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Agony Aunt > Need clarification on English version

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message 1: by Jagriti (new)

Jagriti (Abhinita) | 201 comments Hello Everybody

I am new to goodreads and self-publishing. This may be a silly question but it's bothered me for sometime. Will really appreciate if someone can clarify for me please.

My book was uploaded in US English on Amazon.com. Will this automatically be available in UK English in UK or do I need to upload the book again in UK English.

How dose the version thing work's. Ideally, I want to leave the choice with the reader. Is there some way to do this? Or is it already available.

Myself I have bought many books on kindle, but never have actually bothered with this before.

Look forward to your help. Thank you in advance!


Patti (baconater) (goldengreene) | 61757 comments Sorry. I can't even.

I haven't the patience this evening.


message 3: by Kath (new)

Kath Middleton | 25061 comments The same version will be on all Amazon sites. However, I know it's possible to uploads two different versions to .com and .co.uk. I've never done it, though, as my writing is unashamedly English. I think they will help if you query it with Kindle Direct Publishing.


message 4: by Jim (new)

Jim | 21836 comments Just to second Kath
Actually English people are far more forgiving of American English than Americans are of proper grown up English ;-)


message 5: by Chris (last edited Jan 27, 2017 12:57PM) (new)

Chris Robb (chrisrobb) | 1738 comments Yes you do need to upload two different versions. You can have the same title, but they will have different ASINs and you will have two of the same title on your KDP Bookshelf.

Don't forget there are many other territories that will expect US English if you go that route. It's fairly obvious on the list.

Unless it's set in the US, I wouldn't bother, as you then have two separate editions to maintain for every little change.

If you use MS Word, it is possible to set one document to US English and leave the other as UK English. Then just run spell check to change labour to labor etc.

However, it won't help you with vital differences such as trainers or sneakers, boot or trunk, tap or faucet, lads or guys, mates or buddies, etc.

You have to decide whether it's worth it.


message 6: by Jagriti (new)

Jagriti (Abhinita) | 201 comments Hello Everybody

Thank you very much for all your valuable inputs.

My first part of the book started in India so I think the spell check route should suffice for now. However, as the story moves forward it will scout different parts of the world and for that I will reserve the difference in usage in mind.

Just one other clarification, I know UK English is used in UK, India, South Africa & US English is predominantly used in US, Brazil, Japan.

But in EU countries, Australia, Canada ...I am not very sure?

Just thinking can I make both versions available and let the reader decide what they prefer?

This is so confusing... Am I thinking too much! God help me please!


Michael Cargill Cargill (michaelcargill) | 2997 comments My opinion is that producing different versions of English is going to result in a considerable amount of additional work for no real benefit.

If writing in UK English upsets a few Yanks in the Midwest, so be it.


message 8: by Jagriti (new)

Jagriti (Abhinita) | 201 comments Thank you Michael! Have a nice day!


message 9: by Jim (new)

Jim | 21836 comments Jagriti wrote: "Thank you Michael! Have a nice day!"

I'm with Michael, risk upsetting the Midwest :-)


message 10: by David (new)

David Manuel | 1147 comments Jim wrote: "Just to second Kath
Actually English people are far more forgiving of American English than Americans are of proper grown up English ;-)"


This comment surprises me. I've never known anyone over on this side of the pond to complain about books written using UK spelling and idioms. More typical, in my experience, is for people to react to UK English, both written and spoken, as if it automatically proves the author or speaker to be somehow smarter and more educated. Seriously, that scene in Love Actually with the blue-collar Brit walking into an American bar and having women fall all over him is closer to the truth than not.

That said, I do not live in the Midwest (although I grew up in Texas). Maybe us coastal pinheads aren't representative.

But I would be interested to hear any complaints you guys have gotten about your English from us 'mericans.


message 11: by Jim (new)

Jim | 21836 comments I remember somebody commenting that they had a review where the reviewer complained of spelling errors and the errors highlighted were actually just English Spelling. I've been lucky in that regard :-)
On the other hand I sell few books into the US :-(


message 12: by Philip (new)

Philip Dodd (philipdodd) | 148 comments There is no need for an English version and an American English version of the same book. English people read novels and verse written by American authors in American English, and American people read novels and verse written by English authors in English as it is written and spoken in the United Kingdom. In England, we spell some words differently than they do in America, that is all. I have never heard of a United Kingdom English version and an American English version of the same book. The problem that Jagriti has created should not exist.


Desley (Cat fosterer) (booktigger) | 11045 comments Philip wrote: "There is no need for an English version and an American English version of the same book. English people read novels and verse written by American authors in American English, and American people r..."

I came across a few US/UK versions when I first got my kindle, the only one I can remember was a horror book that had some content changed as well as spelling.


message 14: by David (new)

David Manuel | 1147 comments Jim wrote: "I remember somebody commenting that they had a review where the reviewer complained of spelling errors and the errors highlighted were actually just English Spelling. I've been lucky in that regard..."

