Ender's Game 2017 discussion

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message 1: by [deleted user] (new)

What specific themes did the author emphasize throughout the novel? What do you think he or she is trying to get across to the reader? How did the author try to do this?


message 2: by Vivian (last edited Feb 06, 2017 08:09AM) (new)

Vivian Hartwig | 8 comments I think some of the specific themes that the author emphasized throughout the novel was that we need to understand someone before we can judge them. For example, the buggers are misunderstood because we can't communicate with them, and at the end, Ender was able to communicate with one after he understood them.
(Viv H)


message 3: by Jackson (new)

Jackson | 7 comments The theme I think the overall story is probably invasion/colonization because throughout the book all the time you hear people say things all about the first and second invasion making you think "hey there's going to be a third invasion somewhere in the book but all you see are games but it turns out that the third invasion has been going on for how long and you don't know until they just come out and say "you just won against the third invasion" and its all of a sudden it's pretty much done.


message 4: by Chase (new)

Chase | 8 comments I think the author is trying to show that someday we wont be safe and maybe their are aliens out their trying to find a new home that we dont know about. The author tried to do this by showing how desperate the world was for highly good soldiers.


message 5: by Vivian (new)

Vivian Hartwig | 8 comments Jackson wrote: "The theme I think the overall story is probably invasion/colonization because throughout the book all the time you hear people say things all about the first and second invasion making you think "h..."

I agree that the theme could be colonization and invasion because of the buggers trying to colonize earth, and to us it is invasion. Though I still believe that another theme is understanding.


message 6: by Lea (new)

Lea | 6 comments One of the themes could be how we shouldn't under/overestimate people, such as Ender being a Third and yet highly dangerous. An underlying theme through the book is overpopulation, there aren't even laws describing how people cannot have more than two children unless otherwise directed to. Another thing that's mainly shown in the last part is when we learn the buggers cannot communicate verbally, and yet are still highly intelligent beings. Ender discovers that they had adapted to their environment and made it extremely suitable to their needs, and even had the ability to travel through space, which is technology beyond our current understanding. (Although, not the book's. My point being the buggers are smarter than humans are right now.) Therefore, my conclusion is that just because a species evolved differently or communicates differently etc. than you, does not necessarily mean they are less smart than your species. The author also used a lot of diversity in his story, and is trying to get across to the reader that no matter what someone's religion/race/etc. is we should be openness to accepting them as friends, as seen by Ender's interaction with the other people on the battle station.


message 7: by Lea (new)

Lea | 6 comments Vivian wrote: "I think some of the specific themes that the author emphasized throughout the novel was that we need to understand someone before we can judge them. For example, the buggers are misunderstood becau..."

I agree with this statement because we need to understand people before we can criticize them. If we know their reasons for something, again, the example being the buggers, we can see exactly why they do something, even if we don't agree with it necessarily. Even though the end where Ender can communicate with the buggers could be said to be illogical, it's symbolizing his ability to understand the buggers empathetically.


message 8: by Aaron (new)

Aaron | 8 comments I believe the most emphasized theme throughout this book was do not judge by something/ones looks or age. Just because Ender was young and not as big as others, no one thought he would do anything to do with earths history but in fact he more than likely saves earth from some huge tragedies. With that I believe Orson Card was trying to influence readers to not judge from this book.


message 9: by Matt (new)

Matt Katcher | 8 comments I think that the most emphasized theme of the book is that people need to be caring and they need to understand who people really are and understand peoples' perspectives before they can judge them or think differently about them. I think the author is saying that when we take this to heart we can make the world a better, more peaceful place. The author is doing this by showing that the buggers didn't understand the humans and that they only found out about them through Ender and that all they really wanted was peace.


message 10: by Vivian (new)

Vivian | 8 comments Lea wrote: "One of the themes could be how we shouldn't under/overestimate people, such as Ender being a Third and yet highly dangerous. An underlying theme through the book is overpopulation, there aren't eve..."
I agree with Lea this book has a theme of not underestimating kids even if they are male or female.


message 11: by Vivian (new)

Vivian | 8 comments This book suggests a theme that Ender may be small and young but he is mighty. Anyone can always learn and no one is ever the smartest or strongest. The story also suggests that people need to not judge and push the stronger people away and to use others strong points to your advantage.


message 12: by Aaron (new)

Aaron | 8 comments Vivian wrote: "I think some of the specific themes that the author emphasized throughout the novel was that we need to understand someone before we can judge them. For example, the buggers are misunderstood becau..."
I agree that the book emphasized the theme to not judge. Like in chapter 5 there is a guy that tells everyone they are a nobody before seeing them in a game. Later on in the book these people prove they are more then what people believe they are.


message 13: by Matt (new)

Matt Katcher | 8 comments Aaron wrote: "I believe the most emphasized theme throughout this book was not judge by something/ones looks or age. Just because Ender was young and not as big as others, no one thought he would do anything ..."

