The Insecure Writer's Support Group Book Club discussion

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message 1: by Chrys (new)

Chrys Fey (chrysfey) Chapter After Chapter Starter Discussion:

NOTE: You can answer the following questions and discuss them here. You don't have to answer them all, though. Just the ones you want to answer. You can also create a separate topic to post a review or to go more in-depth on a topic related to Chapter After Chapter.

To create a separate topic: Go to the Discussion Board and click “new topic” at the top (it’s in fine print). Choose “April/May Chapter After Chapter” for the folder, create your topic, and then click “post.”


Let’s start!


1. Heather says, “If you’re not good at making time to sit down and write every day, give yourself a month to learn to do just that.”

Question: What is something you could give up for writing time?



2. Heather says, “In order to write a totally great book, a publishable book, you write the training books, the ‘starter’ books. Then you bury the bodies.”

Questions: Do you have book manuscripts “under your bed?”



3. Heather says, “The number one reason books don’t get finished is this: Writers say yes to other things.” She also says, “Most of the book authors I know limit themselves to one ‘extracurricular.’” And, “In order to write a book, you can’t do a lot of other stuff. Things have to be put on hold until you are finished with the book.”

Having a lot of obligations can take up your writing time. I personally have to learn to say NO more often, but I do like to enjoy other activities (gardening, photography), and some stuff can’t be put off.

Questions: 1) Are you a YES person or a NO person? 2) Besides writing, do you enjoy other extracurricular activities? 3) Would you give them up to submerge yourself in a full-time writing life?



4. Heather says, “…you should read one hundred books like the one you are intending to write.” She calls this “The Book 100.”

I’ve read a good many books, but not before I started writing or began a writing project. Instead, I read a lot as I write.

Question: How long would it take you to read 100 books before being able to start writing your book?



5. This one is for everyone who said their insecurity is writing too slow. 😊

Heather says, “Writing is slow. Always have been…Writing books is and should be, really slow.”

Question: Do you speed write or do you write slow?



6. In the section The Burden of Being (Everything for Everyone), Heather says she doesn’t have email at home, or cable, and she doesn’t answer her phone while she’s working on her book.

Question: How often are you distracted by these things? Could you give them up for the sake of your book?



7. In the section Once Up on a Whine, Heather talks about how writer’s whine…we are whiners.

Question: What do you whine about as a writer?



8. In the section Layers of Should, Heather explains that we are making this difficult for ourselves with all of our shoulds.

Question: Are you weighing down yourself and your writing with shoulds? (I should write this. I should write fast. I should publish.)



9. Heather says, “Editing while writing blocks your creativity.”

But for me, this is how I write. It works for me.

Question: Who else here edits while they write?



10. Heather says, “We have to keep going, because without a writing life, who would we be?”

Question: Who would you be without your writing life?


message 2: by C. (new)

C. McKenzie (cleemckenzie) | 12 comments I just read an interesting article about very successful people and how they structure their lives. They shared a lot in common even though they were all quite different. (Darwin, Henri Poincare, Ingmar Bergman) They were passionate about their work and had a terrific ambition to succeed. But what I think speaks to questions 1 and 3 was their capacity to focus. When they worked they worked hard. When they played they played hard. So, it seems that if we can structure our day(s) to include our writing passion along with others, we might be on that same path to success in our writing, but also in our lives.


message 3: by Chrys (new)

Chrys Fey (chrysfey) C. wrote: "I just read an interesting article about very successful people and how they structure their lives. They shared a lot in common even though they were all quite different. (Darwin, Henri Poincare, I..."


"When they worked they worked hard. When they played they played hard." I like that. Wonderful thinking!


message 4: by Juneta, Book Club Moderator (new)

Juneta Key | 73 comments I did not get to read this book because there was no ebook version.
I have a hard time reading paper and hardback because of my eyes, so stick to ebooks because I spend so much time having to read online, my computer/writing, and various stuff.

I enjoyed the interview.

Other things I have read support that, good habit, which scheduling and structuring your day would be a habit are what lead to stronger focus and success. Habit comes down to choice and what is most important to you, so schedule it, even play time.


message 5: by J.L. (new)

J.L. Campbell (jlcampbell) | 2 comments Juneta wrote: "I did not get to read this book because there was no ebook version.
I have a hard time reading paper and hardback because of my eyes, so stick to ebooks because I spend so much time having to rea..."


