Q&A with Sharon Kay discussion

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Questions for Sharon Kay

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message 1: by Susan C (last edited Aug 02, 2009 06:45AM) (new)

Susan C (somersetpurplegmailcom) | 9 comments What's the favorite of your own books and why?


message 2: by Susan C (new)

Susan C (somersetpurplegmailcom) | 9 comments How long on average does it take you to research a book?


message 3: by Susan C (new)

Susan C (somersetpurplegmailcom) | 9 comments What is your all time favorite book in general?


message 4: by Sharon (new)

Sharon (sharonk) | 26 comments Mod
Hi everyone,
I am about to leave on the second leg of my book tour for the paperback publication of Devil's Brood. I will be home by the weekend and will be able to respond then. Good questions, by the way!
Have a good week. Sharon


message 5: by Mandy (new)

Mandy Moody | 2 comments I can't wait to read your answers! I'm still trying to think of a "good" question or two of my own!


message 6: by Cathie (new)

Cathie | 5 comments I was at a book store in which you gave a talk several years ago and mentioned that you'd like to do a book on John of Gaunt and his adversary in Wales. Are you still thinking of doing this book? I think its a wonderful idea. Anya Seton is the only one who did a book on him (Katherine) and I'd be interested to have more, especially the Welsh involvement at the time.


message 7: by Sharon (new)

Sharon (sharonk) | 26 comments Mod
Hi, everyone. I got home Friday evening and naturally I found that real life was waiting to ambush me. But now that I've had a chance to catch my breath, I am ready for our Goodreads chat.

First answer is for Susan C. I am not sure if writers should answer a question like this; it is rather like a mother admitting that she loves little Johnny more than Suzie, isn't it? But I do have a favorite book--Here Be Dragons. I'd spent twelve years working on Sunne, which ended very tragically, so it was a great relief to have characters still alive at the end of Dragons! It had all the ingredients a writer could ask for--lots of political intrigue, a powerful (and true) love story, and new terrain to explore, for most people were not that familiar with medieval Wales. And Dragons began my love affair with Wales, which continues to this day.

2nd answer again for Susan. In the past it took me about three years to research and write one of my historical sagas; this is one reason why I enjoyed taking a "break" to do the mysteries, for they could be done in less than a year. I only have a two year window of opportunity to research and write Lionheart, though, and I can already feel Richard's hot breath on the back of my neck!

3rd answer. I am not sure that I can narrow it down to just one book. I think To Kill a Mockingbird is a classic. I loved Lonesome Dove. Other books on my all-time favorite list include The Kite Runner and A Thousand Splendid Suns. Schindler's List, and The Secret Life of Bees. There are many writers I enjoy reading, and I'll mention some of them in a later post. But these are my all-time favorites.

I am going to post this now, and interrupt myself long enough to let my German shepherd out in the yard. But I'll be back soon.
Sharon


message 8: by Sharon (new)

Sharon (sharonk) | 26 comments Mod
Hi, I'm back. This answer is for Jeff. No, I don't think I'll try to cover all of the Plantagenets. I wouldn't want to write about Edward II; his is too sad a story. And I've never been interested in writing about Edward III or Henry V. I have always wanted to write about the Welsh rebel, Owain Glyn Dwr, and that book would also cover the reigns of Richard II and Henry IV. As for William the Conqueror, I have no desire to tell his story, either, although I would like to write about fictional characters, both Saxon and Norman, coming to terms with the tremendous upheaval caused by the Conquest. I don't know that I'll ever get to it, though; such a pity that writers don't have nine lives like cats! Elizabeth Chadwick has written an excellent novel covering that time period called The Conquest, interweaving fictional characters with real historical figures; she also has a very vivid description of the battle of Hastings.

Hi, Cathy. Yes, I'd considered doing a novel about John of Gaunt at one time. I finally decided, though, that it wouldn't work for me. I don't think his life is well suited for a fictional treatment, at least by me. But he is undeniably an interessting man and I think he'll make a fine secondary character in my novel about Owain Glyn Dwr.
Sharon


message 9: by Cathie (last edited Aug 10, 2009 08:40AM) (new)

Cathie | 5 comments Sharon:

Elizabeth Chadwick also covered William the Conqueror in her novel The Winter Mantel, an excellent read about Waltheof Siwardsson, Earl of Huntingdon, to whom King William married his niece Judith.

