those who are already successful etc etc.

Personally to be successful in this age, I think an author would need to touch base with the readers, just like artiste nowadays are more connected to their fans :)


Paganalexandria I personally like to keep my favorite authors at a distance. I don't like digging too much into their personal life because I don't want to compare fact, with fiction. I didn't use to feel this way until discovering a couple of favorites were kind of horrible people, which interfered with me liking their work. I prefer to read blind, so to speak.


message 15: by Douglas (new)

Douglas Rugambwa (douglasr) | 51 comments Henry wrote: "The relationship between an author and a reader should be exactly what the reader desires it to be. The author has no right to require any relationship from the reader.

The inclusion of "awe-insp..."


Thank You so much Henry for your opinions. I agree authors do need readers more. As an author myself, the readers are the most important.
You have a point with the awe-inspiring thing... perhaps "inspiring" is the better term.


message 16: by Douglas (new)

Douglas Rugambwa (douglasr) | 51 comments Arabella wrote: "As an author its nice to know someone actually read and enjoyed your book....or didn't.
No one likes to create and leave their work in a void...Response of some kind is great!
As a reader---yeah--t..."


Thank you for your comment, Arabella!


message 17: by Douglas (new)

Douglas Rugambwa (douglasr) | 51 comments Renee wrote: "Writers are people.

Any relationships should be predicated on that."


Totallu agree with you!


message 18: by Douglas (new)

Douglas Rugambwa (douglasr) | 51 comments Melissa wrote: "I'm Indie, and I think a reader-writer relationship nowadays is crucial. With blogs, video blogging, YouTube, Twitter, etc., the writer has an unprecedented chance to give feedback, become acquaint..."

Thanks Melissa! You remind me of when I had a chat with a reader and they told me it was great to actually converse one on one with an author. It's really great to fill that gap!


message 19: by Douglas (new)

Douglas Rugambwa (douglasr) | 51 comments S. wrote: "Personally to be successful in this age, I think an author would need to touch base with the readers, just like artiste nowadays are more connected to their fans :) "

I think that's the fun way to go. I enjoy learning more about my readers.


message 20: by Douglas (new)

Douglas Rugambwa (douglasr) | 51 comments Paganalexandria **wicked juices bubbling over** wrote: "I personally like to keep my favorite authors at a distance. I don't like digging too much into their personal life because I don't want to compare fact, with fiction. I didn't use to feel this way..."

Woah, I never really thought of that. That must be a turn-off to you.


message 21: by Christine (new)

Christine Hayton (ccmhayton) | 324 comments Douglas wrote: "...This topic is about How a relationship between authors and their readers should be..."

As a reader, I find interaction with authors is often awkward and many make unreasonable demands. They want readers to support them, give them great reviews, and promote their books. Whether it is a genre the reader enjoys, is of no consequence.

I am an avid reader, and have stated in more than one thread here, that I check out authors I meet in discussions and have found good writers and excellent books that way (I don't trust reviews anymore).

As for your question, I don't want a relationship with any author because I read his/her book. I also don't want authors to feel they can communicate with me because I did a review or commented on their book. That was for the benefit of other readers, not the writer.

Many self-published writers seem to feel they're special or entitled, and the relationships they seek with readers is ONLY about being noticed and selling books. Just look at all the promo included in the comment you wrote to open this discussion.

I much prefer the old days when writers got drunk or stoned to fulfill their social needs, while their exceptional writing sold their books...



message 22: by Henry (new)

Henry Martin (henrymartin) Christine wrote: "Many self-published writers seem to feel they're special or entitled, and the relationships they seek with readers is ONLY about being noticed and selling books. Just look at all the promo included in the comment you wrote to open this discussion.

I much prefer the old days when writers got drunk or stoned to fulfill their social needs, while their exceptional writing sold their books... "


Hallelujah!


message 23: by Renee E (last edited Jul 25, 2014 07:40AM) (new)

Renee E Christine wrote: "I much prefer the old days when writers got drunk or stoned to fulfill their social needs, while their exceptional writing sold their books... "

I'd agree, except the "old days" are gone. The days when publishers brought new authors to the attention of the reading public, nurtured the and actually marketed their work.