Juneta, I find that when I schedule things, they become habitual. That has worked for me in that it's how I say regular with writing.


message 6: by Chrys (new)

Chrys Fey (chrysfey) Juneta wrote: "I did not get to read this book because there was no ebook version.
I have a hard time reading paper and hardback because of my eyes, so stick to ebooks because I spend so much time having to rea..."


I know that this book not having an ebook version was a problem for many. I apologize for that, Looking forward, we'll try our best to pick books with ebook versions, but a lot of writing books don't have ebook versions or they are pricey. :(


message 7: by C. (new)

C. McKenzie (cleemckenzie) | 12 comments I used to fight lists, but what I discovered is that if I made one before I did anything--well, not before coffee--at the end of the day I could tick off all or almost all of the items. That list has become my way to focus in this world of distractions. I always include: WRITE.


message 8: by Juneta, Book Club Moderator (new)

Juneta Key | 73 comments Chrys wrote: "Juneta wrote: "I did not get to read this book because there was no ebook version.
I have a hard time reading paper and hardback because of my eyes, so stick to ebooks because I spend so much tim..."


I get that. I learned a lot reading the interviews and what others are saying. No biggie.


message 9: by Juneta, Book Club Moderator (new)

Juneta Key | 73 comments J.L. wrote: "Juneta wrote: "I did not get to read this book because there was no ebook version.
I have a hard time reading paper and hardback because of my eyes, so stick to ebooks because I spend so much tim..."


I learned a lot reading The Power Habit by Charles Duhigg. I started scheduling back in Sept 2016 with MasterKeys course I was taking and it did make a big difference.


message 10: by Juneta, Book Club Moderator (new)

Juneta Key | 73 comments C. wrote: "I used to fight lists, but what I discovered is that if I made one before I did anything--well, not before coffee--at the end of the day I could tick off all or almost all of the items. That list h..."

I like lists too. I especially love it since I found Bullet Journal system. I never stuck with a journal system before but I've been doing this one since the first of the year and love it. I make a lot of lists and do accomplish more. I have learned not to make really long lists that way I check them all off on shorter ones.


message 11: by Rebecca (new)

Rebecca Douglass (rdouglass) | 30 comments I didn't read the book, but the list of questions and comments is interesting in itself.

I was thinking about the "read 100 books" thing. I had done that long before I started writing. My first published book is a children's novel. Yeah, I'd read a lot of those, starting when I was a child. And by the time I started writing mysteries, I'd probably read at least 100. After all, I am writing what I like to read.

That comment may, however, explain why my one effort to write "serious" fiction tanked in 2 chapters. Aside from my at times inconvenient sense of humor, that it!


message 12: by Rebecca (new)

Rebecca Douglass (rdouglass) | 30 comments Also thinking about the question of whether I write fast or slow. The answer is "yes." I can (with a good outline and a strong sense of what I'm doing, and a determination to refuse to do just about everything else) write an 80K-word rough draft in about 6 weeks. But it will take me the better part of a year to edit it into submission. I'm much more worried about what a slow editor I am.


message 13: by Chrys (new)

Chrys Fey (chrysfey) Rebecca wrote: "Also thinking about the question of whether I write fast or slow. The answer is "yes." I can (with a good outline and a strong sense of what I'm doing, and a determination to refuse to do just abou..."

I wish I could write an 80K-word rough draft in 6 weeks! I take longer to write, but I edit faster. Isn't it funny how different every writer is? ;)


message 14: by Tyrean (new)