I agree with this. Because everyone thought that all the teachers were just treating Ender like a teacher's pet and nobody liked him because he was advancing so young and they didn't like how he was smart. But then when he is put to use and he does advance he becomes the best soldier in the Battle School. So yeah they judge "the book" by it's "cover" and they were wrong.


message 14: by Jackson (new)

Jackson | 7 comments Chase wrote: "I think the author is trying to show that someday we wont be safe and maybe their are aliens out their trying to find a new home that we dont know about. The author tried to do this by showing how ..."

I think that the idea of the author saying that the earth has a chance of being attack by aliens is a good idea and I think that maybe the author did have his as a thought.


message 15: by Nicholas (new)

Nicholas | 5 comments I think that the author is trying to tell us about family. Nobody had family at Battle School, and look what happened. Somebody got a bruised testicle! (Card 116) He may never have children to be forced to be sent off to battle school.


message 16: by Ethan (new)

Ethan | 8 comments I believe the most emphasized theme throughout the book was not to judge someone on just there age or level of intelligence. Everyone underestimated Ender, but he overcame them and showed them different. I think that the lesson Orson Card was trying to tell was that no matter how deep down people are pushing you, you can always push through and overcome their mean qualities and antics. Orson Card showed this by writing about Ender and how, even though he was one of the youngest there, he overpowered and was better at almost everything than the older children, even after they continued to pick on him and try and make him feel like he was less then he actually was.


message 17: by Ethan (new)

Ethan | 8 comments Aaron wrote: "I believe the most emphasized theme throughout this book was do not judge by something/ones looks or age. Just because Ender was young and not as big as others, no one thought he would do anything ..."
I agree with what you said Aaron. What you said about judgement, and how not to judge people on their age and abilities, is exactly what I thought about the lesson Orson Card was trying to teach. I agree with your statement about Ender saving the world and overcoming the disadvantages that the older kids made more prominent. He did save the world from buggers and id a better job than any of the other kids could have done.


message 18: by Reid (new)

Reid | 7 comments I think one of the themes was to not judge someone by their age. Because the things Ender did were things that no ordinary person could od, he had a great mind with great talents. I think that his siblings were also brilliant in their own way too, and the author is trying to get across to us by these things. The author did this by sending a message, that just because you are a kid doesn't mean you can't make a difference, so you can do great things like Ender


message 19: by Zach (new)

Zach Helberg | 7 comments The main theme I believe the author was trying to get across was that we shouldn't immediately mark someone as our enemy before we know them. For example, several times throughout the story Ender was marked as an enemy to everyone else because he was thought of as better than everyone else and then thought of as too young and finally thought of as too successful for his own good.This is also portrayed through the buggers and how the humans reacted to their initial attacks. Immediately after the Second Invasion, the Humans sent out attack forces to eliminate them. Little did they know, the buggers were actually wanting peace after they realized that humans were intelligent.


message 20: by Zane (new)

Zane | 7 comments I think that the most emphasized theme in the book would be don't judge people in their intelligents level and how old they are. Everybody in the book was not believing in Ender but that didn't stop him he kept going and proved them wrong. I think what the author is saying is that no matter how many times people tell you no that you keep pushing and prove them wrong.


message 21: by Zach (new)

Zach Helberg | 7 comments Matt wrote: "I think that the most emphasized theme of the book is that people need to be caring and they need to understand who people really are and understand peoples' perspectives before they can judge them..."

I agree with you fully. The author did a good job at portraying that maybe humans are a bit too impulsive and that we shouldn't judge someone just because of what we think we know about them. Too many times in this book, the characters were evasive about what the buggers really wanted or why they wanted to eliminate the buggers entirely, and I'm still not sure anyone actually had a reason besides "well, they killed us so let's kill them".


message 22: by Cole (new)

Cole | 8 comments I think it was cool but it was a let down since there was no big final battle. I think it was bad since he was actually fighting buggers in real life even though it was a video game like thing.