That's all gone.

Writers, whether published by traditional means or indie now have to do their own publicity and marketing. If we don't get out there and get our work into the hands of readers it dies.

The brightest and best don't necessarily make it under the new rules — come to think of it, it's always been whoever has the best salesman — and that's a damn shame for both writers and readers.


message 24: by K.P. (new)

K.P. Merriweather (kp_merriweather) | 276 comments Jim wrote: "Most writers hope to one day become commercially successful, so that writing may be their sole career and provide for a reasonably comfortable lifestyle. This a worthy goal. Don't permit anyone to dissuade you from nurtuing your dream. Some dreams do come true."

Thanks, Jim. It's been difficult here trying to keep my head up and brush my shoulders off. You must have a lot of positive people in your life. Me, I'm surrounded by naysayers and haters. Folks out here are like crabs, just keep pulling you down if you try to get up. I'm always told my writing sucks, my art sucks, and whatever I put my mind to, I'll never succeed.

I'm trying to escape the hood mentality. I don't fit here. Smart intelligent people in the hood do not work here. If i had the money to move, I would, but I'm grinding away at a nowhere job barely making ends meet.

My dad always said if you got haters, they're jealous because you're doing something right and must be awesome. I sure hope so, the amount of haterade I get.

Renee wrote: "The brightest and best don't necessarily make it under the new rules — come to think of it, it's always been whoever has the best salesman — and that's a damn shame for both writers and readers...."

That's my biggest sticking point. I hate talking to people in person (I have a stutter) and I always don't have access to the internet (slow and expensive at home, phone is slow and doesn't keep charge, library internet is slow and the damn kids are bothersome). Also, marketing requires a shite tonne of money, which I blew my life savings on 10 years ago over 1 book (and hence broke as a joke now). That money did nothing to push sales of the book. I later learned it was meh cover art. >_<


message 25: by Renee E (new)

Renee E K.P., you're in a spot where you're going to have to (gods, but I loathe this phrase) project yourself out of the box you're stuck in.

Any time I have to stand in front of people and talk, read, etc. it is a major trauma event for me. I don't know why, other than years of conditioning from the Family From Hell, but that's the way it is. I'm having to make myself suck it up, channel my inner Fila and do it. And keep reminding myself that it's okay to be imperfect. Even laughably, lamentably imperfect.

Then I work on convincing myself that some of my imperfections are unique and charming . . . but I'm a terrible liar.

I live in an area that's a true cultural ghetto. No, make that a cultural vacuum. 40 miles away is Knoxville, so I scrape together what I can and go to writers' guild meetings and participate. It really helps to be among at least some like minds. See if you can find something like that.

Look for little havens of artsy-ness. Nurture and polish the things about yourself that you feel are perceived as being weird, freakish or not good enough and realize they're eccentricities. Eccentricities are essential for an artist!

And if a desperately unemployed paralegal can help an under-employed library-desker, drop me a message and we'll talk.


message 26: by Abigail (new)

Abigail Sharpe (abigailsharpe) I met a favorite author. She was rude and superior. I've had a hard time reading her books since.

I met another favorite author who was gracious and charming and I still read her books with abandon.


message 27: by K.P. (last edited Jul 25, 2014 09:47AM) (new)

K.P. Merriweather (kp_merriweather) | 276 comments Renee wrote: "I'm having to make myself suck it up, channel my inner Fila and do it. And keep reminding myself that it's okay to be imperfect. Even laughably, lamentably imperfect...."

Heh! Right on! Then that calls for redbull and tom collins! (to rid the stutter!)

I've gone out to these little artsy whatnots for artists and writers in the past, and it was always totally awkward and I felt like I stuck out like a huuuge sore thumb. (I'm usually the only brown person there). I usually keep an airplane bottle on me after the first disaster (I stuttered so bad, no one wanted to talk to me). I'll keep trying though, even if i do look foolish. It gives me something to do aside from work...


message 28: by Christine (new)

Christine Hayton (ccmhayton) | 324 comments Renee wrote: "...The days when publishers brought new authors to the attention of the reading public, nurtured and actually marketed their work...writers, whether published by traditional means or indie now have to do their own publicity and marketing..."