Tyrean | 13 comments Great questions! I loved the book and I just finished it today. I write slow sometimes and quickly at other times. I don't have a steady speed, but I do have a steady habit of writing something every day. Yesterday, I only wrote 164 words on my novel WIP and I wrote a bit in my journal. The day before that I wrote 458 words. I have had crazy amazing days where I've written 10,000 words in a day, but not lately. Today ... oy, what am I doing? I have written on my WIP yet even though I have written in my journal and I wrote a blog post. Oops. Okay. I'll limit myself to just this comment. One more thought, I actually like reading books that have been quickly written so I'm not sure I have the same tastes as those who like books written slowly and I'm not sure this doesn't affect my own writing habits somehow in an intuitive way. I happen to love The Hobbit more than LOTR and The Hobbit took much less time for Tolkien to write. I also love The Chronicles of Narnia and the whole of the series took only 2.5 years for Lewis to write. What does this mean? Do I have immature tastes? Possibly. I may just like shorter novels.


message 15: by Rebecca (new)

Rebecca Douglass (rdouglass) | 30 comments Chrys wrote: "Rebecca wrote: "Also thinking about the question of whether I write fast or slow. The answer is "yes." I can (with a good outline and a strong sense of what I'm doing, and a determination to refuse...
I wish I could write an 80K-word rough draft in 6 weeks! I take longer to write, but I edit faster. Isn't it funny how different every writer is? ;)

Yes! I just had a chat Monday with a writing buddy, and she was envying me because I'm editing, not composing. Whereas I enjoy that first burst of writing most. That said, I could not write a draft every six weeks. It requires pretty much shutting out everything else--but seems to work well for me. I've done it 3 times now with NaNo, extending on into December, with decent results. Forcing myself to write fast and get a draft out more or less in a single burst helps prevent me forgetting stuff that happened at the beginning before I get to the end. :p

"



message 16: by Bish (new)

Bish Denham | 2 comments Question #4. Because I'm a slow reader it would take me about 2.5 years to read 100 books. At best I average between 40 and 45 books a year. It's taken me over ten years to research my current novel and I haven't read anywhere near 100 books.

Question #5. I write in very productive spurts where I pump out a lot of stuff, so I guess I'm a fast writer. But then when it comes to editing and revising I'm worse than a snail. I may take only few months to write a first draft, but it can take me years to edit and revise. That's where I struggle. I love the thrill of the writing something new, but lose interest when I have to go over it, reread it a "gazillion" times.


message 17: by L.G. (new)

L.G. Keltner (lgkeltner) | 2 comments Question #1-I could cut back on binge watching shows on Netflix.

Question #2-I have four book manuscripts "hidden under the bed" at this point. I definitely learned a lot from writing them, and sometimes I salvage ideas from them and repurpose them for other stories.

Question #5-I can write pretty slow sometimes. Part of that comes from the fact that I tend to edit as I go. I've heard some people say this is a bad way to write, but it works for me.

Question #10-Writing is such a central part of who I am that I can't picture myself without it. I know that when life is busy and I haven't written for awhile, I get grumpy and depressed. Just ask anyone who knows me.


message 18: by Sarah (new)

Sarah Foster (sarah_a_foster) | 3 comments 5. I'm such a slow writer. So, so slow (I've been working on the same book for 6 years). I can have times where the words are just flying onto the page but it's so rare. But I think that's related to...

9. ...the fact that I constantly edit as I go. I won't type out a sentence unless it's perfect in my head already. I'll rewrite something three times before moving on, instead of just letting it be and going back to it later like I know I should. I think I just can't help it, though. If I know a sentence is no good, it's hard to keep going sometimes. But I think in order to keep writing, you just have to accept that right now, it may not be perfect, but you can always go back and fix it. It can always be changed. But you can't change something if you don't write it first.


message 19: by Chrys (new)

Chrys Fey (chrysfey) Tyrean wrote: "Great questions! I loved the book and I just finished it today. I write slow sometimes and quickly at other times. I don't have a steady speed, but I do have a steady habit of writing something eve..."

That's interesting, Tyrean. I never pay attention to (or know for that matter haha) how long it takes the authors to write the books I read. I do tend to like shorter reads, though. :)


message 20: by Chrys (new)

Chrys Fey (chrysfey) L.G. wrote: "Question #1-I could cut back on binge watching shows on Netflix.

Question #2-I have four book manuscripts "hidden under the bed" at this point. I definitely learned a lot from writing them, and so..."


