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What Are You Reading? > What are you reading: October 2017

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message 1: by Ame (new)

Ame (ameb33) | 43 comments Hello! Is it too late to start an October thread? Feel free to bring up what you're reading, or what you're about to read for November!

I'm currently listening to "Her Body and Other Parties" by Carmen Maria Machado thanks to hoopla. It's a short story collection. Here's a description from Gray Wolf Press:
"In Her Body and Other Parties, Carmen Maria Machado blithely demolishes the arbitrary borders between psychological realism and science fiction, comedy and horror, fantasy and fabulism. While her work has earned her comparisons to Karen Russell and Kelly Link, she has a voice that is all her own. In this electric and provocative debut, Machado bends genre to shape startling narratives that map the realities of women’s lives and the violence visited upon their bodies."

I'm only one story into it, but I feel comfortable recommending the title already!


message 2: by Maggie (new)

Maggie (maggieallbee) | 36 comments Maybe it's the proximity to Halloween, but I am itching to read about ghosts (I own a copy of Virginia Ghosts by Marguerite DuPont Lee, which I pick up and put down) or true crime right now. I've been meaning to read The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins. I may even try to find one of Mary Roach's books (Stiff or Spook would be fitting!). I'm craving something spooky or creepy or scary and open to recommendations.


message 3: by Barbie (new)

Barbie | 19 comments I'm using Sherlock Holmes fan fiction (published by proper publishers) as a rest from school stuff. I just finished the audio of A Study in Scarlet Women by Sherry Thomas, and I am about to start The Beekeeper's Apprentice by Laurie King, also on audio.


message 4: by Lindsey (last edited Oct 18, 2017 08:04PM) (new)

Lindsey (lindsbrary) Ame, I'm reading Her Body and Other Parties too! I'm about halfway through and so into it.

I've been reading My Favorite Thing is Monsters before bed & it's excellent. Sweet-hearted, creative loner teen tries to solve the murder of her upstairs neighbor, with lots of nods to classic noir-y detective stuff. It's a graphic novel drawn entirely (and exquisitely) in ballpoint pen, and after listening to an interview with Ferris a few months ago I just had to check it out. May wind up buying a copy too.


message 5: by Tina (new)

Tina Haigler | 1 comments I'm reading The Monk by Matthew Lewis. It's a Gothic classic originally published in 1796 :)


message 6: by Ame (new)

Ame (ameb33) | 43 comments Lindsey wrote: "Ame, I'm reading Her Body and Other Parties too! I'm about halfway through and so into it..."

The Law and Order story is a bit lost on me, but I don't know whether it's because I'm listening to it on audio or because I've never watched Law and Order. I mean I *get* it, but I don't *get* it. Otherwise, the stories are blowing me away.

"My Favorite Thing is Monsters" sounds RIGHT up my alley, so I'm going to get it after I'm done with this Peanuts collection.


message 7: by Ame (new)

Ame (ameb33) | 43 comments Maggie wrote: "Maybe it's the proximity to Halloween, but I am itching to read about ghosts (I own a copy of Virginia Ghosts by Marguerite DuPont Lee, which I pick up and put down) or true crime right now. I've b..."

Might I recommend "Ghostland: An American History in Haunted Places" by Colin Dickey? It's been on my TBR list and to drag Hayley DeRoche into it, she's read it and could give you a good review of the title, but based on your ghost mood and your love of history, I think you'd find it fascinating.


message 8: by Maggie (new)

Maggie (maggieallbee) | 36 comments Ame wrote: "Maggie wrote: "Maybe it's the proximity to Halloween, but I am itching to read about ghosts (I own a copy of Virginia Ghosts by Marguerite DuPont Lee, which I pick up and put down) or true crime ri..."

Sounds perfect!!! Thank you!


message 9: by Lindsey (new)

Lindsey (lindsbrary) Ame wrote: "Lindsey wrote: "Ame, I'm reading Her Body and Other Parties too! I'm about halfway through and so into it..."

The Law and Order story is a bit lost on me, but I don't know whether it's because I'm..."


Ame, I definitely agree that it's a lot harder to make sense of/get invested in without knowledge of the show, & I can see how that one would be a bit rough on audio. I don't get it in the sense that I've never watched an episode of SVU & don't intend to, but I am interested in some of what the story has to say about how we tell & consume stories about violence. Hope the rest of the collection picks back up for you!


message 10: by Ame (new)

Ame (ameb33) | 43 comments Lindsey wrote: "Ame wrote: "Lindsey wrote: "Ame, I'm reading Her Body and Other Parties too! I'm about halfway through and so into it..."

The Law and Order story is a bit lost on me, but I don't know whether it's..."


I did like that she used SVU as a format for narration. That gets major kudos as an experiment, whether I "got" it or not, and it gave me a weird curiosity about trying one of those procedural shows.

The other stories I'm definitely into - the Inventory tale in a post-plague like society, the green ribbon story (you know where it's going, but you devour it anyways). She's masterful at sensually describing everything!


message 11: by Kareemah (new)

Kareemah | 30 comments I've been using the way back machine to start at the beginning of some popular series. Just finished Charles Todd's Test of wills , the first of the Ian Rutledge series, and am now doing the first of Anne Perry's William Monk Series The Face of a stranger.
I am an avowed Britophile and enjoy a lot of fiction based in The Scepter'd Isles.


message 12: by Lisa (new)

Lisa K | 16 comments I am loving Leaving Orbit by Margaret Dean with an eye for a NASA-related book club pick. Strong nonfiction narrative that weaves space program origins and its recent past shutting down the shuttle program with her teaching writing at a university where the students don't quite grasp the gap between the moon landings and the low-orbit shuttles.


message 13: by Ame (new)

Ame (ameb33) | 43 comments Kareemah wrote: "I've been using the way back machine to start at the beginning of some popular series. Just finished Charles Todd's Test of wills , the first of the Ian Rutledge series, and am now doing the first ..."

What about "This Scepter'd Isle" by Mercedes Lackey? Does that count? ;)


message 14: by Maggie (new)

Maggie (maggieallbee) | 36 comments Lisa, that sounds great! Can I share that title w/the rest of the book discussion leaders as a recommendation?


message 15: by Maggie (new)

Maggie (maggieallbee) | 36 comments Kareemah wrote: "I've been using the way back machine to start at the beginning of some popular series. Just finished Charles Todd's Test of wills , the first of the Ian Rutledge series, and am now doing the first ..."

Kareemah -- you've read The House at Riverton by Kate Morton, right? (Fellow Anglophile here!)


message 16: by Kareemah (new)

Kareemah | 30 comments Maggie -- she's in my tbr list of course :)
And - love Lackey, don't remember that title specifically :)


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The Monk (other topics)

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Matthew Gregory Lewis (other topics)