Jane Austen discussion

69 views
A Useful Woman by Darcie Wilde > Darcie Wilde Talks with JA Group about Her Writings

Comments Showing 1-50 of 57 (57 new)    post a comment »
« previous 1

message 1: by SarahC, Austen Votary & Mods' Asst. (new)

SarahC (sarahcarmack) | 1473 comments Mod
Hello JA members,

I've been looking forward to this week for some time. We have had the pleasure of author Darcie Wilde's participation here by her providing us a small set of books to share throughout the discussion. She will come online on Thursday, October 20, to respond to posts about the book and her writing career. I am happy to have this opportunity, as she has been greatly influenced by Austen and other classic literature that many of us enjoy. Thanks in advance for her offer to talk with us.

If you would like to begin posting comments now specifically for her, please feel free to do so and she will join the discussion on Thursday. We will continue discussing Useful Woman in the chapter threads as we have been.

Thanks to all the Jane Austen members for a great discussion so far. Shared thoughts and viewpoints make my reading interests more enjoyable and meaningful, and I believe I don't speak only for myself on that.


message 2: by Abigail (new)

Abigail Bok (regency_reader) | 491 comments We all appreciate your generosity in making a number of copies available, which really facilitated and expanded our conversation!

I enjoyed your book a lot, especially the care you put into crafting the plot, which seemed to grow organically out of the world and the society you depicted. None of the plot events felt arbitrary or manufactured to me—and that seems like something that’s hard to do! I was carried willingly along throughout.

I also thought your dialogue was very well written; the conversations were subtle and filled with layered meanings. A lot of fiction labeled “Austenesque” has a slapdash feel to it, and yours was just the opposite.

And I really like Rosalind! And look forward to her further adventures . . . there will be further adventures, won’t there?


message 3: by Emilia (new)

Emilia Barnes | 259 comments Yes! Thank you for the free copy! And for the book itself, too, because it was great fun to read, and I will definitely investigate sequels, as well as recommend this to like-minded friends :)

My question is: how much of the period detail about Almack's and Bow Street is fact and how much is fiction? Did you construct the murder at Almack's with the layout of the place in mind, or did you make the layout fit the needs of your mystery?


message 4: by Sarah (new)

Sarah Zettel (DarcieWilde) | 28 comments Hello Everyone!

First of all, thank you so much for inviting me to be a part of this discussion. I was so delighted to hear that the Jane Austen Readers would be taking a walk through Rosalind's London. Obviously (I hope it's obvious) that Miss Austen's work were a huge influence on my writing, and on my decision to set a series of mysteries in the Regency era.


message 5: by Sarah (new)

Sarah Zettel (DarcieWilde) | 28 comments BTW, that Sarah up there is because my given name is Sarah, and that's what Goodreads knows me as. This really is Darcie Wilde typing here, not your Sarah C.


message 6: by Sarah (new)

Sarah Zettel (DarcieWilde) | 28 comments Abigail wrote: "We all appreciate your generosity in making a number of copies available, which really facilitated and expanded our conversation!

I enjoyed your book a lot, especially the care you put into craft..."


Abigail: First of all, thank you so much. I'm glad you enjoyed the dialogue. When thinking in terms of Austen, and writers of the period in general, I think so much of the delight is in the dialogue, especially the wit. So I worked hard on getting as much of that feel as I could.

Yes, there will be at least one more book. A PURELY PRIVATE MATTER will be coming out next year. If you go to www.darciewilderomance.com you can get a preview of the cover (which is, BTW, gorgeous).


message 7: by Sarah (new)

Sarah Zettel (DarcieWilde) | 28 comments My question is: how much of the period detail about Almack's and Bow Street is fact and how much is fiction? Did you construct the murder at Almack's with the layout of the place in mind, or did you make the layout fit the needs of your mystery?

