Mathematics Book Club discussion

Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions
This topic is about Flatland
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Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions

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message 1: by Mars, Founder Moderator (new) - rated it 4 stars

Mars Smith | 33 comments Mod
This book is rather short. I found the audio version for this book, by the way.

YouTube Link: https://youtu.be/XSGLyLrixMs


message 2: by Jim (new)

Jim  Libby | 5 comments Another option is a book called "The Annotated Flatland" by Ian Stewart. I noticed I had it, but never read it. Not all of his notes are of interest, but some are, so you can pick and chose which notes you read.


message 3: by Mars, Founder Moderator (new) - rated it 4 stars

Mars Smith | 33 comments Mod
Oh, wow. That's cool. I didn't know there was an annotated version. I might check it out. Thanks for sharing, Jim.


message 4: by Mars, Founder Moderator (new) - rated it 4 stars

Mars Smith | 33 comments Mod
Here is my review of the book. I hope it is helpful for those who have not read this book.

Tip: *Read the illustrated version. The text refers to the pictures as means of explaining the overall story. If you read the text only version, you will be robbed of the full experience of this wonderful book.

Prior to Reading: This book is fantastic if you understand that it is a satire of Victorian England's class system. It is also important to understand that this book is a metaphor for higher dimensions which is an extremely important topic in both physics and mathematics.

Pro: The book,"Flatland", does a terrific job explaining how difficult it is for people to comprehend higher dimensions as most of us have no real concept of dimensions higher than our own. This is a great book for people who want to read something quickly and understand more about both lower and higher dimensions.

Con: If you don't know anything about different dimensions, this book may seem like utter nonsense. If you don't know anything about Victorian England's class system, then, you will not catch and enjoy all of the indirect references to it


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