I could not remember the Welsh hero you mentioned in your discussion, Owain Glyn Dwr. Mea culpa. I do hope with all my heart that you do get to write that story. John of Gaunt was indeed an interesting man. A prince who made kings but never became one.


message 10: by Susan (new)

Susan (boswellbaxter) Sharon, are there characters you'd write about differently now if you were writing any of your novels over again?


message 11: by Sharon (new)

Sharon (sharonk) | 26 comments Mod
Hi, Cathie,
I am a great fan of Elizabeth Chadwick's books, so I will add that one to my To Read list. I recently read her The Falcons of Montabard and raved about it on my blog; her major male character was an illegitimate son of the Earl of Huntingdon, who was probably the son of the earl you mention in The Winter Mantel.
There are three great Welsh heroes, Llywelyn Fawr, his grandson Llywelyn ap Gruffydd, and Owain Glyn Dwr, and I have wanted to write about Owain for years.
And yes, John of Gaunt deserves credit for remaining loyal to his young nephew, Richard II, and never attempting to seize the throne for himself.
Sharon


message 12: by Susan C (last edited Aug 10, 2009 01:39PM) (new)

Susan C (somersetpurplegmailcom) | 9 comments Sharon, I have all your books except the mysteries. I only recentely puchased them because I want to learn European history from the 1100's on. I chose your books because of the glowing reviews you have had on Goodreads and I'm excited to get to them shortly. I'm reading Plaidy's book on Eleanor of Aquitaine and then I'll move into the next group of years.

I also loved all book the books you mentioned, except I haven't read the Secret Life of Bees.

What genre of books do you read just for sheer pleasure and escapism?


message 13: by Nona (new)

Nona (goodreadscomnona) Hello Sharon I just want to say thank you again for wonderful books, my husband watched me cry and laugh then get angry reading the Welsh triology and now I'm a very proud wife since he is getting ready to start reading them himself. I cannot wait to read Time and Chance, When Christ and His Saints Slept and the Devils Brood which will be this fall. I'm waiting so I can sip cocoa under a warm blanket and get lost in the books. Thank you again.

Nona


message 14: by Mandy (new)

Mandy Moody | 2 comments LOL, Nona!
My husband watched me read the HBD series and talk incessantly about them, too.
When I finished the trilogy, he also read it. Loved it, of course! I'm sure your husband will, too!

Sharon,
Have you considered writing about any of the Tudors? I know they've been done by just about everyone...
I'd LOVE to read your take on Henry VIII and his wives, though!
I love the way you tell your stories. The way you bring your characters to life really sticks with me.

I also wanted to mention that I rented Lion in Winter on your recomendation (I also read your blog) and LOVED it - thanks for that!


message 15: by Susan C (new)

Susan C (somersetpurplegmailcom) | 9 comments Mandy wrote: "LOL, Nona!
My husband watched me read the HBD series and talk incessantly about them, too.
When I finished the trilogy, he also read it. Loved it, of course! I'm sure your husband will, too!

Sharo..."


How do you get to Sharon's blog?


message 16: by Misfit (new)

Misfit | 4 comments Susan C wrote: "Mandy wrote: "LOL, Nona!
My husband watched me read the HBD series and talk incessantly about them, too.
When I finished the trilogy, he also read it. Loved it, of course! I'm sure your husband w..."


http://sharonkaypenman.com/blog/

I don't know if you follow any blogs Susan but I like Google reader, it's very easy to paste any URL in you want to follow. I also track a few Amazon reviewers that way (by new reviews). I like to see what they're reading.


message 17: by Susan C (new)

Susan C (somersetpurplegmailcom) | 9 comments Thanks!


message 18: by Susan C (new)

Susan C (somersetpurplegmailcom) | 9 comments I just read some of her last posts and was very excited to hear that Margaret George's next book is going to be on Elizabeth I. Yeah!!!!