That's sad. I guess I grew up reading lots of English authors so it just seems natural to me to see English spellings. And, for what it's worth, I sell few books in the US as well. Or anywhere else, for that matter! ;-)


message 15: by Kath (new)

Kath Middleton | 25061 comments I've seen various books with an option for UK or US English. I can happily read either and don't really need an option.


message 16: by Chris (new)

Chris Robb (chrisrobb) | 1738 comments David wrote: "Jim wrote: "Just to second Kath
Actually English people are far more forgiving of American English than Americans are of proper grown up English ;-)"

This comment surprises me. I've never known an..."

Hi David,
I am a huge Yankophile (I've been to 35 US States) but I just can't resist expressing my horror at the expression "gotten".
If you'll pardon me taking the liberty, the correct English is:
"But I would be interested to hear any complaints you guys have got about your English from us 'mericans."


message 17: by David (new)

David Manuel | 1147 comments Chris wrote: " I just can't resist expressing my horror at the expression "gotten"..."

http://grammarist.com/usage/got-gotten/


message 18: by Tim (new)

Tim | 9478 comments Nothing wrong with gotten, and although it's generally thought of as being purely American, it's really not.


message 19: by Chris (new)

Chris Robb (chrisrobb) | 1738 comments David, Tim,
Thanks, I feel both foolish and elucidated.
I should have realised that it is indeed good English from ill-gotten gains.
David, my apologies.


message 20: by Chris (new)

Chris Robb (chrisrobb) | 1738 comments David? Do you follow this discussion:
https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/...


message 21: by David (new)

David Manuel | 1147 comments Chris wrote: "David, Tim,
Thanks, I feel both foolish and elucidated.
I should have realised that it is indeed good English from ill-gotten gains.
David, my apologies."


No need for apologies. I assumed you were trying to counter Jim's point about Americans being less forgiving than the English by being unforgivingly outraged by my American vernacular! :-)


message 22: by David (new)

David Manuel | 1147 comments Chris wrote: "David? Do you follow this discussion:
https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/..."


Haven't been. I'm too much of a rube. ;-)


message 23: by Chris (new)

Chris Robb (chrisrobb) | 1738 comments David wrote: "Chris wrote: "David, Tim,
Thanks, I feel both foolish and elucidated.
I should have realised that it is indeed good English from ill-gotten gains.
David, my apologies."

No need for apologies. I ..."


I wish I'd been that clever!


message 24: by David (new)

David Manuel | 1147 comments Chris wrote: "David, Tim,
Thanks, I feel both foolish and elucidated.
I should have realised that it is indeed good English from ill-gotten gains.
David, my apologies."


Oh, and to add, you could never feel as foolish as I used to in the following recurring conversation I used to have with the BBC stringer to Eritrea when we were both living in Asmara.

Him: I got so pissed last night.
Me: Really? What happened?
Him (giving me a puzzled look); I told you. I got pissed.
Me: Did you get in a fight or something?
Him: What are you on about? I got pissed. You know. Drunk.
Me: Oh, I thought you got mad at someone.
Him: I said 'pissed,' not 'pissed off.'

In my defense, he bears at least some responsibility for getting pissed so often...


message 25: by Chris (new)

Chris Robb (chrisrobb) | 1738 comments I am reminded of the story from WWII of the German POW Camp officer giving a dressing down to the british prisoners after an escape attempt was thwarted. He prided himself on his grasp of English, even the vernacular.
The more he shouted at them, the funnier the POWs found it.
Working himself up into a fury, he shouted at them, "You damned British! You think I know fucking nothing, but I tell you... I know fuck all!"


Patti (baconater) (goldengreene) | 61757 comments I don't think the version of English used is important as long as it is consistent in its spelling and grammar and is free of typos.


message 27: by Jim (new)

Jim | 21836 comments Patti (baconater) wrote: "I don't think the version of English used is important as long as it is consistent in its spelling and grammar and is free of typos."

you mean the words have all their proper letters in :-)


Patti (baconater) (goldengreene) | 61757 comments Capitals and punctuation also never goes amiss, Jimbo. ;)


message 29: by Jim (new)

Jim | 21836 comments Patti (baconater) wrote: "Capitals and punctuation also never goes amiss, Jimbo. ;)"

ABsolutely: Garcon, plenty ! of both For the Lady.


Patti (baconater) (goldengreene) | 61757 comments Tut.


message 31: by Jagriti (new)

Jagriti (Abhinita) | 201 comments Thank you Patti, Jim, Chris, David, Tim, Kath, Desley, Philip, Micheal!

Thank you all for your inputs. Its been entertaining and enlightening. Had no intention to start a controversy between two sides but on the contrary wanted to steer away. During my stay in different parts of the world, I found language to be both sensitive and personal issue.

As a reader, I personally accepted either, focus mainly stayed on the story or plot but had friends who picked this up over conversations. This was specially true where English is not the main language.

As a new bee in this field, I didn't want to upset anyone!

Point taken on the grammar & punctuation and agree wholeheartedly.

Cheers everyone and have a lovely Sunday!


message 32: by Chris (new)

Chris Robb (chrisrobb) | 1738 comments Please, Jagriti, we should be thanking you for the opportunity you gave us for an interesting and stimulating discussion that gave us the opportunity for including some examles of our superb humour.
All the lovely people above have had a discussion, without rudeness, which is a wonderful thing.


message 33: by Jagriti (new)

Jagriti (Abhinita) | 201 comments Pleasure was all mine Chris! :)


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