Thanks for the question. The answer is, I went spelunking for as many facts as I could find. I am a long time reader of Regency romances. Obviously, I love Miss Austen, but I'm also a huge fan of Georgette Heyer. And while reading not only those writers, but about the history of the Regency, I came across the concept of the "silver fork" novel. This was a class of book that became popular right after JA's period, starting really in about 1825. These were essentially the grandmothers of the modern romance genre, and one of the most popular (and scandalous) was a book called "Almack's" by Marianne Spencer Stanhope. When it came out, it purported to be an expose of the machinations of the women who controlled access to that exclusive club. I decided I'd read so much about Almack's in modern literature and retellings, I'd see what the contemporary opinion was (more)


message 8: by Sarah (new)

Sarah Zettel (DarcieWilde) | 28 comments In Almack's, one of the characters talks about a woman in "reduced circumstances" who lives off her friends and is tolerated because she makes herself "useful," by handling basic social chores and finding tickets to balls and concerts, etc. Here was a situation I'd never even heard of before, and it was tossed off so casually, it was clearly a case that Spencer Stanhope expected her readers to be familiar with that kind of situation. That's how Rosalind herself was born. Her description of how one got membership to Almack's comes from the same novel. I tried hard to find period sources to back it all up, but there was very little available. There are good websites about the Regency out there, but most of them get their information on Almack's from the same source, that is about 3 pages from the memoir of Captain Reese Howell Gronow "Anecdotes of the Camp, the Court and the Clubs (a fascinating read in and of itself." I did find an image of an actual voucher online. I also found a collected set of letters from Countess Esterhazy, which were absolutly fascinating. (More)


Andrea AKA Catsos Person (catsosperson) | 169 comments Sarah,

I don't have any keen or insightful questions.

I really enjoyed the book.

I read mainstream Historical romances and though your book is not of that genre, you gave me what a want from any type of historical novel--to feel transported into the past. Not all authors are entirely successful in pulling this off. I was really happy with your book in this regard.

You managed to make Rosalind independent, unconventional BUT still a woman of her times and I appreciate that.

Was it a struggle to keep Rosalind a woman of the time yet unconventional? Sometimes I feel when authors try to make a female character unconventional in a historical novel, they end up with a 21st C woman in a long dress who rides in horse-drawn carriages.

How much of a challenge was it to make Rosalind relatable to modern readers, but make as a character, reflect the time period?


message 10: by Sarah (new)

Sarah Zettel (DarcieWilde) | 28 comments As for the details on Bow Street, there are 2 really good books now available. The first is THE FIRST ENGLISH DETECTIVES, by J.M. Beattie, who does a fantastic job on the history of the runners and their role in law enforcement before 1828, and also covers the...weirdness and complexity of policing before Robert Peel and his reforms. The second is A CERTAIN SHARE OF LOW CUNNING, by David Cox, which talks about the part the runners and principal officers played outside the boundaries of London. Thanks to the internet, I was also able to find some contemporary, or near contemporary accounts of the runners and the watch. Things like the description of John Townsend is as close to contemporary accounts as I could keep it. Samuel Tauton is likewise a real person, and there are some contemporary accounts of him, and his prodigious memory.


Carol She's So Novel꧁꧂ Hi Sarah!

Thanks for making a copy of A Useful Woman (Rosalind Thorne Mysteries #1) by Darcie Wilde available. I really love that cover! Do you get any input to the cover art or approval of the artist?


message 12: by Sarah (new)

Sarah Zettel (DarcieWilde) | 28 comments Andrea (Catsos Person) is a Compulsive eBook Hoarder wrote: "Andrea (Catsos Person) is a Compulsive eBook Hoarder (CatsosPerson) | 64 comments Sarah,

I read mainstream Historical romances


ME TOO!

"and though your book is not of that genre, you gave me what a want from any type of historical novel--to feel transported into the past. Not all authors are entirely successful in pulling this off. I was really happy with your book in this regard."

Thanks so much.

"Was it a struggle to keep Rosalind a woman of the time yet unconventional? Sometimes I feel when authors try to make a female character unconventional in a historical novel, they end up with a 21st C woman in a long dress who rides in horse-drawn carriages. How much of a challenge was it to make Rosalind relatable to modern readers, but make as a character, reflect the time period?

