World, Writing, Wealth discussion

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All Things Writing & Publishing > Are we going about it all wrong? Writing specifically for the digital platform.

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Tara Woods Turner | 2063 comments Check out this thought provoking article on the differences between reading traditional print books and reading books on ereaders. Will it change the way you write your next novel?

http://bookmarketingtools.com/blog/wr...


message 2: by Jen Pattison (new)

Jen Pattison | 409 comments Firstly, thanks for the link Tara as I hadn't come across that blog before, it looks very useful. I write non-fiction and I don't think that I would have approached my book any differently (the ebook and paperback are exactly the same), but I'm planning my second to be an ebook only so yes, I probably will take heed of this advice.

I do find reading an ebook to be a very different experience from a paper version. Paper is my preference, and I find the points made rather sad - 'keep it short and simple', is this literature for the Twitter age? Shouldn't reading stretch and challenge the mind?

I did see a study a few years ago about how reading does alter the mind's processes, they had studied communities where people hadn't learned to read. Apparently their facial recognition was much greater than in literate communities, maybe reading and having info at our fingertips deteriorates our memory processes?


message 3: by Annie (new)

Annie Arcane (anniearcane) @Miss Tara: Ooooh, thank you for the link!!!

Okay, I didn't do this for my book because I'm already the queen of breaking things into too many paragraphs *grins sheepishly* However, I often tell the other authors (when they ask! haha!!) on my online publishing platform to be cognizant of what their chapters/stories will look like on all devices. Because many people read on their phones nowadays and a longer paragraph looks like a wall-o-text, eh?

@Miss Jen: Yes, I totally agree the points are a bit cringeworthy for a writer. Personally, I find it a bit counter-intuitive to edit this way. Buuuut...

I figure the world's moving on with or without us. Annnnd I vote for with *smirks*

Hugs,
Ann


Tara Woods Turner | 2063 comments Jen
Really excited to hear from another non-fictioner - excellent points!

Annie
I hoped like heck you'd chime in on this :) Unlike groupon eyelash extenstion deals you never disappoint.


message 5: by Annie (new)

Annie Arcane (anniearcane) Tara wrote: "Annie
I hoped like heck you'd chime in on this :) Unlike groupon eyelash extenstion deals you never disappoint."


1. You can count on me, ma'am! I always got ur back!! But...
2. What did I say about making me pee my pants???


message 6: by Jen Pattison (last edited Jul 30, 2016 10:14AM) (new)

Jen Pattison | 409 comments Annie wrote: "I figure the world's moving on with or without us.."

I agree with that, not that I like what I see. Everywhere seems so dumbed-down, appalling spelling and grammar to be found on the websites of the upmarket press and the BBC now. Websites seem to be designed for people with the attention span of a gnat. I dread to think how this will unfold in the future.

I have worked with a few young graduates whose spelling and grammar were awful - one was doing a Masters in her spare time and she even got basic words like their/there wrong, and another was an Oxford graduate!


message 7: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 15783 comments I'm not sure the distinction is really btw ereaders & paper, but rather modern approach (i.e. Adaptation to readership expectation) vs traditional.
I'm for a snappy style anyway, but not sure into simplistic. I may not like all the tendencies, but Jeri sounds right in her analysis


message 8: by Tim (last edited Jul 30, 2016 10:28AM) (new)

Tim Rees | 732 comments I disagree with the article. I read my Kindle exactly the same as I read a paper book. I don't engage a different part of my brain.

Besides, I don't write for readers. In my mind I'm writing the film, but the first and maybe the second draft is in novel format.


message 9: by Jen Pattison (new)

Jen Pattison | 409 comments I agree with you about a snappy style Nik, it is often engaging and fun. What I don't like is a shallow approach though I do often like a happy medium between the two as dense, convoluted text is too hard to follow.

I did think about the use of white space when writing my book to make the look of it attractive, and to keep long paragraphs to a minimum, though they were sometimes necessary. I think that good use of white space looks good in a paper version as well as an ebook.


message 10: by Annie (new)

Annie Arcane (anniearcane) Umm. I might be going too off-topic here. If so, somebody slap me and I'll make another thread...

Font choice is something else to consider. It makes a huge difference, imho. Some are better suited to quick dialogue exchanges. Others better suited to longer paragraphs. Yes, yes, I realize that readers choose their own fonts on their ereaders. But I still keep this in mind for folks reading on their laptops or computers.