I'm not sure who preaches that traditional publishers make the writers do all the marketing, but they're WRONG. Obviously any writer needs to work their own online platform, regardless of the publisher. (I'm not sure who else could do that)

Traditional publishers definitely promote their writers and books and provide excellent marketing via book stores, conventions, professional reviews, book signings, commercial advertising, etc.



message 29: by Renee E (last edited Jul 25, 2014 09:56AM) (new)

Renee E Christine, that's what writers who are under contract with traditional publishers, large and small houses, even those who have made high-profile best seller lists, are experiencing. And telling, even when they've tried to circumvent the questions in their loyalty to their publishers. When pinned down, they're honest about it.

Sometimes their publishers will set them up with events and marketing, but it's rare and the writer (unless you're a top-tier moneymaker for the pub) foots the bill up front.

Look at the established writers who are flirting with Indie pubbing. They aren't doing it to kill time.

Things change.

Or all of the traditionally published writers who have made those statements are lying?


message 30: by Douglas (new)

Douglas Rugambwa (douglasr) | 51 comments Abigail wrote: "I met a favorite author. She was rude and superior. I've had a hard time reading her books since.

I met another favorite author who was gracious and charming and I still read her books with aban..."


I guess whatever we call ourselves, writers, painters, sailsmen, stuntmen, gardeners.. we arr still people and people can be warm and inviting and generous or cold and proud.

Thanks for commenting!


message 31: by Christine (new)

Christine Hayton (ccmhayton) | 324 comments @K.P.and Renee: I don't usually recommend books, but both of you need to understand you can change how the world around you affects your life.

Norman Vincent Peale wrote a book in the mid 1940s titled, "The Power of Positive Thinking". Please find it and read it.


message 32: by Renee E (new)

Renee E Read it.

I also read Pollyanna.


message 33: by Douglas (last edited Jul 25, 2014 10:04AM) (new)

Douglas Rugambwa (douglasr) | 51 comments To K.P.

OMG I can imagine what that must feel like! I dont know what your haters are telling you but I dont care. Maybe you can send me some of your writing so I can have a look and be of some help. Plus why not tell me more about your writing life and have a chat?
Email is: duggyparks@gmail.com

You're a great, talented writer and I believe you can still achieve all you want. Dont let anyone bring you down. Remember what Napoleon said?

"I see only the objective, the obstacle must give way!"

Oh, and much love :-)


message 34: by K.P. (last edited Jul 25, 2014 10:16AM) (new)

K.P. Merriweather (kp_merriweather) | 276 comments hehe @Douglas, sure I'll send you something. I'm bascially giving books away since nobody's buying.

@Christine - yeah, those "self-help" books only make money for the folks who wrote it. I own that, and shite tonnes more of them. I can be positive all I like and still bust my ass getting nowhere. In the end, I'm still stuck in the hood. Hard work and determiniation does not get one out the ghetto. It's money, tonnes of it, and I'll probably still be slaving away 20 years from now doing the samn damn thing (barely making ends meet, but enough to keep a roof over my head). Unless I get super lucky, all I got so show for it is boxes of unsold books and dying in the gutter still obscure not leaving a mark on this planet. Thank you and good night. *drops mic*


message 35: by Christine (new)

Christine Hayton (ccmhayton) | 324 comments Renee wrote: "Christine, that's what writers who are under contract with traditional publishers, large and small houses, even those who have made high-profile best seller lists, are experiencing..."

I'm not sure where your info is coming from, but there are always self-published bloggers and publishers that dwell on the "evils" of traditional to promote themselves or their business.

Small traditional publishers require writers to cover some of their own expenses until book sales reach a certain level, but even given their small size, they are definitely promoting the writers and the books.

Major traditional publishers pay an advances to the writer based on the book's expected performance. I'm sure some minor costs are covered by new writers - but those token amounts wouldn't make a big dent in the advance.

James Rollins was just paid almost $15 million for four books. He does NOT do his own promotion.