Yeah, this can be a real challenge when writing a historical. I found my footing by reading the writing of the time. The novels of the period talk so much about the lives and expectations of and for women. The more I read, the easier it became to get a feel for the realities of their existence, even though my primary sources were fiction. Take for example, Pride & Prejudice. If you read the book, as opposed to seeing the adaptations, you realize that one of the problems the girls face was their father, and his laziness. He left their upbringing to their mother, who was not up to the job, and their doweries to...what? Chance? Fate? He didn't make any move to see to education for them, or to press any of his female relatives to help them into the social situations they would need to make the decent marriages that were the only future. Yes, that was supposed to be the mother's job, but he can't have been ignorant of their position, or his own. He was a gentleman of the time. How BLEEPING frustrated Lizzie must have been. And can you blame Mary for being sour, or the younger girls for being wild? Ahem. Not that I have opinions or anything. But there's an example of how reading the novels of the time can give a modern writer a way to make the situations believeable to a contemporary audience.


message 13: by Sarah (new)

Sarah Zettel (DarcieWilde) | 28 comments Carol ♛ Type, Oh Queen! ♛ wrote: "Hi Sarah!

Thanks for making a copy of A Useful Woman (Rosalind Thorne Mysteries #1) by Darcie Wilde available. I really love that cover! Do you get any input to the cover art or approval of the artist?"


No. I didn't. In fact, I confess, I didn't like it at first, but it grew on me. And I ADORE the cover for the 2nd book, A Purely Private Matter. I'll see if I can download it. If not, you can see it at www.darciewilderomance.com.


message 14: by Sarah (last edited Oct 20, 2016 10:39AM) (new)

Sarah Zettel (DarcieWilde) | 28 comments Confession time. I've been reading the book discussion. And you guys are making me blush...But, somebody asked were there really women journalists during the Regency? Yes, there were. Writing was one of the few ways a woman could support her family when it came down to it, and women commonly did several different kinds. A major one was actually translation work. Since modern languages were a gentile accomplishment, a woman might be fluent enough in French and/or Italian to translate texts of interest to an English audience, such as works on contemporary art, or ancient architecture, etc. which were then published, with or without attribution in various periodicals of the time. But women did also write for ladies magazines, and the ladies newspapers, but they also got the job of writing content thought most interesting to women readers in the papers expected to be read by the entire household. There were at the time a _lot_ of newspapers and they needed a _lot_ of copy. And since it was something that could be done under a discreet veil, women were not as thoroughly excluded, although they were paid less (oh, surprise!) and not given "serious" assignments (again, oh surprise!)


Carol She's So Novel꧁꧂ Sarah wrote: " And I ADORE the cover for the 2nd book, A Purely Private Matter.

Ha! I'm quick! I had already looked on your site! It is a pretty cover but not that Regency looking. The plot synopsis sounds sounds really intriguing!


message 16: by Sarah (new)

Sarah Zettel (DarcieWilde) | 28 comments Carol ♛ Type, Oh Queen! ♛ wrote: "Sarah wrote: " And I ADORE the cover for the 2nd book, A Purely Private Matter.

Ha! I'm quick! I had already looked on your site! It is a pretty cover but not that Regency looking. The plot synop..."


Yeah, it's not Regency looking at all, which is part of what put me off about the first one. But, that look also keeps it from being mistaken for a genre romance, IMHO. Glad you find the plot intrigining sounding. I had a world of fun with it.


message 17: by Sarah (new)

Sarah Zettel (DarcieWilde) | 28 comments Further note on women's writing in or near the Regency period. If you're interested in the process, and the difficulties, of tracking these women down, I highly, highly HIGHLY recommend this blog: https://blogs.kent.ac.uk/ladys-magazine/ It's an analysis of the contents of The Lady's Magazine which was a popular periodical from the period.


Carol She's So Novel꧁꧂ Sarah thanks for all the background reading information you have given us! I'll be trying to track down Almacks for sure.
"
That was inspired- finding there were real "Rosalinds." it must be hard finding a new twist for the Regency genre.

