I Will Fear No Evil I Will Fear No Evil discussion


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message 1: by JoAnn (new)

JoAnn I am rereading this. Having a hard time with this book. Just cannot believe all the sexist things that are written. This book is supposed to take place in the future, but with the way the females are behaving and the way the males treat them it is more like a wet dream from the late 50's early 60's. I mean , Really??? furniture that comes when you call it, cars that you keep in your house yet the women walk around in only body paint?
The little maid outfit that Joan's nurse/maid wants to wear(sounds more like something that a person would wear while role playing in the bedroom).
I will keep on reading this no matter how long it takes as I just have to finish a book when I start it.


Piper Tallis That's pretty much Heinlein. While he understood physics on a level I could not hope to reach, but at heart he was an over-grown adolescent that was very much a product of the times. Even the "heroines" (that I think he believed he was writing as "strong women") have what I call their dippy-do moments. Taking those issues aside, I had other issues with this book. No one ever seems to talk about the ending. To me, it seems clear that the MC insane and has likely been insane since the brain transplant. How else could the sudden appearance of the third character be explained?


Jack JoAnn wrote: "I am rereading this. Having a hard time with this book. Just cannot believe all the sexist things that are written. This book is supposed to take place in the future, but with the way the females a..."

That's just it, you have to read it with the mindset of when it was written. Heinlein was quite ahead of his time with his portrayal of women in SF. Up until the mid-80's, the female character in most SF novels were secondary characters, added as mere fluff and background color / damsel-in-distress types. Heinlein's were always educated, strong-willed, and savvy (comparatively). All of his characters had flaws, even the male ones.

You have to realized that Heinlein was a product of his generation, as was his wife, Virginia. However, Virginia had an engineering degree as well (unusual for someone of the WWII generation) and he would often consult her on the creation of his female characters in order to make them "more real." Many were actually modeled on her, though she was anything BUT "dippy."

Feminists always tend to decry the "Heinlein female", looking for some sort of "superwoman" character and failing to realize that his books featured some of the strongest of females in the entire genre during the 50's and through the 80's. And yes, they would use all their wiles and "assets" to get where they wanted to go and what they wanted to achieve, just like in real life.


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