message 19: by Sharon (new)

Sharon (sharonk) | 26 comments Mod
Susan wrote: "Sharon, are there characters you'd write about differently now if you were writing any of your novels over again?"
Hi, Susan,
An interesting question, Susan. In fact, I had a similar one on Librarythings.com, where I've also been doing a chat. I might conceivably write Richard Coeur de Lion differently in Dragons; that was written more than 20 years ago and my views of Richard have altered over those years, esp. once I began to do some heavy-duty research on the Angevins. For example, when I wrote Dragons,I saw Richard as this unfilial, ungrateful son, whereas he had some very legitimate grievances against Henry and it would not be difficult to defend him if I'd been his lawyer. But on the other hand, we see Richard only through John's eyes in two brief scenes, if my memory serves, and so naturally John's view is a biased one. I am going to have the same problem in Lionheart with Conrad of Montferrat; he will be a secondary character and readers will see him mainly through Richard's eyes, and since he and Richard were not friendly, he won't show to best advantage. He'll have to wait till I do my novel about the real Balian of Ibelin (not Orlando Bloom's Balian in Kingdom of Heaven) to appear in a more positive light. I remember that when Roberta Gellis wrote a novel about Henry Tudor and Edward IV's daughter Bess, she explained in an AN that the hostile views expressed of Richard in the novel were not her own, but were those of the Tudors. So writers do come up against this, esp. when you're dealing with secondary characters.
I probably would change the references in Dragons to Richard's sexuality, though. When I wrote Dragons, the prevailing view was that Richard was gay. Today no historian would say that for a certainty, and it is very much open to question. What I can say is that if Richard did share his bed with men, it was either infrequently or he was remarkably discreet about it, for there is not the slightest hint in contemporary chronicles that he preferred men to women or that his sexual appetites were anything other than "conventional", to quote his premier biographer. This is in stark contrast to what was written about William Rufus in his lifetime and also about Edward II. So I would most likely delete the casual castle gossip about Richard's sexual habits in that early scene at Chinon.
And I'd have to rewrite John's relationship with his illegitimate half-brother in Dragons. At the time I wrote it, we did not know when William Longsword had been born. We now know the identity of his mother and that he was probably born in the later 1170's. So my Will in Dragons was about 20 years older than he should have been, and while he and John did indeed have a close relationship, its dynamics would have changed considerably if he was 10 years younger than John instead of 10 years older.
Sharon


message 20: by Suzanne (new)

Suzanne (chatternyc) | 7 comments Hi Sharon,
Am greatly looking forward to the next book in the Angevin series; one of the books that turned me into a HF reader eons ago was by Ronald Welch about that crusade. I'm especially looking forward to see someone shed light on some of the lesser-known figures of the period, from poor Berengaria to the Sicilian Normans and even Saladin and the barons of Outremer. (I even extended a trip to Jordan into Syria in order to visit Krak des Chevaliers...)

A couple of questions, when you have the chance...

What do you think of Martha Rofheart's book about Glyn Dwr?
Are there periods of history that you prefer writing about -- you've covered roughly 1140 to 1485, by now? Similarly, are there periods that you don't find interesting, or to which you feel too much or too little attention has been given by other HF authors? (Personally, I'm past the point of no return on Anne Boleyn, even though Jean Plaidy & Margaret Campbell Barnes were 'threshold drugs' in my own HF addiction...)
Finally, what HF writers do feel influenced you most over the years -- first as a reader, and more recently as a writer? What or who introduced you to HF?