I also edit as I go. I can't help it, and I actually like doing it that way, because when I do have to edit the entire MS, it goes smoother. At least for me. :)

Thanks for answering questions #1 and #2! Binge watching would be something I'd have to cut back on, too.


message 21: by Chrys (new)

Chrys Fey (chrysfey) Sarah wrote: "5. I'm such a slow writer. So, so slow (I've been working on the same book for 6 years). I can have times where the words are just flying onto the page but it's so rare. But I think that's related ..."

I wrote a blog post for the IWSG website for our next IWSG Day (June 7th) that is just for you, Sarah. ;) I offer some tips that can help you with editing as you go, needing each sentence to be perfect. Keep an eye out for it. I hope it helps. :)


message 22: by Juneta, Book Club Moderator (new)

Juneta Key | 73 comments Chrys wrote: "Sarah wrote: "5. I'm such a slow writer. So, so slow (I've been working on the same book for 6 years). I can have times where the words are just flying onto the page but it's so rare. But I think t..."

I'll be watching for it too. Thanks for all you do.


message 23: by Chrys (new)

Chrys Fey (chrysfey) It's my pleasure, Juneta. :)


message 24: by Tyrean (new)

Tyrean | 13 comments Chrys wrote: "It's my pleasure, Juneta. :)"

Thank you for moderating this, Chrys!


message 25: by Chrys (new)

Chrys Fey (chrysfey) Tyrean wrote: "Chrys wrote: "It's my pleasure, Juneta. :)"

Thank you for moderating this, Chrys!"


No problem. And thanks for joining the discussion! Hopefully others will hope in. :)


message 26: by Rebecca (new)

Rebecca Douglass (rdouglass) | 30 comments I was thinking about the need to edit as you go (not something I do, but I have at least one writer friend who does). On the one hand, if that's who you are, it's who you are. And it may make editing easier. But I would think it would make it harder if you find you need to cut something, having put so much into it.

For the "edit as you go" crowd, do you also work from detailed outlines, so that you don't wander off track?


message 27: by Leah (new)

Leah  St.James (leah_st_james) | 9 comments C. wrote: "I used to fight lists, but what I discovered is that if I made one before I did anything--well, not before coffee--at the end of the day I could tick off all or almost all of the items. That list h..."

I fight lists, too! Just recently I've started using one at my day job, just as you described. (I had been relying on pop-up reminders, but I kept falling behind, and they were soooo annoying.) I'm finding it really satisfying to check off the "done" items when I review it each day. It helps bring order to my mostly chaotic environment.

Now I just need to transfer that process to my writing life!


message 28: by Vidya (last edited May 19, 2017 05:47AM) (new)

Vidya Sury (vidyasury) | 1 comments Fantastic questions, and I loved reading the answers.

I work with lists, I often think I'd be nothing without them. And I love to write. Which explains why I have 7 blogs + freelance work.

Question: What is something you could give up for writing time?
I could definitely give up TV, wasting time online for images, and being more focused. Sigh.

Questions: Do you have book manuscripts “under your bed?”
I did. Then lightning struck and I lost all my backup drives along with my computer, and that relieved me of the guilt. I am working on a couple I am really passionate about, though!

Questions: 1) Are you a YES person or a NO person? 2) Besides writing, do you enjoy other extracurricular activities? 3) Would you give them up to submerge yourself in a full-time writing life?
I am practising being a NO person, very hard. Yes to the extra curricular activities. I do have an almost full-time writing life, except it isn't solely pour moi.

Question: How long would it take you to read 100 books before being able to start writing your book?
That sounds so delightful, but if I were realistic, I guess it would take me less than a year. I can't put a book down unless I finish it, which means probably adding the wrong ingredient while cooking. So anything from 2-3 days per book.

Question: Do you speed write or do you write slow?
Definitely speed write

Question: How often are you distracted by these things? Could you give them up for the sake of your book?
I suppose. Except for emergency situations.

Question: What do you whine about as a writer?
Time. Always. Too much to do.

Question: Are you weighing down yourself and your writing with shoulds? (I should write this. I should write fast. I should publish.)
Yes, more so these days, thanks to a growing workload.

Question: Who else here edits while they write?
I do. I've tried not to, but I can't. I am more comfortable editing as I go.

