Sir Walter Scott Appreciation discussion

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The Heart of Mid-Lothian > week 4: Chapter 19-25 (end of volume 2

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message 1: by Tracey (new)

Tracey (traceyrb) | 319 comments Mod
I am a little behind with reading having a lot of professional courses to do right now, but please post here thoughts and/or questions and I will catch up soon.


message 2: by Rosemarie (new)

Rosemarie | 270 comments Mod
The book keeps getting better and better. Jeannie is a wonderful character.


message 3: by Tracey (new)

Tracey (traceyrb) | 319 comments Mod
In this week's reading we come to the trial of Effie.
1. Do you think what Jeanie did in court was the correct thing to do?
2. Why do you think Effie will not name the woman who was attending the birth of her baby?


message 4: by Rosemarie (new)

Rosemarie | 270 comments Mod
I think Jeanie did the right thing. Even though it might cost her sister her life, she could not lie. If she had lied, she would have felt guilty in her own eyes of a great sin. She also realized the effect her lying would have on her father.


message 5: by Tracey (new)

Tracey (traceyrb) | 319 comments Mod
I was wearied somewhat by the long passages about the law. Did you feel that Scott included too much that was not needed?


message 6: by Tracey (new)

Tracey (traceyrb) | 319 comments Mod
Rosemarie wrote: "I think Jeanie did the right thing. Even though it might cost her sister her life, she could not lie. If she had lied, she would have felt guilty in her own eyes of a great sin. She also realized t..."

I am very impressed with Jeanie's beliefs. She trusts in her ability to gain answers and direction from Heaven if she will walk before God faithfully to the best of her ability. How many of us could stand such a test as she had in the court room?


message 7: by Rosemarie (new)

Rosemarie | 270 comments Mod
I don't remember the passages as being particularly long, since they didn't slow down my reading.
Compared to digressions by other authors of the 19th century, in particular Jules Verne, they were quite short.


message 8: by Tracey (new)

Tracey (traceyrb) | 319 comments Mod
Rosemarie wrote: "I don't remember the passages as being particularly long, since they didn't slow down my reading.
Compared to digressions by other authors of the 19th century, in particular Jules Verne, they were..."


They didn't slow me down as such, just I was not so sure they were necessary to the story which I have not found in his other works I have read. Maybe just me!


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