Thanks for taking the time to do the Q&A!



message 21: by Sharon (new)

Sharon (sharonk) | 26 comments Mod
Hi, Susan. For pure pleasure, I love mysteries. Obviously I like medieval mysteries, am a huge fan of Margaret Frazer's two series set in 15th century England. I also really like Priscilla Royal's series set in 13th century England and Sharan Newman's series set in 12th century France. One of my all-time favorite authors is Dana Stabenow, whose Kate Shugak series set in Alaska today is downright brilliant. I also like Steven Saylor's Rome series, and the one written by John Maddox Roberts. I used to love Janet Evanovich's Stephanie Plum series, but sadly, I was disappointed in the last few books. It is a delicate balancing act to keep a series fresh, and this is why so many mystery writers have more than one series and rotate to keep them from getting stale. I can highly recommend Roberta Gellis's Madelaine la Batard series, set in 12th century England, even though there are only four books and I am not sure if she plans to continue it. I can't forget Robert Crais's Elvis Cole and Joe Pike series, either. And lately I've been reading Charlaine Harris Sothern Vampire series. I like the books much better than the HBO series, which is very gory, and I love Charlaine's gallows humor. I'm sure I've forgotten some of my favorite authors, but I'm about to head out for a doctor's appt now, and I'll log on again once I get back.
Sharon


message 22: by Sharon (new)

Sharon (sharonk) | 26 comments Mod
Nona, I'm so glad you convinced your husband to give my Welsh trilogy a try. I am very happy to say that a large portion of my readers are men, although my publishers tell me that most readers of historical fiction are women. Anyway, I hope he likes them. And yes, getting lost in a book is a delight, isn't it?
Sharon


message 23: by Sharon (new)

Sharon (sharonk) | 26 comments Mod
No, Mandy, I have no desire to write about the Tudors. First of all, that ground has been ploughed over and over again, so it would be hard to say anything that hasn't been said already. And then there is another hurdle to overcome--that I don't like the Tudors much! Well, at least the male Tudors. I do find Elizabeth to be fascinating, in her own unique way, and I think Mary was a tragic figure. And I have no desire to be haunted by irate Ricardian ghosts, either. My favorite novel about Elizabeth is Legacy by Susan Kay. It was long out of print, but I'm happy to spread the word that Sourcebooks will be publishing it this coming spring.
Sharon
PS I'm glad you liked Lion in Winter. As I have explained in my blog and during my book tour, it is not historically accurate, having come out 40 years ago. But it remains great fun, with compelling performances and razor-sharp dialogue and lots of gallows-humor.


message 24: by Sharon (new)

Sharon (sharonk) | 26 comments Mod
Susan, you can reach my blog by going to my website, www.sharonkaypenman.com. At the top of the page, the various features are listed, and one of them is Sharon's Blog. I have recently added a new feature to the website, listing some of my favorite blogs written by other writers. Just click onto Author, and you'll find my List of Favorites and my medieval mishaps, etc, and a list for author blogs.
Sharon


message 25: by Sharon (new)

Sharon (sharonk) | 26 comments Mod
Susan C wrote: "I just read some of her last posts and was very excited to hear that Margaret George's next book is going to be on Elizabeth I. Yeah!!!!"

Okay, the Reply feature is now working! It was balking earlier. I talked to Margaret at the HNS convention in June and she says her novel with begin with the Armada. Margaret and Elizabeth--a good combination.
Sharon


message 26: by Sharon (new)

Sharon (sharonk) | 26 comments Mod
Suzanne wrote: "Hi Sharon,
Am greatly looking forward to the next book in the Angevin series; one of the books that turned me into a HF reader eons ago was by Ronald Welch about that crusade. I'm especially lookin..."


Hi, Suzanne. I have not read Martha Rofheart's book; is it a novel or non-fiction? Actually, I feel most comfortable now in the 12th century, am very happy that I'll be able to stay there for the next two books after Lionheart, one about a woman almost as remarkable as Eleanor, Constance de Hauteville, the last Norman Queen of Sicly, and one about the real Balian of Ibelin, not Orlando Bloom's Balian in Kingdom of Heaven. Then I hope to move on to the late 14th century with Owain Glyn Dwr. As I said in an earlier post tonight, I think the Tudors have been written about so often that there isn't much left to say. And while there is no medieval era that I don't find interesting, the same can't be said for certain English kings; I have never felt the urge to write about Edward II, Edward III, or Henry V.
I don't think my writing has been influenced by any other writers. I have tried to avoid that as much as possible, not wanting to be influenced, even subconsciously, by how other writers portray the historical figures I write about. This is one reason why I've deliberately chosen not to read novels about Richard III or Henry and Eleanor, etc. As a reader, I can't credit any one writer with sparking an interest in historical fiction. I can't remember a time when I didn't enjoy reading of bygone times and other cultures. One of the earliest historical novelists I remember reading was Anya Seton, though.
Sharon



message 27: by Susan C (new)