Question: Who would you be without your writing life?
A rock star? Hehe. But I do have a writing life. ❤

So therapeutic answering these questions. I am sure I am going to ponder on each one a little more.

Thank you!


message 29: by Christine (new)

Christine Rains (christinerains) | 14 comments Love these questions! You're awesome, Chrys. And I'm loving reading everyone else's answers.

1. I don't know what I could give up for more writing time. Time with my family? Sleep? If I could do less marketing, I would, but that is a necessity of being a writer these days.

2. I have at least a dozen manuscripts under my bed. One of them is a 200,000 word epic fantasy. I don't think any of them a waste. They are practice, and I still produce stories that are never seen by anyone these days. I agree it's important we're always working to improve our craft.

3. I used to be a YES person, but I've gotten much better at saying NO. I have to or I wouldn't have time to write!

4. My Goodreads challenge goal is to read 100 books in a year. I've met that goal for over five years now. I'd love to do that for the rest of my life.

5. In my opinion (and I'm my own worst boss!), I write at a medium pace. I use sprints to train myself to write faster, but I'm not quite where I want to be.

6. The internet is distracting. I never answer the phone anyway! I could turn off the internet while I'm writing.

7. I whine about lack of time and marketing.

8. Yup, I do that a lot. I should write faster, I should get more stories out there, I should write to market, etc.

9. I've gotten pretty good at turning off the inner editor while I write. Though I don't pass by a word that is misspelled or an awkward sentence.

10. I honestly don't know who I would be without my writing life. I've always been a writer. Maybe an artist of some sort or a pro gamer! Oh! I could write RPGs. Ah, wait, that's a writer too.


message 30: by Juneta, Book Club Moderator (new)

Juneta Key | 73 comments 1. Question: What is something you could give up for writing time?
Finding the time is not my problem so much, but finishing a complete draft, other than a short story is. I pull up my project start to write and then find myself doing other things like world-building, doing more research, filling in more back history on characters or search profiles created for inspiration on what to do next to move the story forward.


2. Questions: Do you have book manuscripts “under your bed?”

I have complete several short stories but so far have not manage to finish w novel or novella size MS all the way through. End up setting it aside and working on another hoping when I go back I can get past the point I stopped at. This may just be fear of several things holding me back.

3. Questions: 1) Are you a YES person or a NO person? 2) Besides writing, do you enjoy other extracurricular activities? 3) Would you give them up to submerge yourself in a full-time writing life?
a) I'm a no person but still not getting it done. b) Not many that I spend a lot of time on besides reading and movies, which is part of the writing process. Don't turn tv on until 8pm at night-rest of time is for writing and the needs that go with it.


4. Question: How long would it take you to read 100 books before being able to start writing your book? I read as I write. Always have and I've put a restriction on when I read so as not to take away from the writing time. I read daily.



5. Question: Do you speed write or do you write slowly? I write slow but I want to have a steady output which I don't have. I need to have more forward advancement with my writing even if slow the same way I have forward advancement with my website which I am always working on. I can see tangible results over time and where I started with it.



6. Question: How often are you distracted by these things? Could you give them up for the sake of your book? I don't turn cable on until 8 pm or not at all if I decide to write during that time too. The email I need to set the best time to deal with and not mess with it all day long. The other social media, not a real problem as don't spend a lot of time with it anyway.




7. Question: What do you whine about as a writer? Not finishing, not knowing what to do, and yet I do but I don't. It is a crazy cycle. Self-doubt a real problem sometimes.



8. Question: Are you weighing down yourself and your writing with shoulds? (I should write this. I should write fast. I should publish.)
I worry about all the things I can't afford to do to make my book good enough once it is done e.g. professional edit, book cover, learning to format, knowing the inside cover stuff to put in, buying isbn numbers etc. If I don't finish I don't have to figute it out, which is CRAZY. I want that option, that place of having to figure it out YET here I am still not finishing.


9. Heather says, “Editing while writing blocks your creativity.”

Question: Who else here edits while they write? When I am trying to figure out what comes next or what to do I reread for getting deeper into it and I sometimes edit or rewrite because it doesn't work that way and fiugre something else out that will let move forward and yet I don't really move forward.