You are making incorrect/confusing statements - please cite and clarify, because obviously we aren't taking about the same thing.



message 36: by Lisa (last edited Jul 25, 2014 11:00AM) (new)

Lisa Marie Gabriel (lisamariegabriel) | 207 comments Writing is a solitary occupation for the most part and so is reading. To demand any sort of relationship between reader and author seems odd to me. Some readers and writers are happier engaging socially than others of course but others really don't want to seek out interaction. In this day and age authors probably do have to embrace the necessary evil of social networking on Twitter, Facebook or elsewhere, but I am sure many writers would rather be writing than building lists of contacts.


message 37: by Martyn (new)

Martyn Halm (amsterdamassassinseries) | 916 comments Douglas wrote: "Hi! I'm Douglas R. This topic is about How a relationship between authors and their readers should be."

I think the relationship between authors and readers should be as they should be between any human being: mutually respectful and appreciative.

I enjoy getting letters/emails from readers, so I always answer them, even if it's just to thank them. I also try to answer any questions they have, unless their questions are about what's going to happen with the characters in future publications.

Most communications I've had with readers up till now have been pleasant, informative and interesting. From the reader perspective, I've had wonderful conversations with authors.


message 38: by Renee E (last edited Jul 25, 2014 11:35AM) (new)

Renee E Christine wrote: "Renee wrote: "Christine, that's what writers who are under contract with traditional publishers, large and small houses, even those who have made high-profile best seller lists, are experiencing......"

Of COURSE James Rollins was paid $15 mil. He's long established and put more than that in the publisher's account already.

If you aren't of that stature, you won't get that.

One writer, for example (Vince Vawter, Paperboy) received a $10,000 advance. He wisely set that back to use for the marketing and promotion that the publisher set up. He also had to seek out and orchestrate a good bit of it on his own. The publisher charged him for all editing services, cover creation, blurbs, etc.

I belong to a fairly large writers' guild and we bring in (and have members) who are established, not in the James Rollins realm, but they've had at least one novel on NYT and/or one of the other major bestseller lists and they've had the same experience.

At least that is what they have stated publicly. Perhaps you know different?

One has finally extricated himself from his publishing contract and is elated. And he likes his publisher and they still correspond as friends.

So no, if you're talking about the ginormous grabillion generating authors we aren't talking about the same thing. They aren't comparable.


message 39: by Douglas (new)

Douglas Rugambwa (douglasr) | 51 comments Lisa wrote: "Writing is a solitary occupation for the most part and so is reading. To demand any sort of relationship between reader and author seems odd to me. Some readers and writers are happier engaging soc..."

An author/reader connection should never be demanded. They should ask but ultimately it's the readers choice to give that permission.

Sometimes authors are all about "BUY MY BOOK" on social media and that's the wrong way to do it. It takes generosity and listening to make it work well just like any other relationship between people. This is currently best done via email lists.

But like any other conversation, it's not everbody who will "click" with you. It depends on the author and the reader. Some are up for it. Others loathe it.

There's no single right way to view this. It's always going to be a different picture based on the person's point of view.

Thanks for commenting, Lisa.


message 40: by Stephen (new)

Stephen (readytoescape) | 12 comments Personally, I like my readers. If they have questions about the stories I write, I answer them happily. Their queries, demonstrate they have actually purchased and read my books. Further the more discussion they engage in, and the more in-depth they are, the more I can determine how well I conveyed the story.
Mostly I like to pull up a bar stool and be asked, “Hey when is your next book coming out?”


message 41: by Melissa (new)

Melissa Veracruz (melissaveracruz) | 96 comments I read... after I published... that Indies need to build their platform before publishing. I'm not sure how else to build that without interacting.

Maybe I'm going about it wrong... :-) It would seem that if it is up to me to reach readers for myself, I'd need social media. Goodreads is social media.

I also have to contact potential readers to get reviews and reach bloggers who can help me.

Then, I hope that my writing is good enough that my platform would like to reach out to me...


message 42: by Douglas (new)

Douglas Rugambwa (douglasr) | 51 comments Melissa wrote: "I read... after I published... that Indies need to build their platform before publishing. I'm not sure how else to build that without interacting.

Maybe I'm going about it wrong... :-) It would s..."