I mean, even on iBooks and Kindle (I use both) I choose different fonts when reading different books. Or else my eyeballs start to hate me. And if those buggers stage a coup, I'm gonna have issues...

And yes, Miss Jen! Totes with you on the use of white space, especially for trad print!!

Hugs,
Ann


message 11: by Alex (new)

Alex (asato) Jen wrote: "I agree with you about a snappy style Nik, it is often engaging and fun. What I don't like is a shallow approach though I do often like a happy medium between the two as dense, convoluted text is t..."

a reasonable balance is what is required. your intended audience should also factor into the equation. for example, YA might tend towards a smaller form factor (although my middle-school-age daughter hardly reads the kindle and instead continues to check out palette loads of hardcopy from the library every couple of weeks.)

i have heard that shorter paragraphs make ebooks more readable.

although i've heard people theorize about the easy access of knowledge on the internet adversely affecting our ability to memorize things, i don't believe there's been any definitive conclusion. it is true that comprehension is lower, but it depends on the complexity of the concept. if you're just looking for a fact, "how many given names begin with the letter "A" in the English language?", then learning is not impaired and would be, in fact, increased b/c learning that fact is in context. a good book on learning is Why Don't Students Like School?: A Cognitive Scientist Answers Questions About How the Mind Works and What It Means for the Classroom (which I bought).


message 12: by Annie (new)

Annie Arcane (anniearcane) Jen wrote: "one was doing a Masters in her spare time and she even got basic words like their/there wrong"

*blank stare*


Tara Woods Turner | 2063 comments *gets a key lime macaron for Annie* *changes mind and hands her a baby wipe*


Tara Woods Turner | 2063 comments Jen
Exactly! This is the stigma we have to overcome as indies.


Tara Woods Turner | 2063 comments Since the average reader only consumes 12 books a year I think it's fun and interesting to evaluate these types of questions.

Annie
Font choice is actually very important, I've read. I use Garamond.


message 16: by Annie (last edited Jul 30, 2016 11:24AM) (new)

Annie Arcane (anniearcane) @Miss Tara: Hahaha! I was just about to ask you!! About your font choice, not the baby wipe. But I'll take both ^_~

My general rule of thumb for reading:

Non-fiction & longer paragraphs = Garamond or Palatino ☚ Such a "pretty" font!!
Fiction & shorter paragraphs = Georgia

Of course, there's no absolute answer. And there's a bazillion alternatives. I ALWAYS stick to serif, though. Sans serif and my brain are not the best of buddies...

Hugs,
Ann


Tara Woods Turner | 2063 comments Palatino...thanks for the suggestion. What font did you use for your name header on cover 2 of your book option? It is gorgeous!


message 18: by Annie (new)

Annie Arcane (anniearcane) @Miss Tara: Do you mean the author name on my new cover? Or current one?

Current cover: Sell Your Soul
New cover: Umm. Lemme ask and get back to you? I didn't make it myself hahahaha!!

Hugs,
Ann


Tara Woods Turner | 2063 comments From yesterday's thread - opaque vs translucent, cover 2 with your name across the top. Stunning.


message 20: by Annie (new)

Annie Arcane (anniearcane) @Miss Tara: Well... *blushes* ...thank you, ma'am!

I just asked. Shall let you know as soon as I hear back ^_~


message 21: by Annie (new)

Annie Arcane (anniearcane) UPDATE for Miss Tara: We *think* it's Baskerville. Which makes sense since I've used that font for other stuff. Shall double check in the next few days...


Tara Woods Turner | 2063 comments thank youuuu :)


message 23: by Annie (new)

Annie Arcane (anniearcane) My pleasure, ma'am! *gentlemanly bow* I swear, I was meant to be a man...


Tara Woods Turner | 2063 comments XX YY XY? *curtseys*


message 25: by Annie (new)

Annie Arcane (anniearcane) More like XXXY? ^_~


message 26: by Annie (new)

Annie Arcane (anniearcane) Tara wrote: "What font did you use for your name header on cover 2 of your book option? It is gorgeous!"

My final answer: YuMincho Semi-Bold

It was originally Baskerville but kept on changing cuz I'm a nitpicky brat ^_^

Hugs,
Ann


Tara Woods Turner | 2063 comments Woot! TY :)


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