10. Question: Who would you be without your writing life? Alone, isolated and no purpose, trapped physically, financially and mentally. A living death.


message 31: by Chrys (new)

Chrys Fey (chrysfey) Rebecca wrote: "I was thinking about the need to edit as you go (not something I do, but I have at least one writer friend who does). On the one hand, if that's who you are, it's who you are. And it may make editi..."

Yes, I use detailed outlines. But as far as editing as I go, I personally just edit the previous paragraph or two when I get stuck.


message 32: by Chrys (new)

Chrys Fey (chrysfey) Vidya wrote: "Fantastic questions, and I loved reading the answers.

I work with lists, I often think I'd be nothing without them. And I love to write. Which explains why I have 7 blogs + freelance work.

Questi..."


Oh no! If I had lost my work from that lightning, I would've been the opposite of you, Vidya. I would've been devastated.

I like that you're practising being a NO person. I'm trying to do the same.

You must read fast.

And you're a rock star already. ;)


message 33: by Chrys (new)

Chrys Fey (chrysfey) Christine wrote: "Love these questions! You're awesome, Chrys. And I'm loving reading everyone else's answers.

1. I don't know what I could give up for more writing time. Time with my family? Sleep? If I could do l..."


It would be so nice to read 100 books a year, but I find myself fluctuating. 50 books a year seems like a safe goal for me.

I love seeing everyone's answers to these questions. Internet and social media...and TV are my distractions. And I also whine about time and marketing. ;)


message 34: by Chrys (new)

Chrys Fey (chrysfey) Juneta wrote: "1. Question: What is something you could give up for writing time?
Finding the time is not my problem so much, but finishing a complete draft, other than a short story is. I pull up my project sta..."


Your answer to #10. YUP. Same here.


message 35: by Juneta, Book Club Moderator (new)

Juneta Key | 73 comments Chrys wrote: "Juneta wrote: "1. Question: What is something you could give up for writing time?
Finding the time is not my problem so much, but finishing a complete draft, other than a short story is. I pull up..."


So what is your secret to having finished several books? How did you get past it to get that far?

I kind of get I will sort of always do it to some extent, BUT I have no book just a bunch of half done things that need a lot of work still like middles and endings. What do you manage to finish the first time and then repeat it?


message 36: by Chrys (new)

Chrys Fey (chrysfey) Juneta wrote: "Chrys wrote: "Juneta wrote: "1. Question: What is something you could give up for writing time?
Finding the time is not my problem so much, but finishing a complete draft, other than a short story..."




I'm not sure what you're asking when you say " get past it," but I'll try to answer your last question. :) I don't think I have a secret. LOL I guess I'm just determined. I write and I keep writing. I may edit as I go, but I don't let that hold me back. I make sure I'm always moving toward a goal, which is to finish the next chapter. I always know how I want every story to end, so I map out the big events, and then I create simple chapter outlines. But those outlines can change along the way. When I get stuck, I read over the previous page or paragraph and might fix up some sentences, add a bit more details or emotion here and there, but the key is that I don't get carried away. I save the bulk of my revisions for when my manuscript is finished. When I "edit as I go" I'm really tweaking, and using those tiny edits/revisions to get my juices flowing again, because I tend to get little brain farts every once in a while when I write. Those edits, although I'm going backwards a tiny bit, help me to keep going. I guess it takes control and focus.

I hope that helps. :)


message 37: by Juneta, Book Club Moderator (new)

Juneta Key | 73 comments It does. Not sure what I was asking either, but that gave a good answer. That is the reason I do it too. I don't always know the ending tho but some I do. I think it is the middle that overwhelms me. But I will keep writing. Thank you for your thoughtful answer.


message 38: by Rebecca (last edited May 19, 2017 10:09PM) (new)

Rebecca Douglass (rdouglass) | 30 comments Juneta wrote: "It does. Not sure what I was asking either, but that gave a good answer. That is the reason I do it too. I don't always know the ending tho but some I do. I think it is the middle that overwhelms m..."
I'll offer my 2 cents (worth maybe 1.5 cents). I do often kind of lag in the middle of a book, but with an outline, and a strong sense of where I want it to end up (well, that's usually easy with the mysteries), I just go ahead and barf out whatever I think will get me there. I know, lovely metaphor, but it's about right for my rough drafts. Having an outline that tells me, okay, I need a scene here that will convince my sleuth that the butler did it, really helps.