Susan C (somersetpurplegmailcom) | 9 comments Thanks for taking the time to answer our questions!


message 28: by Suzanne (new)

Suzanne (chatternyc) | 7 comments Sharon -- excellent!!! If anything, I am even more excited about those two future books than the conclusion to the Angevin series!!! I will greatly look forward to reading about Constance, in particular. I finally found an affordable copy of John Julius Norwich's massive tome about the Normans in Sicily last year, and that has whetted my appetite for the time & region. It will also be great to have more HF that isn't focused just on England pre-1600!
Martha Rofheart wrote several novels set in time periods that you have tackled, including one so-so book about Richard I. One of her better ones is the Alexandrian, and one I like was about Sappho (now there's an overlooked figure in history...) but the books I'm thinking of are "Cry God for Glendower" and "Cry God for Harry", about Owain Glyn Dwr and Henry V, respectively. (I think there was a kind of plagiarism scandal involving the latter that some other folks on this board might remember more clearly than I do.) The former is fascinating and introduced me to this generation of Welsh freedom fighters. (A digression -- on a bank holiday while living in London, some colleagues and I went hiking in Snowdownia; they were bemused by the fact that one of the highlights for me was the chance to clamber over what is left of Dolwyddelan Castle...)
Final quick question -- how do you manage so many different principle characters and multiple points of view when writing & organizing your material? How do you decide, for instance, how to convey to the reader the news of a particular event -- through a character's eyes, or by having other characters discuss it, or through your own voice as author?


message 29: by Sharon (new)

Sharon (sharonk) | 26 comments Mod
Hi, Suzanne. Thanks for giving us this information about Martha Rofheart's books. They do sound interesting. As for your question, I wish I had a definite answer. But mainly it is instinct. I usually have no trouble deciding which scenes must be dramatized; the problem comes when I have to limit them. And once I become comfortable in a character's skin, I have no trouble seeing the world through his or her eyes. I found it a bit disconcerting that I felt so much at home in George of Clarence's skin! People naturally try to justify their actions, no matter how evil, so I take that into account, too. Very few of us would be willing or able to see ourselves as evil. In Devil's Brood, it was very easy to see things from Henry's perspective at the same time that I was able to see things from the perspectives of Eleanor or their sons. That was a story without villains, though, just very human people making some monumental mistakes.
Sharon


message 30: by Brian (new)

Brian (brianwainwright) | 2 comments Having read the Rofheart books on Henry V and Owain Glyndwr, I should say, to put it politely, that the former is heavily influenced by _Monmouth Harry_ by A.M.Maughan and the latter by _Owen Glendower_ by John Cowper Powys.

Sharon, as I have already told you in another place, I for one am really looking forward to your Glyndwr book as I know you will do him justice. To turn that into something like a question, how do you deal with the myth where it intrudes into history? There is certain a fair bit of myth around Owain.


message 31: by Suzanne (new)

Suzanne (chatternyc) | 7 comments Brian, tks for clarifying that... I recalled some kind of issue involving one of the books, but hadn't realized it was both. At the age I read them, I would never have read either of the other two (Cowper Powys at age 11? probably not...) so they are still stuck in my head as my intro to Glyn Dwr and giving me insight beyond the Henry IV plays by you know who into Harry V pre-Agincourt.
Sharon, do you have an ETA for the final Angevin book -- next year? *she inquired, hopefully*


message 32: by Sharon (new)

Sharon (sharonk) | 26 comments Mod
Brian wrote: "Having read the Rofheart books on Henry V and Owain Glyndwr, I should say, to put it politely, that the former is heavily influenced by _Monmouth Harry_ by A.M.Maughan and the latter by _Owen Glend..."

