World, Writing, Wealth discussion

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The Lounge: Chat. Relax. Unwind. > People turning robots

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message 1: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 13781 comments Discussing the possibility of robots substituting humans in the future, we already have robot-like humans doing monotonous , routine tasks, lacking any emotional engagement -:)
It can be a tiler from China, who has fantastic output usually much higher than that of others, working without coffee and cigarette breaks or an overworked hospital personnel performing protocols on auto-pilot, ignoring and vaccinated against drama and pain around them or assemblers in some remote factory...

So maybe it's natural to let robots perform robot-like tasks? The question whether people freed from such activity can switch to something creative or intellectual afterwards...


message 2: by Bernard (new)

Bernard Boley (bernard_boley) | 126 comments Nik : The question whether people freed from such activity can switch to something creative or intellectual afterwards...

Interesting question. It would probably depend on the creative skills one has and his need/wish to test them in new domains. Many think some of their skils can only serve when they work and only use the others elsewhere.


message 3: by Graeme (new)

Graeme Rodaughan REF: BBC: http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-38808925

All this technology needs to be is cheaper than $15-$20 USD an hour and it's cost competitive with unskilled human labor in the west.

This evolution of technology is unstoppable - the question is - how will people respond when they lose their jobs?


message 5: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 13781 comments Reminds me now Karpov or Kasparov against the computer chess tournament -:)

Wonder when we'll see First machine written novel -:)


message 6: by Mehreen (new)

Mehreen Ahmed (mehreen2) | 1911 comments Nik wrote: "Reminds me now Karpov or Kasparov against the computer chess tournament -:)

Wonder when we'll see First machine written novel -:)"


Wonder what will happen to human brain then.


message 7: by Justin (new)

Justin (justinbienvenue) I'm just gonna say this..yes iRobot was a bad movie but I think they were onto something...


message 8: by Philip (new)

Philip (phenweb) The social implications of automation have been with us since the dawn of the industrial age. Robots are just a further step along the route. The problem will be human unemployment within a growing populations and poor wealth distribution.

The main manufacturing base shifted to china and elsewhere on the understanding of cheap labour thus creating a continuous boom in China. Some of that has moved to India and Bangladesh the the search for ever cheaper labour. Now comes the robot who will work 24/7 with no pay just maintenance by a few. What will the 7 billion on the planet do then. We cannot all be writers poets i.e. creatives. Look at a modern news room no camera operators they are all remote. The cameras on automatic controlled by one or two producers.

Music sampling is already automating music production. So a computer written book - probably already happened


message 9: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 13781 comments Philip wrote: "The main manufacturing base shifted to china and elsewhere on the understanding of cheap labour thus creating a continuous boom in China. Some of that has moved to India and Bangladesh the the search for ever cheaper labour...."

In 50 years, when rich and sate Chinese, Indians and Bangladeshians will be looking for cheap labor where to outsource all the production to, Western nations might be sufficiently impoverished to host back the manufacturing facilities for peanuts..


message 10: by Graeme (new)

Graeme Rodaughan some new video from Robot designer Boston Dynamics.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-7xvq...


message 11: by Matthew (last edited Feb 27, 2017 10:34PM) (new)

Matthew Williams (houseofwilliams) Hang on here. How is that we are a dozen comments into this thread and no one has mentioned Hiroshi Ishiguro and his lovely Geminoids? I swear, someday robotic replacements will be possible, but I strongly believe they will be a consumer product people will use to do their errands or send on business trips. It's not that the robots will try to pull a hostile takeover. It's that they won't have to because we'll have already handed them the keys.

http://www.geminoid.jp/en/index.html


message 12: by Nik (last edited May 04, 2018 10:56AM) (new)

Nik Krasno | 13781 comments What will billions of people, performing physical work do, when robots come to replace them?


message 13: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 5520 comments Rebel and smash the robots? Turn to crime? Become homeless? Receive a government stipend and numb themselves with drugs? Receive a government stipend and be happy they don't have to work like a dog. All of the above? None of the above?


message 14: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 13781 comments Scout wrote: "Rebel and smash the robots? Turn to crime? Become homeless? Receive a government stipend and numb themselves with drugs? Receive a government stipend and be happy they don't have to work like a dog..."

My answer was 'becoming indie authors' -:)
I think people, skilled and unskilled alike, shouldn't be destined to starve because all the options are closed, so yes - if there are no jobs - then maybe a stipend, similarly like we care for disabled.


message 15: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 5520 comments :-)
In that case, I see an uptick in alcohol and drug abuse and probably suicide. What able-bodied and thinking person wants a stipend they haven't earned? To be treated as if they were disabled? Just don't think a stipend instead of employment would make for a healthy society.


message 16: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 13781 comments Scout wrote: ":-)
In that case, I see an uptick in alcohol and drug abuse and probably suicide. What able-bodied and thinking person wants a stipend they haven't earned? To be treated as if they were disabled?..."


Not sure work vaccinates against booze and drugs. I'm sure, there will always be a large segment of population that won't make do with a stipend and will aspire for more - biz, ideas whatever.
Besides, you'll find a nice bunch of talented authors, artists and other geniuses among heavy alcohol or drug abusers -:)
Still, don't try at home


message 17: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 5520 comments There's no vaccination against booze and drugs. I was just thinking about stories I've heard about driven people (cops, docs, etc.) who've retired and become depressed. Take away their job, and you take away their identity. You do see that?

But give artists, writers, and geniuses a stipend, and that's better than having a patron as those like Leonardo had in the old days. Creative freedom - and money for booze and debauchery :-)


message 18: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 13781 comments Scout wrote: "Take away their job, and you take away their identity. You do see that?..."

Don't know about the identity, but I do notice that people often deteriorate quickly once they become pensioners and change their decades-long working patterns. Don't know whether research supports that, but from my own observations winding down the activity seems to increase the likelihood of medical or other events..


message 19: by Michel (new)

Michel Poulin Becoming mostly inactive and without further goals will tend to bring in depressions and unhealthy lifestyles. One way after retiring to not fall into those traps is to adopt/continue personal hobbies or, if you're lucky enough to have the money for it, start traveling around the World to experience new sights and experiences. My own post-retirement solution: write even more books!


message 20: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 5520 comments I'm more happy in retirement than I was in the last 10 years of employment. The stress and lack of control over my environment pissed me off. But I've always been goal-oriented, and now I have lots of time for family and projects that interest me. I like being in control of my time, and every day is satisfying.

What about this when the robots rule? Give artists, writers, and geniuses a stipend, and that's better than having a patron as those like Leonardo had in the old days. Creative freedom - and money for booze and debauchery :-)


message 21: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 13781 comments Are people better in playing robots or robots - people?


message 23: by Lizzie (new)

Lizzie | 1660 comments Scout wrote: "I'm more happy in retirement than I was in the last 10 years of employment. The stress and lack of control over my environment pissed me off. But I've always been goal-oriented, and now I have lots..."

I wish I was happy in retirement. I think my problem is the disability cause. I loved being a paralegal - challenging mentally, research and writing, organization, interacting with people, making deals with lawyers, and continuing education. Because of the disability, I couldn't even volunteer because I can't predict from hour to hour how wells my arms and hands will work. It also limits hobbies and what I can accomplish.

To be honest, I think I was more of a robot as a parent running a home. My career was never robotic. Jobs when I was 17 to 24, I think the world was too new for me to be robotic - from store cashier, to college library, to offices, to ice house bar tender.


message 24: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 5520 comments You do have the joy of driving your car of choice and the freedom that brings. Enjoy!


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