But I think it also takes a certain self-discipline (when there's no one else to offer any, like an editor demanding you produce), to stick to a project until the draft is done, because something new will almost always look like more fun. When those ideas push in, I try to make notes about them, so that I can tell myself I'll make that the next project--and I get start on it all the sooner if I get on with this one. It mostly works, though I've been known to work on outlining and brainstorming one thing while writing the previous. Sometimes you just have to do what you do. But don't allow yourself to start writing book 2 until book 1 is drafted.

Note that I don't suggest that you have to stick with one book all the way to the final product. I in fact alternate and interleave projects--when I finish a rough draft, I put it away and begin editing the previous one. Sometimes I get a little backed up in that area--two books in editing and I start a 3rd. Not good self-discipline there.


message 39: by Juneta, Book Club Moderator (last edited May 20, 2017 09:28AM) (new)

Juneta Key | 73 comments Rebecca wrote: "Juneta wrote: "It does. Not sure what I was asking either, but that gave a good answer. That is the reason I do it too. I don't always know the ending tho but some I do. I think it is the middle th..."

Thanks that is good advice. I think I get frustrated that I don't know or can't figure it out and I start feeling dumb and thinking I am kidding myself that I can write a book. I know that is self-doubt and a lie I tell myself to justify the feeling and setting aside. I have kept plugging so far intermittently. I hope to finish and publish this year. Again thank you for the input.


message 40: by Rebecca (new)

Rebecca Douglass (rdouglass) | 30 comments Juneta wrote: "Rebecca wrote: "Juneta wrote: "It does. Not sure what I was asking either, but that gave a good answer. That is the reason I do it too. I don't always know the ending tho but some I do. I think it ..."

Hang in there! the good news is there is ALWAYS a point (often several) when you think the whole thing is crap and you should just dump it. Ignore the voices! Write on!


message 41: by C. (new)

C. McKenzie (cleemckenzie) | 12 comments Juneta wrote: "C. wrote: "I used to fight lists, but what I discovered is that if I made one before I did anything--well, not before coffee--at the end of the day I could tick off all or almost all of the items. ..."

Short lists are the best. If I over-estimate my capacity, I find I'm dragging items from one date to another. And sometimes I discover I didn't need to do what I'd originally listed at all. My lists have become mini-lessons in priorities and time management.


message 42: by Leah (last edited May 21, 2017 12:32PM) (new)

Leah  St.James (leah_st_james) | 9 comments 9. Heather says, “Editing while writing blocks your creativity.”
...
Question: Who else here edits while they write?


Me! I continually edit. I am a linear thinker (and writer), and if my story feels to me to be going off track, I have to fix it before moving forward.

I have tried the fast draft method. I have valiantly attempted NaNoWriMo about five times now, and I feel such stress at having to conform to someone else's "rule," I end up writing less.

My conclusion: Writing isn't a one-method-fits-all craft. I think it's great that some people can plow through and create a "sloppy" draft, followed by 10 or 15 revision drafts, if not more. It doesn't work for me. I do three drafts, four with a final proofread. That's what works for me.


message 43: by Chrys (new)

Chrys Fey (chrysfey) Leah wrote: "9. Heather says, “Editing while writing blocks your creativity.”
...
Question: Who else here edits while they write?

Me! I continually edit. I am a linear thinker (and writer), and if my story fee..."



Your conclusion, Leah, is spot on. YES! That's how I feel, too. And you're absolutely right that writing isn't a one-method-fits-all craft. All writers are different.


message 44: by Rebecca (new)

Rebecca Douglass (rdouglass) | 30 comments Okay, I'll share my super-special list-making secret: always put something on the list that you've already done. It feels so good to cross it off!


message 45: by Chrys (new)

Chrys Fey (chrysfey) Rebecca wrote: "Okay, I'll share my super-special list-making secret: always put something on the list that you've already done. It feels so good to cross it off!"