& I stand corrected about Regency woman journalists. :)


message 19: by Sarah (new)

Sarah Zettel (DarcieWilde) | 28 comments Carol ♛ Type, Oh Queen! ♛ wrote: "Sarah thanks for all the background reading information you have given us! I'll be trying to track down Almacks for sure.
"
That was inspired- finding there were real "Rosalinds." it must be hard f..."


Carol: Google Books has it: https://books.google.com/books/about/...

I do warn you, there is a reason JA's work has survived and none of the "silver fork" novels have. This piece is dense, twisting and shows little of the polish and plot of the modern novel that starts with Austen and comes to its fruition with the Brontes and Dickens. _But_ if you are interested in the period, it's worth the wade. At least I think so, but I am clearly a Regency Nerd.

Re: women journalists. Part of the problem with identifying their work is not only that so much was published anonymously or pseudononymously, is that many of them wrote periodically, or part time. Women wrote when times got lean, and stopped when they got better. They wrote before they got married, and then stopped when marriage and kids came along. As freelancers, they were more frequently generalists, like Alice, rather than specialists. They'd do some gossip, some poetry, some translation, some fiction, whatever they could get whenever they could get it. So, while it's easy to see that women wrote, slapping labels on them is trickier.


Carol She's So Novel꧁꧂ Ha! I'm a Regency nerd too & I usually sandwich my non fiction with fiction so that I don't get bogged down.

I'm wondering how you feel about your publishers putting Jane Austen inspired on the back of your novel. For me, it doesn'tgive enough credit to you having a fresh voice.


message 21: by Sarah (new)

Sarah Zettel (DarcieWilde) | 28 comments Sarah wrote: " Carol ♛ Type, Oh Queen! ♛ wrote: "Sarah thanks for all the background reading information you have given us! I'll be trying to track down Almacks for sure.
"
That was inspired- finding there were ..."


Well, as a writer and a reader, I cannot exactly _complain_ about being compared to JA. But, the fact of the matter is, the cover of a book is a commercial for the book, so the publisher has to pack as much attention grabbing information into a limited space as possible. The name JA grabs attention and engenders a feeling of familiarity. The more accurate phrase "Inspired by Marianne Spencer Stanhope, Catherine Gore and the writers of the Silver Fork novels," would engender a lot of head-scratching.


message 22: by Janet (new)

Janet C. (goodreadscomjanetveil) Hello Sarah/Darcie!

I really enjoyed the book. I'm a huge fan of British classics and of British murder mystery, so this was a fun way to put them together. I was a bit apprehensive getting the book because I've read a few Jane Austen spinoff books and I worry that they will mar my beloved Jane Austen characters, so it was with relief that I found Rosalind tucked into her own little regency world.

Rosalind really resonated with me. As a newly single female going through a rough patch of restarting my life, Rosalind's drive to carry on and make the best of her situation was heartening.

I am fascinated by the way different authors/artists work and would love to know about your habits and daily rituals. Do you go for walks to brainstorm, hold regular writing hours, work in your pajamas, get up early or stay up late, write a lot in a few days or spread it out over a period of time? ...anything you might want to share :)


message 23: by Sarah (new)

Sarah Zettel (DarcieWilde) | 28 comments Janet wrote: "Hello Sarah/Darcie!

I really enjoyed the book. I'm a huge fan of British classics and of British murder mystery, so this was a fun way to put them together. I was a bit apprehensive getting the b..."


So glad you enjoyed! As for my writing, I have regular working hours. Most weekdays I am at my "office" which is a co-working space, from about 8 to about 4. I drink large amounts of coffee, leavened with good tea. I am also a big believer in the "plot walk," that is heading into the outdoors in some direction and keeping on going until the problem solves itself.


message 24: by SarahC, Austen Votary & Mods' Asst. (last edited Oct 20, 2016 02:39PM) (new)

SarahC (sarahcarmack) | 1473 comments Mod
Sarah wrote: "Sarah wrote: " Carol ♛ Type, Oh Queen! ♛ wrote: "Sarah thanks for all the background reading information you have given us! I'll be trying to track down Almacks for sure.
"
That was inspired- findi..."


Welcome Sarah Z to this discussion and to JA Group! I have been out of pocket today so am enjoying the things you have posted already. This comment about your book covers made me start smiling -- JA group, I think we are fortunate to have such a good writer commenting here ....who has a gift of wit as well as some serious research skills.