Melissa that's true and also not so true, you can still build a fanbase even after publishing. I believe that rule is flexible. Be creative and know that generosity is extremely important when finding your readers. And it's also easy to reach bloggers by actually trying to help them with whatever you can and when you do, you build trust and relationships.
I learned some of this the hard way :-)
But the best part is that you don't have to make marketing about you, you get to make it about helping others or giving people a great time/convenience or just showing your human generosity.

Stephen wrote: Mostly I like to pull up a bar stool and be asked, “Hey when is your next book coming out?”
"


That feels awesome. The kind of "interaction" I'm talking about.


message 43: by Renee E (new)

Renee E There are some successful GoodReads authors (like Hugh Howey and Holly Lisle) who are generous with their knowledge of promoting your work as an Indie writer/publisher.


message 44: by Anto (new)

Anto (antod) | 1 comments Wow, such a mix of thoughts over here

I think it all depends of the person, both the reader and the author. They have to decide how much they want to give and how much they want to receive. I don't know if is clear what I want to say.
But as a reader, I like can have a little conversation with an author. Even if it's just to tell that his/her book was great. We are really happy when an author answer us with just a "Thanks"
And we know it's really hard for you get your work published.

And yeah, we maybe can be disappointed when we meet an author, but hey, they are persons, not gods. You can't stop reading their books just for the way they are. It is like judge a book by its cover.
They may be rude, but if they can transport you to another world with their talent, which show in their books, what else does it matters?

I personally love talk to authors, it's feels really nice, and like I said, they're just people. But, once again, it all depends of the person. This is just what I think. I can be wrong or not.


message 45: by Abigail (new)

Abigail Sharpe (abigailsharpe) Antonela, I honestly tried. But it was like patronizing a store with bad customer service.


message 46: by Genta (new)

Genta Sebastian (gentasebastian) | 12 comments I think every author should cherish communications from their readers, and answer their questions in good faith. I also think readers should feel free to respond to the author's body of work, but treat the relationship in the same way a purchaser of a painting would one with the artist.

Asking about inspiration, technique, subject matter, any manner of things pertaining to the author's work is fair and encouraged, but it's crossing a line to ask for personal information, or to presume on a friendship that doesn't exist. One might develop over time, but in the beginning the author knows nothing about the reader, while the reader has already gathered an impression of the author from the books they've written.


message 47: by Christine (new)

Christine Hayton (ccmhayton) | 324 comments Renee wrote: "...if you're talking about the ginormous grabillion generating authors we aren't talking about the same thing..."

You are correct, we're are not talking about the same thing. I am talking about what you described. - I prefer to call them successful.

Any further discussion of this topic does NOT belong here. This is a discussion of "Authors and Readers Relationships" and we are way off topic.

Sorry, Douglas



message 48: by Alexes (new)

Alexes | 122 comments I love hearing from readers. I respond to everyone who contacts me. How close the relationship becomes depends upon the reader. Some have become friends, some acquaintances, and some I never hear from again. It's just like the real world--you meet people you like and who like you, and people who make you think meh and people who meet you and think meh--though they may enjoy your work.

I grew my bangs out because of a reader's comment. :)


message 49: by Melissa (new)

Melissa Veracruz (melissaveracruz) | 96 comments Douglas wrote: "Melissa wrote: "I read... after I published... that Indies need to build their platform before publishing. I'm not sure how else to build that without interacting.

Maybe I'm going about it wrong....."


Yes, I'm working tirelessly to figure out how to build a platform post-publication. :-) I'm reaching out here and there, hoping to connect. But again, reader-writer interaction so far, for me, has been limited, but fun. Especially as it relates to contructivity (my dictionary says that's not a word, let's welcome it into the world...).

I've personally never met one of my fave authors. I've read some of their blogs but am never put off by their attitude, so far. I guess, at a heart, I'd never thought it was necessary until I became an author.


message 50: by Katie (new)

Katie Beitz (KatieBeitz) | 11 comments I don't want my readers to have a relationship with me. I want them to have a relationship with my characters, my story, the world that I create.

Social media has completely distorted the role of author and reader. Part of that is the need to advertise - as an author you are constantly told not to spam, but to build a relationship with people so they will want to read your work. To be honest, I'm not sure what the 'right' thing to do is.


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