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Under an orange sky (Solar System, #1)
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Under an Orange Sky > 8. Ask the author.

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John Seymour | 1824 comments Mod
8. What questions would you like to ask the author?


Fonch | 1149 comments I have two questions for the author that i will write in two post.
First question why the name of Irene is too important for him?. I would like that the author tell to us his beatiful anecdote.


Fonch | 1149 comments Will he write a third part telling a voyage to Jupiter and Alpha Centauri?. The readers do not know but in the second part "Descent to the hell of Venus" the authos speaks about the posibility to do a travel to Jupiter, to the Jupiter`s moons for being more exact. After the author sent to me a short story about an spaceman, who traveled to Alpha Centauri, and he disappeared without explanation. I would like that the author will write this story, and he could race with "Sparrow" by Mary Doria Russell, and with "Voyage to Alpha Centauri" by Michael D. O`Brien.


message 4: by Tania (last edited Oct 02, 2017 06:47AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Tania (tmartnez) | 105 comments I would like to know what does it mean life in another planet in relation with Christianity for him .


Manuel Alfonseca | 1415 comments Mod
Fonch wrote: "First question why the name of Irene is too important for him?. I would like that the author tell to us his beatiful anecdote."

I wrote this book at the end of 1991 and the beginning of 1992. At that time, the name "Irene" did not mean anything for me, except that I liked it. In 2005, when my first grand-daughter was about to be born, my son and his wife made us vote among the possible names they had chosen for her. One of those names was Irene. Of course, I voted for that, and Irene came to be her name.


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Manuel Alfonseca | 1415 comments Mod
Fonch wrote: "Will he write a third part telling a voyage to Jupiter and Alpha Centauri?. The readers do not know but in the second part "Descent to the hell of Venus" the author speaks about the posibility to d..."

Yes, there is a second part to this book: "Descent into the hell of Venus." If any of you would like to read it, you can download it from here:
epub: http://arantxa.ii.uam.es/~alfonsec/li...
mobi for Kindle: http://arantxa.ii.uam.es/~alfonsec/li...

Or, if someone would rather read them in Spanish, they are here:
epub: http://arantxa.ii.uam.es/~alfonsec/li...
mobi: http://arantxa.ii.uam.es/~alfonsec/li...

Just now I have no plans to write a third part about Jupiter, but you never know what will happen in the future...


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Manuel Alfonseca | 1415 comments Mod
Tania wrote: "I would like to know from the author what does it mean life in another planet in relation with Christianity for him ."

Even though at this time we have no data at all, the question of life in other worlds has been analyzed by some theologians in the Catholic Church.

First: The only problem would be posed by intelligent life in other worlds. The existence of unintelligent life poses no problem.

Second: If there were intelligent life in other worlds, the problem can be stated thus:

a) Are they subject to original sin? C.S.Lewis thinks not; original sin would be an internal question of the Earth. Pierre Teilhard de Chardin thinks yes; original sin would be a common fact affecting the whole universe. Theologians are divided on this question.

b) If they are subject to original sin, do they need a Redemptor, or is Christ's redemption sufficient for them? The consensus of Catholic theologians is that they wouldn't need their own Redemptor, that Christ's redemption here on the Earth is enough for everybody, similarly as it was enough for the inhabitants of the New World before it was discovered and Christianity preached there. This position is opposite to science-fiction stories such as "The man" by Ray Bradbury, where an inter-stellar astronaut arrives to another world just at the time when that world is being redeamed, and finds Christ there.

Please remember that what I think about this does not necessarily coincide with what it appears from my novel (:-) At the end of this discussion I may state what I really think on the matter, but it affects other questions too.


Fonch | 1149 comments Manuel wrote: "Fonch wrote: "First question why the name of Irene is too important for him?. I would like that the author tell to us his beatiful anecdote."

I wrote this book at the end of 1991 and the beginning..."

I want to say this :-).