I like that a "Rosalind" was among the research documents you found and you decided to bring her to life again. I have done primary research and I understand your experience in finding slim historical evidence for the workings of society -- you have done of great job of putting together the puzzle pieces to show us this high society world.

I love the period but have very little knowledge of the "ton" and society's machine. Were there other "institutions" or influencers that were runners up to Almack's? If you found yourself left out of Almack's was there hope that you might gain some status elsewhere?


message 25: by Louise Sparrow (new)

Louise Sparrow (louisex) | 301 comments Hi Sarah, thank you for the book copies, it's very much appreciated.

I haven't had a chance to join in the conversations yet, life got in the way and I'm still reading, but I wanted to say I'm really enjoying it.


message 26: by Sarah (new)

Sarah Zettel (DarcieWilde) | 28 comments "I like that a "Rosalind" was among the research documents you found and you decided to bring her to life again. I have done primary research and I understand your experience in finding slim historical evidence for the workings of society -- you have done of great job of putting together the puzzle pieces to show us this high society world."

This is where reading the novels comes in. They are great for showing up details that the period were actually concerned about, like the difficulties of travel and inns at the time.

"I love the period but have very little knowledge of the "ton" and society's machine. Were there other "institutions" or influencers that were runners up to Almack's? If you found yourself left out of Almack's was there hope that you might gain some status elsewhere?"

As far as I've been able to figure out, Almack's was unique. The irony however, was in the women, the "Patronesses" who ran the club and exercised absolute authority over who got in. While they were all upper crust, they were all in some way connected with scandal. Sarah Child Villiers, Lady Jersey, for instance, was the daughter in law of one of the Prince Regent's mistresses (Francis Villiers) who was instrumental in breaking up his marriage with the Princess of Wales. Emily Cowper was the daughter of Caroline Lamb (you know the woman who was even crazier than Byron?). They were in short, all a little off despite their money and position, and so weren't getting invited to the best parties. So they very deliberately took the reins in what had been a failing gambling club and with concentrated effort and malice aforethought made it into the most exclusive party in London and themselves into the most powerful women in society. It was, in it's way, a stroke of incredible genius.


message 27: by Sarah (new)

Sarah Zettel (DarcieWilde) | 28 comments Louise Sparrow wrote: "Hi Sarah, thank you for the book copies, it's very much appreciated.

I haven't had a chance to join in the conversations yet, life got in the way and I'm still reading, but I wanted to say I'm rea..."


Thank you!


message 28: by Abigail (new)

Abigail Bok (regency_reader) | 491 comments I love your comments about Pride and Prejudice! So true. And I’m impressed with the amount—and the type—of research you did, and it really shows in the book. So many authors who do only “scholarly” research wind up throwing in facts to show off or because they find them randomly interesting and hope the reader will as well. Taking the time to read popular fiction of the day is a much richer way to go about it, and perhaps makes it easier to incorporate the facts more seamlessly. I was interested to see where you got the idea for Rosalind! It’s so often a chance factoid that sends a writer down the rabbit hole of creativity.

I take your point about the comparison to Jane Austen on the back cover, even though I’m a weirdo and “Inspired by Marianne Spencer Stanhope, Catherine Gore and the writers of the Silver Fork novels” would have gotten my attention!

Interesting to learn about the female journalists of the day. Another writer of Regency mysteries, S. K. Rizzolo, has a heroine who does some writing for the papers as well, and I was never sure how accurate that might be.

May I ask if you have an agent, and if so, who? Getting published by Berkley is pretty rad!


message 29: by Sarah (new)

Sarah Zettel (DarcieWilde) | 28 comments Abigail wrote: "I love your comments about Pride and Prejudice! So true. And I’m impressed with the amount—and the type—of research you did, and it really shows in the book. So many authors who do only “scholarly”..."

One of the big advantages to writing about Regency England is I can actually _read_ the primary sources. I've only got the one language, so that's a little limiting. I am represented by The McCarthy Agency, and have been for (mumble) years.