PrestonThecommunist | 7 comments Personally I found the message to be somthing along the lines of "Dont be impulsive and judge people on appearance" First impressions of ender being a young boy told me he would not accomplish much but when ender went into the battle room it spun a much different story later in the book


message 24: by Cole (new)

Cole | 8 comments Reid wrote: "I think one of the themes was to not judge someone by their age. Because the things Ender did were things that no ordinary person could od, he had a great mind with great talents. I think that his ..."

I agree since it turned out the buggers were just like humans. I feel that he wouldn't of done that if he knew it was real life.I feel that the author is trying to give that theme of sadness and guilt.


message 25: by Blake (new)

Blake | 8 comments I think that the theme of this book is similar to "Don't judge a book by its cover" in a way where it isn't a book, it is instead a person. This person being Ender, was promoted at an early age and was small compared to the other boys he was working with. But it was only when Ender finally became commander when the older commanders started to not underestimate Ender.


message 26: by Blake (last edited Feb 21, 2017 11:46AM) (new)

Blake | 8 comments Cole wrote: "I think it was cool but it was a let down since there was no big final battle. I think it was bad since he was actually fighting buggers in real life even though it was a video game like thing."

I can agree that it was a disappointment in some ways, but it also shows how good Ender can be if he saves the world as if it were a videogame.



message 27: by Coy (new)

Coy Sarsfield | 8 comments Some specific themes the author emphasized are you should always pick the right decision no matter what. He is trying to tell us that we should always make the right decisions. For example when Ender went to the buggers planet, "I just want one thing clear. I'm not going for you. I'm not going in order to be governor, or because I'm bored here. I'm going because I know the buggers better than any other living soul, and maybe if I go there I can understand them better. I stole their future from them; I can only begin to repay by seeing what I can learn from their past," (Card 314). This passage shows the theme of making right decisions.


message 28: by Coy (new)

Coy Sarsfield | 8 comments Reid wrote: "I think one of the themes was to not judge someone by their age. Because the things Ender did were things that no ordinary person could od, he had a great mind with great talents. I think that his ..." I agree with you Ender did things even Adults could not even do. He outsmarted people twice his age and size many time. I believe this is a good theme.


message 29: by Nick (new)

Nick Beevers | 8 comments I feel like the overall theme to this story is, no matter how old you are, you can accomplish anything. The author got this theme across because Ender defeated an entire army at eleven years old.


message 30: by Nick (new)

Nick Beevers | 8 comments Ethan wrote: "I believe the most emphasized theme throughout the book was not to judge someone on just there age or level of intelligence. Everyone underestimated Ender, but he overcame them and showed them diff..." I agree with this statement. This also goes along with "don't judge a book by its cover, because the way Ender looks, it doesn't look like he could defeat an entire army.


message 31: by Jonathan (new)

Jonathan Hecht | 7 comments I think one of the themes that the author emphasizes throughout the novel is don't judge people based on their size because even though Ender was small and looked weak he actually turned out to be really good at practically everything, he won every battle, even the battle that the mighty Mazor Rackham couldn't have done, and he could defend himself pretty well against Stilson and Bonzo. I think the point that the author is trying to get across is even if someone doesn't look big and strong it doesn't mean that they aren't and it could also kind of mean that you can do anything you want no matter what you look like because if Ender could do all that even though he didn't look very big and strong then pretty much anyone could do at least what they wanted. I think the author tried to get his point across by making Ender appear small and weak but doing all this stuff that a lot of other people couldn't even do, and Ender got farther than pretty much everyone regardless of his size and strength.


message 32: by Jonathan (new)

Jonathan Hecht | 7 comments Vivian wrote: "This book suggests a theme that Ender may be small and young but he is mighty. Anyone can always learn and no one is ever the smartest or strongest. The story also suggests that people need to not ..."