I LOVE that! I like to do daily lists, myself. But my list of goals for the year was weighing me down. So I erased it. And within two weeks of erasing that list, I met all three of my big goals for the year. :)


message 46: by J.H. (new)

J.H. Moncrieff No offense, but this is why I rarely read these types of books: "Writing is and should be really, really slow." Says who? I don't mind writers sharing what works for them, but I don't care for the "This works for me so it's now a rule" mentality. Same with the reading 100 books like the kind you're trying to write. I agree that it's a good idea for writers to read a lot and read widely, but many successful writers got that way by writing the books they wanted to read and couldn't find.

That said, I've definitely struggled with balancing writing and anything else, let alone just one extracurricular activity, and I've seen editing during the writing process hold back a lot of writers.

Definitely some value to what she's saying--I just don't like the you "should" do this, especially when she then asks if "shoulds" are holding you back.


message 47: by Susan (new)

Susan Swiderski | 8 comments Well said, J.H. I agree. There are some general tips that can help guide writers toward finding a personal writing path, but "shoulds' and 'musts' don't work for me.

I liked a lot of what Heather said and the way she said it, but I was appalled at her "writing has to be the end-all be-all" attitude. Sure, I love reading and writing, but it is only a PART of who I am and what I do. I will NOT lie to my friends to get out of doing something with them, no matter HOW excited I am about a current scene I'm writing. I will NOT put spending time with my husband, children, grandchildren or friends on the back burner so I can pursue what is arguably my own selfish interest. I'm an old gal, and if I never complete my WIP before I kick the bucket, that would be a shame, but if I complete my books at the expense of the real-life relationships in my life, that would be a tragedy.


message 48: by Rebecca (new)

Rebecca Douglass (rdouglass) | 30 comments Good point about the "shoulds" JH. I have to agree--people have to write how they write. Even "rules" that seem obvious ("write every day") can't be considered hard and fast. Plenty of people with real jobs jam it into days off and vacations, and it works for them better than trying to squeeze out 300 words each night when utterly exhausted.

There's a cliche among my backpacking buddies--"Hike your own hike." "Write your own book" doesn't come out quite right, but I'll agree to do it your own way.

I do like to take a look at books like this from time to time, because I can glean ideas for maybe improving my process. But it always does have to remain MY process.


message 49: by Chrys (new)

Chrys Fey (chrysfey) J.H. wrote: "No offense, but this is why I rarely read these types of books: "Writing is and should be really, really slow." Says who? I don't mind writers sharing what works for them, but I don't care for the ..."


No offense taken at all.

I fully believe that all writers are different. They have their own processes (like how I edit as I go), their own paces, etc. I highlight this in my upcoming post on the IWSG site and ask why writers think they have do what other writers do, such as finish a book in X amount of time. We're not all alike, so we will all write in our own unique ways.

But I will say that when I read the part in the book about writing being slow, for me it was more like Heather was defending the people who write slow, because so many believe they have to write fast, since others do. Which is why in the section "Layers of Should" she includes "I should write fast" as a should that is weighing down writers. So, although she did include a few shoulds in her book, she does explain how shoulds are hurting writers.


message 50: by Chrys (new)

Chrys Fey (chrysfey) Susan wrote: "Well said, J.H. I agree. There are some general tips that can help guide writers toward finding a personal writing path, but "shoulds' and 'musts' don't work for me.

I liked a lot of what Heather ..."




For me, because I'm an introvert and would rather stay home to write, I actually would make up an excuse so I could stay home, where I am happy and comfortable, to do what I enjoy most...writing. As a matter of fact, I have. lol But those instances usually involved my friends trying to get me to go to places where I would feel awkward the entire time. But when I decline, my friends actually get it; they know me. When my family wants to spend time with me, though, I jump on it.

What I took away from Heather's words was more about finding time you can dedicate to writing, focusing and keeping to it no matter what (no distractions), so eventually you will finish your book. I didn't take it as pushing aside loved ones during the entire writing process, which could take years and would be impossible. lol

I have my nephews after school and during the summer some days. If I need to get work done (whether it's editing or writing), I tell them so. They get it (just as all of my loved ones do) because they understand my passion. And they know that when I'm done focusing, which could be an hour or two later, I'm all theirs. :)


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