Carol She's So Novel꧁꧂ With Almacks I think about modern day fashionable clubs. I'm a New Zealander & I remember being up in Auckland & driving through Ponsonby. Some restaurants & clubs would have mile long line ups outside, others would be empty. With restaurants it can be the food, but often it is what is trendy & what is not!


message 31: by Emilia (new)

Emilia Barnes | 259 comments Wah, I missed most of this discussion! So informative, though, thank you Darcie :)


message 32: by Sarah (new)

Sarah Zettel (DarcieWilde) | 28 comments Carol: The names have changed, the people haven't.

Emilia: You haven't missed it! We're scheduled to go on through Saturday.


message 33: by SarahC, Austen Votary & Mods' Asst. (new)

SarahC (sarahcarmack) | 1473 comments Mod
Your comments on Almack's make the whole thing an even more fascinating story. This was a tough group accustomed to the world of intimidation it sounds like. That makes my mind jump immediately to the scene between Harkness and Casselmain. p 272. which I found interesting as a character observation - it really added interest in the story I thought -- Harkness thinks to himself, "Either the man was not used to this level of social deception, or he was not expert at it. He'd been the second son, hadn't he?" The character Harkness seems to know pretty commonly the high level of behind the scenes stuff that is capable at this social level. People willing to do things to create their own pathway.

This also leads me naturally to this discussion of Casselmain in our group read. Not strictly speaking for everyone, but maybe we don't know what to make of him. I know he may be a character you need to hold back on, but would you be willing to share a tidbit or two of your thoughts on Casselmain? Was he inspired by any particular direction?


message 34: by Emilia (new)

Emilia Barnes | 259 comments Whoop whoop there's still time! :)

If you are going to speak of Casselmain, can you also say something about Harkness?

Was he based on any one in particular, like a historical figure you researched or a composite of people maybe?

Oh and just out of curiosity, which is your favourite Jane Austen novel?


message 35: by Sarah (new)

Sarah Zettel (DarcieWilde) | 28 comments Casselmain and Harkness...ah, I do love me a study in contrasts. Devon has been a tough nut to crack, and it seems that that has shown. He is a man who is actively struggling. Like Rosalind, he is constrained by his position, even though that position is supposed to make him lord of all he surveys. His relationship with his brother, and the way he got the title have left they're marks on him. He is in love with Rosalind, but he does not necessarily understand her.

Adam is a much more straightforward person. He likes what he does. He believes in it. It allows him to contribute to the support of a large and boisterous family. He likes a lot of the men he works with. He finds Rosalind...fascinating. He certainly enjoys being around her, although she frustrates him. He is, however, a lady's man. He likes women, and if he is falling in love with Rosalind, it's not going to be a straight shot, which we'll see some of in the next book...

SPOILER ALERT! There is not going to be a love triangle, at least not in the traditional sense. But there is going to be some...back and forth, let's say.

P.S. As for my favorite JA, I think it's a toss up between Sense & Sensibility and Northhanger Abbey.


message 36: by Abigail (new)

Abigail Bok (regency_reader) | 491 comments Interesting choices for JA faves! Don’t often see those two named. I was a Persuasion gal for many years, but have moved a little toward Mansfield Park—another road less traveled. But who am I kidding? It’s Pride and Prejudice I read the most! And I dream of a complete version of The Watsons.


message 37: by Sarah (new)

Sarah Zettel (DarcieWilde) | 28 comments Everybody loves P&P, and we all thank Colin Farrell for giving us a Mr. Darcy for the ages. But I like S&S because you don't often see a book about women's honor that doesn't involve fending off sexual advances. Eleanore is an honorable character. She is given a confidence, and no matter what the cost, she will keep it. She would rather have Edward behave honorably than marry him in a dishonorable fashion. This is not something you see a whole lot. Jane Eyre is very much Eleanore's literary granddaughter. NA is just great because I am a book nerd and I have geeked out over books in exactly the fashion described, and yes, okay, skewered, in there.


message 38: by SarahC, Austen Votary & Mods' Asst. (new)

SarahC (sarahcarmack) | 1473 comments Mod
Thanks for giving us those insights on the two male characters. Exactly what I was hoping for -- enough to keep me pondering and thinking about them! I think I mentioned before that I like that they are less the smoldering type -- your way of introducing them in book one makes me feel I could actually meet either of them on the street. Male leads or prominent male characters often seem just too fairytale or storybook for my tastes -- fun to think of them like that for 10 minutes at a time, but not so good in the long run.