You're absolutely right about that, Brian. I am facing the same challenges now with Richard Coeur de Lion. In Richard's case, he deliberately fostered the myths, having a real flair for medieval PR. I suspect Owain did, too, to some degree. I'm looking forward to plunging into his past, seeing if I can separate fact from fiction. It will be wonderful, too, to be back in Wales!
Sharon


message 33: by Sharon (new)

Sharon (sharonk) | 26 comments Mod
Suzanne wrote: "Brian, tks for clarifying that... I recalled some kind of issue involving one of the books, but hadn't realized it was both. At the age I read them, I would never have read either of the other two ..."

Hi, Suzanne. The deadline for delivery of Lionheart is August of 2010, but I don't think I'll be able to meet it. I do have a bonda fide excuse, though--I lost several months last year when I was ill, too sick to do much researching or writing. If I can keep reasonably close to the deadlne, Putnam's will publish it in 2011.


message 34: by Susan C (new)

Susan C (somersetpurplegmailcom) | 9 comments Sorry to hear about your illness, glad you're back in good health. It must have been hard not to research and write when it's your passion.


message 35: by Pat (new)

Pat | 3 comments Sharon, Do you ever plan to be in the Washington State area....Seattle or Spokane?


message 36: by Sharon (new)

Sharon (sharonk) | 26 comments Mod
Pat wrote: "Sharon, Do you ever plan to be in the Washington State area....Seattle or Spokane?"

Hi,Pat. I've been in Seattle several times for book tours in the past; also Portland. But never Spokane. Sadly, publishers seem to send writers out on regional tours now, not so much the coast-to-coast tours of the past, and in many cases, they've eliminated tours altogether. I'd be sorry to see that became the norm, for I think there is much to be said for book tours.
Sharon


message 37: by Sharon (new)

Sharon (sharonk) | 26 comments Mod
Susan C wrote: "Sorry to hear about your illness, glad you're back in good health. It must have been hard not to research and write when it's your passion."

Hi, Susan. It was very frustrating. I was just so thankful, though that I'd already finished Devil's Brood, which had been long delayed by illness, my dad's Alzheimer's and my own chronic mononucleosis.
Sharon
PS Richard Lionheart apparently suffered from chronic malaria; these episodes are often mentioned by the chroniclers. When he became seriously ill at the siege of Acre (not malaria then, a mystery malady) he almost died, but as soon as he was on the mend, he insisted upon being taken to the siege site on a litter and he kept busy by shooting his crossbow at the enemies on the city walls.


message 38: by Laura (new)

Laura Thank you for writing all of your wonderful books. Here Be Dragons was the first one that I read and remains one of my all-time favorite books. I'm looking forward to seeing your portrayal of Richard in your next book.

Have you given any thought to what/who you will write about after Richard? Also, what is it about a character or era that makes you want to do all of the research and writing that goes into a book?

Thanks.


message 39: by Suzanne (new)

Suzanne (chatternyc) | 7 comments Sharon, it's too bad that recreational crossbow usage is probably illegal these days as therapy! I could see it might alleviate the frustrations of being laid up and unable to do what you most want to (whether it's thrash Saladin or finish the book...)
Hope you are feeling better now, and eagerly awaiting the next chapter in the opus.
BTW, do you have any input into whether your books are available on Kindle? Some of them are (and I've downloaded them...) but not When Christ & His Saints... and not a couple of the others. It would be nice to have a complete Kindle set, as well... *she said wistfully*


message 40: by Sharon (new)

Sharon (sharonk) | 26 comments Mod
Laura wrote: "Thank you for writing all of your wonderful books. Here Be Dragons was the first one that I read and remains one of my all-time favorite books. I'm looking forward to seeing your portrayal of Ric..."