Fonch | 1149 comments Manuel wrote: "Fonch wrote: "Will he write a third part telling a voyage to Jupiter and Alpha Centauri?. The readers do not know but in the second part "Descent to the hell of Venus" the author speaks about the p..."

And the story of the other Steve travelling around Alpha Centauri. Do not you think to publish a book with all your short stories?.


Manuel Alfonseca | 1415 comments Mod
Fonch wrote: "And the story of the other Steve travelling around Alpha Centauri. Do not you think to publish a book with all your short stories?"

I don't have so many. Perhaps one day...


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John Seymour | 1824 comments Mod
Manuel wrote: "Tania wrote: "I would like to know from the author what does it mean life in another planet in relation with Christianity for him ."

Even though at this time we have no data at all, the question o..."


I cannot remember where I read it, possibly at First Things, but I read an article some time ago that noted that when people were first calculating the likelihood of there being life elsewhere in the universe, that the odds seemed overwhelming in favor of it. The conditions to support the development of life being thought to be few so that there were billions of places in the universe that were thought to offer the possibility. Over time, additional necessary conditions were identified until now it seems miraculous that life exists on Earth. The point of the article wasn't so much that it is unlikely that life exists elsewhere in the universe, but that it is so unlikely that we should exist that our existence alone is an argument for God.


Tania (tmartnez) | 105 comments John, that is exactly the reason for my question. Thank you.


Manuel Alfonseca | 1415 comments Mod
John wrote: "Manuel wrote: "Tania wrote: "I would like to know from the author what does it mean life in another planet in relation with Christianity for him ."
Even though at this time we have no data at all,..."


In fact, I know something about this, for I have written a book on the subject: La Vida En Otros Mundos ("Life in other worlds", but it has not been translated into English, sorry).

Way back in the sixties, the consensus was that there should be many intelligent species in our galaxy, in planets around other stars. Frank Drake (an astronomer) published an equation to estimate their number (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drake_e...). During the seventies, the XVII General Assembly of the International Astronomical Union stated that this number may be anywhere between one (us) and a billion.

About that time, Brandon Carter formulated the anthropic principle, which starts from our existence (which is a fact) and tries to go back to the requirements for that existence. There was a weak anthropic principle that made it clear that the probability of the existence of extra-terrestrial intelligences is much lower than previously thought. And there is a strong anthropic principle which has given rise to the constatation that this universe seems critically designed so that life is possible (the fine tuning problem), a modern-style version of St.Thomas Aquinas fifth argument for God's existence.

You can find more about these matters in the following posts in my blog on popular science:

The eerie silence: http://populscience.blogspot.com.es/2...

The probability of existence of extra-terrestrial intelligence:
http://populscience.blogspot.com.es/2...

The fine tuning problem: http://populscience.blogspot.com.es/2...

Tania, you can find a link to the Spanish versions of these posts at the end of each of them.


Tania (tmartnez) | 105 comments Is there any relevance in the trips per year to launch to Mars, or is just an strategy to control of the terrestrial inhabitants in the planet?
--The number 3340 trips per marcial years--


Manuel Alfonseca | 1415 comments Mod
Tania wrote: "Is there any relevance in the trips per year to launch to Mars, or is just an strategy to control of the terrestrial inhabitants in the planet?
--The number 3340 trips per marcial years--"


Well, the number I chose is somewhat arbitrary (five trips a day on the average), so as to prevent an invasion of Mars by millions of Earth people. In fact, what is being limited is not trips from the Earth to Mars, but air flights inside the Martian atmosphere.


Fonch | 1149 comments Manuel wrote: "Tania wrote: "Is there any relevance in the trips per year to launch to Mars, or is just an strategy to control of the terrestrial inhabitants in the planet?
--The number 3340 trips per marcial ye..."


The people from the earth will have to travel to another world to find a destination. I suppose that it are the intention of the people to travel the moons of Jupiter for solving the problem, because the colonization of Mars it will not be totally perfect.


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