I will say too, for so many reasons, I find Sense and Sensi to be one of my favorite novels also -- outside of the Austen collection as well. Elinor Dashwood, and several of the characters, are not usually given enough credit. It is an emotionally tumultuous story. I don't often read through the entire book--often just parts --, but find myself thinking about this character of Elinor and what she goes through. How confined she was by her circumstance but what a strong woman she was. The story has been portrayed beautifully in film, but the reading of this -- every word-- is a necessity. The story is so much more than immediately meets the eye. The dilemma she faces with Edward's relationship may be hard for us to understand in the modern world, but it translates to any difficult, extremely personal situation any of us might face, I think.


message 39: by Sarah (new)

Sarah Zettel (DarcieWilde) | 28 comments Elinor's struggle is the struggle to be a good human. She is offered serious temptation. She is in love with a man who loves her, they are separated by a series of unfair circumstances and not nice people. And the standards of decency by which they live. It would be so easy to break the standards. But what would they have left? The telling line is when Elinor finally snaps and shouts back at Marianne "Would you have him treat Lucy even worse that Willoughby treated you?"


message 40: by Abigail (new)

Abigail Bok (regency_reader) | 491 comments That’s one of the things I love about Jane Austen—the strong thread of ethics running through all the books! Even Catherine Morland learns a few ethical lessons. The focus on ethics takes the comedy so much deeper.


message 41: by SarahC, Austen Votary & Mods' Asst. (new)

SarahC (sarahcarmack) | 1473 comments Mod
I wanted to thank Darcie Wilde (and Sarah Zettel) for joining us for a fun and interesting discussion of her captivating mystery story. I will be wanting to see Rosalind through more cases after this. Darcie, also thanks for sharing your research stories -- we are a group who appreciates finding those cool, 19th century details -- you are clearly a writing AND research artiste.


message 42: by Emilia (new)

Emilia Barnes | 259 comments Yes, thank you Darcie!! This was so much fun! And thank you SarahC for organising this!


message 43: by SarahC, Austen Votary & Mods' Asst. (new)

SarahC (sarahcarmack) | 1473 comments Mod
You are welcome!


message 44: by Abigail (new)

Abigail Bok (regency_reader) | 491 comments Absolutely, thank you, Darcie/Sarah, for first making this group read possible and then graciously participating! One of the highlights of my October.


message 45: by Abigail (new)

Abigail Bok (regency_reader) | 491 comments And I forgot to mention SarahC as well, for all the work she put in.


message 46: by SarahC, Austen Votary & Mods' Asst. (new)

SarahC (sarahcarmack) | 1473 comments Mod
You are welcome; I enjoyed it all.


Carol She's So Novel꧁꧂ I really enjoyed the discussion - thanks to both Sarahs. :)


message 48: by Sarah (new)

Sarah Zettel (DarcieWilde) | 28 comments Thanks, everybody. I had so much fun, I'm joining the group!


message 49: by QNPoohBear (new)

QNPoohBear | 647 comments I missed most of the Q & A .... I was at JASNA with 800 other Janeites! I wanted to chime in and say as an archivist, I really appreciate primary source research. So many authors just copy others who copy Georgette Heyer. Even she didn't get all of her facts right but we forgive her because she didn't have access to the sources we have now and of course because she was an incomparable writer!

I'd like to know at what point you decided who the murderer was. I never guessed until just before Rosalind figured it out and usually in Regency mysteries, the villain becomes obvious pretty early on.


message 50: by Sarah (new)

Sarah Zettel (DarcieWilde) | 28 comments It was fairly early on, actually. Sometimes, I don't know until I've got most of the book at least structured, but that time, it was pretty darned obvious to me going in.


« previous 1
back to top