World, Writing, Wealth discussion

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World & Current Events > With increase in popularity in audio dramas, do you think audio books will become a thing of the past?

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message 1: by Segilola (new)

Segilola Salami (segilolasalami) | 405 comments The first time I heard about an audiodrama was when an author talked about it on my podcast The Segilola Salami Show.

I was soooooo intrigued by it that I researched the topic. On Reddit, there's even a subreddit just for audiodramas. I posted a comment asking producers and writers of audio dramas to come on my podcast to talk about how audio dramas are different to audio books. This gave me the opportunity to listen to a couple of audio dramas for the first time.

From a personal enjoyment point of view, I feel that audiodramas are considerably better than audio books and if given a choice, I would pick an audiodrama over an audiobook anything. In fact, I am willing to bet that listeners of audiobooks would never want to listen to an audiobook once they listen to their first audio drama.

A regular listener of my podcast left me a comment saying she enjoyed listening to the audiodrama that was played on my podcast and could see herself listening to more audio dramas. You can listen to an episode here https://www.segilolasalami.co.uk/cont...

This got me thinking . . . considering how enjoyable I found audio dramas, do you think audiobooks would still have a place in future? I mean, why listen to one person speak when you can listen to several and have actual sound effects? What are your thoughts?


message 2: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 14969 comments Segilola wrote: "I mean, why listen to one person speak when you can listen to several and have actual sound effects? ..."

Sounds like it's a link between a book and a film. Hope there is enough room for all variations of written, spoken and visual..


message 3: by Segilola (new)

Segilola Salami (segilolasalami) | 405 comments one of the producers I chatted with described audio dramas as similar to stage plays, from the way it is written to the way it is executed. The major difference being you can watch one whilst you only listen to the other


message 4: by Uri (new)

Uri Norwich | 33 comments The American Deluge
I have to disagree with the original question posted for this discussion about Audio books becoming a thing of the past.

Just the opposite, one of my three original novels had been released in 2014. It had been picked up by a producer last September and released as audiobook this month.

The AudioBook version revived sales of previously released Printed and E-books edition. It also brought a new interest to my writing in light of the latest political situation.
For the past year, we have been daily barraged with the headline:
RUSSIAN ELECTION MEDDLING!
My novel had predicted that back in 2014:
"There are no coincidences! There are no twists of fate! And there is nothing that just happens…, without someone orchestrating the outcome!"
Take a look at reviews, please.
Readers are the best proof to my words.
https://www.amazon.com/The-American-D...


message 5: by Segilola (new)

Segilola Salami (segilolasalami) | 405 comments your comment has been a blatant plug for your book rather than answering the question.


message 6: by Marie Silk (last edited Dec 29, 2017 07:31PM) (new)

Marie Silk | 1022 comments Audio dramas have been around for a long time, haven't they? (I'm thinking about War of the Worlds and onward.) I think audio dramas with the music and different actors are very enjoyable. I used to listen to these on the radio. But I think they are probably expensive to produce nowadays, and might cost more to readers. But I honestly don't know for sure how the pricing models and profit margins work. I think a lot of listeners might prefer the drama if it were an option to them, but there will always be listeners who want to get lost in the story using their own imaginations instead of hearing it play out as a drama. A similar analogy might comparing fans of books to fans of films. There will always be fans of one or both, but neither books nor films have gone by the wayside due to one squeezing out the other.

Have you looked into doing an audio drama for your books, Segilola?


message 7: by Segilola (new)

Segilola Salami (segilolasalami) | 405 comments Interesting points you make Marie but for the moment (as far as I am aware) audio dramas are free to consume whereas you have to pay for audiobooks.

I'm not a producer myself but I think audio drama producers produce their content with the aim of monetising it at a later stage. The lack of an entry barrier ensures that interested parties can give their shows a try to see if it is for them.

I haven't even considered audiobooks for my books yet. I hadn't even heard of audio dramas until recently but I don't think it is something I would consider doing anytime soon


message 8: by Ian (new)

Ian Bott (iansbott) | 213 comments Marie Silk wrote: "Audio dramas have been around for a long time, haven't they? (I'm thinking about War of the Worlds and onward.) "

That was my thought too. I seem to recall episodes of LoTR being broadcast on radio back in the 70s, and didn't Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy start off on the radio before it was published as a book?

Are the audio dramas referred to here any different?


message 9: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 5799 comments You're comparing audio dramas to audio books. Are you saying that authors have given permission to have their books made into radio-type plays vs. having someone read the actual books? Is that even being done?


message 10: by Segilola (new)

Segilola Salami (segilolasalami) | 405 comments Scout wrote: "You're comparing audio dramas to audio books. Are you saying that authors have given permission to have their books made into radio-type plays vs. having someone read the actual books? Is that even..."

I never said people are turning someone else's works into audio dramas.

You are welcome to listen to this episode of my podcast to understand audio dramas better https://www.segilolasalami.co.uk/prod...


message 11: by Segilola (new)

Segilola Salami (segilolasalami) | 405 comments Ian wrote: "Marie Silk wrote: "Audio dramas have been around for a long time, haven't they? (I'm thinking about War of the Worlds and onward.) "

That was my thought too. I seem to recall episodes of LoTR bein..."


that's before my time, so I have no idea


message 12: by Ian (new)

Ian Bott (iansbott) | 213 comments OK, I listened to some of the interview and the episode and, yes, it's pretty much the kind of thing I remember listening to in the past. As Colton Flick says in the interview, this is nothing new. It's something that was around before television and people assumed had died off, but it's getting a new lease of life. I guess conditions are right once more for people to be looking for entertainment without having to tie up their visual senses - which is why audio books are popular. Audio drama takes this to the next level and dramatizes rather than simply narrating.

As to whether this will kill off audio books, who knows? My guess is probably not. There's a lot more effort that goes into dramatization so I suspect only relatively few titles will make their way into this format. It's not as intensive as turning a book into a movie, but I think the analogy is valid to some extent.


message 13: by Segilola (new)

Segilola Salami (segilolasalami) | 405 comments ok, that sounds logical. I assumed that as audio dramas have so much more to them, more people would prefer them to simple narration


message 14: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 5799 comments Segilola said: "I never said people are turning someone else's works into audio dramas."

In that case, I don't see them replacing audio books.


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