Hi, Laura.
I am sorry I didn't get back to you sooner, but I've been in Sicily with Lionheart, getting his fleet ready to sail, and then they ran into a horrendous storm that scattered their fleet. To sail in a medieval gally took enormous courage or maybe a touch of madness!
I have three books in mind after Lionheart. I want to write about Constance de Hauteville, the last Norman Queen of Sicily, a remarkable woman who reminds me of Eleanor of Aquitaine in some ways. And I'd like to write about the real Balian of Ibelin, not Orlando Bloom's totally fictional Balian in Kingdom of Heaven. Then I am finally going to write about the last of the medieval Welsh heroes, Owain Glyn Dwr. After that, who knows? Assuming, of course, that I am not too feeble by then to use a computer. Any suggestions?
I love the 12th century, so that probably influenced my desire to write about Constance and Balian. Sometimes a character just "speaks" to me and as soon as I begin to learn of the history, I know I want to write about this person. Sometimes it works the other way. For years, I'd thought about writing of John of Gaunt. But when I began to give it serious consideration, I realized I lacked the enthusiasm for dedicating a book to him. I am not sure that his long, complicated life lends itself well to fiction. And how could I improve upon Anya Seton's cult classic, Katherine? I think he'd make a good secondary character and so he'll play a role in Owain's story. But as soon as I decided not to devote a book to him alone, I knew it was the right decision.
Sharon


message 41: by Sharon (new)

Sharon (sharonk) | 26 comments Mod
Suzanne wrote: "Sharon, it's too bad that recreational crossbow usage is probably illegal these days as therapy! I could see it might alleviate the frustrations of being laid up and unable to do what you most want..."

Hi, Suzanne.
Recreational crossbow usage? Sounds sort of intriguing, doesn't it? When a character started to give me a hard time, I could just reach for the crossbow. That was part of the fun of writing my medieval mysteries--I got to play God with my characters and could threaten to make them murder victims if they didn't start cooperating.
Sadly, I do not have the final say about Kindle. I've received quite a few queries from people wanting to know when the first two books of Henry and Eleanor's trilogy would be available on Kindle. I'd pursued this with Putnam's and am happy to report that Time and Chance will be available in Kindle format by September. The situation is much murkier with Saints. We have contacted Holt, which owns the electric rights, and are waiting for them to get back to us. As soon as I have something definite to report, I will mention it on my blog. And I'll also post here, too, if I can. Is there a way to post comment on Goodreads when not doing an author chat like this one?
Sharon


message 42: by Suzanne (new)

Suzanne (chatternyc) | 7 comments Hmmm, not up on the specifics. I think you could just start a new thread or comment in a couple of the groups. Misfit or someone could also spread the word very readily, I suspect. Am delighted to hear about Time & Chance and will look for it, and keep my fingers crossed re Saints...


message 43: by Misfit (new)

Misfit | 4 comments I think there are several groups who would be interested in knowing when kindle formats are available. The European Royalty and All Things Medieval being two. Shall I send you invites Sharon?

As for your blog, when you post the GR memeber who follow you see that blog post in their update feeds when they pull up the main page.


message 44: by Sharon (new)

Sharon (sharonk) | 26 comments Mod
Hi, Misfit. Yes, please do send the invitations.
Confession time now. I haven't a clue what your last sentence means! It is as if you'd suddenly lapsed into a foreign language, and a really foreign language like Vulcan or Klingon.
Sharon


message 45: by Misfit (new)

Misfit | 4 comments Hi Sharon, I'll send off invites shortly. Nona and Sarah would be thrilled to see you joining their groups :)

When I open up the main Goodreads page I get feeds from friends and their latest activity, i.e. books rated, books listed, comments in groups, etc. On the same page I get notice of new blog posts from authors I follow. Anytime, you EC or Susan H post something on your blog it shows up on that feed page. Not sure how it works, it just started happening.


message 46: by Cathie (new)

Cathie | 5 comments EC and Susan H are one and the same person.


message 47: by Susan (new)

Susan (boswellbaxter) Cathie wrote: "EC and Susan H are one and the same person."

That's not what my mama tells me!

Susan H.



message 48: by Susan (new)

Susan (boswellbaxter) Sharon, other than books you read for research, what nonfiction do you enjoy?


message 49: by Misfit (new)

Misfit | 4 comments Cathie wrote: "EC and Susan H are one and the same person."

EC is Elizabeth Chadwick. Susan H is Susan Higganbotham.




message 50: by Cathie (new)

Cathie | 5 comments Oh. Sorry, Misfit. I thought you meant Elizabeth Chadwick and Susan Hicks. They are one and the same person.


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