I agree with Vivian because we both kind of had the same thoughts that even though Ender was small and very young he still did more than almost everyone else at the school and did better than almost everyone else even though he was smaller, weaker, and a lot younger than most of the people there.


message 33: by Ryan (new)

Ryan Hutchinson | 8 comments After reading the book, I feel like they put a lot of time into establishing Ender as a character, since he goes through a lot over the course of the book. He has to do some things during his training, and the war that don't always seem right. The theme is very serious with the impending doom that we believe must await us when the aliens finally do return and we have to fight them again. Nobody really has much hope left, even Valentine admits that she doesn't see our chances as being very good. We get a look at what that sort of thing does to a person with Peter. He's been living with this for years, and it's made him go a little crazy. He tortures and kills squirrels for fun, and he doesn't seem to be too hesitant about doing the same to a person. He threatens to kill Ender and Valentine, and means it. He isn't a bad person, he just needs help. But that truly enhances the feeling of dread that the theme is going for in this novel. Ender questions whether or not he might end up as psychotic and murderous as Peter if this continues any longer.


message 34: by Ryan (new)

Ryan Hutchinson | 8 comments Cole wrote: "I think it was cool but it was a let down since there was no big final battle. I think it was bad since he was actually fighting buggers in real life even though it was a video game like thing."

I feel like they did that on purpose, the Colonel told him it was a training exercise, but it was the real thing. He had to make some difficult decisions in those battles. Since he thought it was just a game, he was willing to sacrifice peoples lives in order to win, but he would have hesitated to do that if he knew that those were real people he was commanding. That hesitation could mean the difference between winning and losing the war, and, as we know, meant extinction, which the government, wouldn't take for an answer.


message 35: by Gavyn (new)

Gavyn | 8 comments I believe the most emphasized theme throughout this book was do not judge people by someones looks or age. Just because Ender was young and was not the biggest of the others doesn't mean he cant be better then them. No one thought he would do anything to do with earths history but in fact he more than likely saves earth from some huge disaster then anyone else. With that I believe Orson Card was trying to influence readers to not judge people on who they look or what they do differently then you.


message 36: by Gavyn (new)

Gavyn | 8 comments Aaron wrote: "I believe the most emphasized theme throughout this book was do not judge by something/ones looks or age. Just because Ender was young and not as big as others, no one thought he would do anything ..."

I agree with this theme i wrote about the same one. The author is trying to show you many things. One of the things I think he is trying to tell us is no madder who you are you can do anything. Also i believe he is trying to show us not to judge people.


message 37: by Reid (new)

Reid | 7 comments Ethan wrote: "I believe the most emphasized theme throughout the book was not to judge someone on just there age or level of intelligence. Everyone underestimated Ender, but he overcame them and showed them diff..."

I agree with what you said Ethan, I think one of the messages in the story is to not underestimate someone by their age. People did underestimate Ender even though he won a lot of the game as a commander. I think that Ender pushed thorugh the people that were trying to drag him down and he kept going forward, and tht made him stronger


message 38: by Austin (new)

Austin Verge | 8 comments I think that the theme is that even though someone could be small doesn't mean that they are weak or not the smartest. I think she emphasized it by showing that ender was a small kid and not the biggest, but he could handle himself if it need to come to that. one example is when he hits Stilton with his shoe in the face and goes on to win the battle against him for good. He also has proved himself in the battle room with his smarts. For instance when he taught the kids to fight at a laying down position rather then a standing up position.


message 39: by Chase (last edited Mar 20, 2017 06:25AM) (new)

Chase | 8 comments Vivian wrote: "I think some of the specific themes that the author emphasized throughout the novel was that we need to understand someone before we can judge them. For example, the buggers are misunderstood becau..."
I agree with Vivian that we need to understand someone before we judge someone. Ender didn't judge the buggers he wanted to understand them unlike everyone else they just wanted to attack


PrestonThecommunist | 7 comments Cole wrote: "I think it was cool but it was a let down since there was no big final battle. I think it was bad since he was actually fighting buggers in real life even though it was a video game like thing."
Again in your other review just like this one you have put the minimal amount of effort into it. Im starting to think that you are using a template since both of your reviews start with "I think it was cool" This is not a 3rd grade class project its a literary analysis


message 41: by Austin (new)

Austin Verge | 8 comments Nick wrote: "I feel like the overall theme to this story is, no matter how old you are, you can accomplish anything. The author got this theme across because Ender defeated an entire army at eleven years old."

i agree. because even though ender is still a kid he defeats a whole species with his intellectual strength because they were out numbered.


message 42: by Dalton (new)

Dalton Delay | 4 comments I think the author is trying to show that someday we wont be safe and maybe their are more advanced enemies out there and they could attack. The author tried to do this by showing how desperate the world was by creating highly trained soldiers.


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