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Teymour Shahabi
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Writing Advice & Discussion > Do YOU say TOWARD or TOWARDS? (For My Book's Final Edit!)

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message 1: by Teymour (new)

Teymour Shahabi (teymourshahabi) | 29 comments Hello fellow authors / readers!

I'm just about to release my debut novel, a self-published young adult mystery titled "The Secret Billionaire..." And I have one final editing question for all of you! Do you say "toward" or "towards?" I'm getting all kinds of conflicting responses from online references -- and my own instincts -- and so I thought I'd ask the only people who matter: other authors / readers!

The situation explained at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ME_Nn...

Please let me know!

Teymour Shahabi


message 2: by Robin (new)

Robin Hill (robinhill) Toward is primarily American, towards is British. But, both seem to be acceptable as long as you're consistent.


message 3: by Anastasia (new)

Anastasia (booksteainsanity) If your book is in first person: What nationality are your characters? If they're British, towards would be the acceptable form. But, if they're American or Canadian, toward is the acceptable form.

If your book is in third person: I'd just pick one and stay consistent with it, but keep the setting of your book in mind. (If your book takes place in the US, use the American spelling, and so on.)


message 4: by Barbara (new)

Barbara Tarn (barbaragtarn) Doesn't matter as long as you're consistent! :)


message 5: by Martin (new)

Martin Rinehart I use
http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/educ...
and
http://grammarist.com/spelling/toward...
for these types of questions. On this one, they agree with the above posts, with the first (formerly Grammar Girl) leaning toward 'towards' if your English is British.


message 6: by Barbara (new)

Barbara Tarn (barbaragtarn) I grew up with British English and wrote it without the S, then my word processor spellchecker, when selecting American English put the S in... So I guess everybody is still confused about it! ;)
Hence the only rule is: pick a spelling and be consistent! :D


message 7: by Teymour (last edited Jul 23, 2016 01:58PM) (new)

Teymour Shahabi (teymourshahabi) | 29 comments Teymour wrote: "Hello fellow authors / readers!

I'm just about to release my debut novel, a self-published young adult mystery titled "The Secret Billionaire..." And I have one final editing question for all of y..."


Robin wrote: "Toward is primarily American, towards is British. But, both seem to be acceptable as long as you're consistent."

Anastasia wrote: "If your book is in first person: What nationality are your characters? If they're British, towards would be the acceptable form. But, if they're American or Canadian, toward is the acceptable form...."

Barbara wrote: "Doesn't matter as long as you're consistent! :)"

Thanks so much for the replies! Sounds like consistency is the most important rule... I find myself saying "towards" in life, despite having a strong American accent?!


message 8: by Teymour (new)

Teymour Shahabi (teymourshahabi) | 29 comments Barbara wrote: "I grew up with British English and wrote it without the S, then my word processor spellchecker, when selecting American English put the S in... So I guess everybody is still confused about it! ;)
H..."


AAahhh I thought technology was supposed to help us?!? ;)


message 9: by Barbara (last edited Jul 24, 2016 07:22AM) (new)

Barbara Tarn (barbaragtarn) I know... but I realized that sometimes grammar rules change!
I grew up with British English because that's what they teach at Italian schools. But I also lived in French-speaking countries (who also teach British English), so I was baffled when my spellchecker underlined the spelling.
What I mean, though, is that regarding for example Italian and French (that I learned at the same time being an Italian child going to French schools) I had some rules regarding accents (not present in English).
Thirty years later those rules have become the exact opposite in both languages (I had learned that you used 3 accents in French and only one in Italian, now there's only 1 in French and 2 in Italian for some reason).
So that's what may have happened with toward/towards and the spellcheckers are not updated? Just guessing... ;)


message 10: by Emma (last edited Jul 24, 2016 07:44AM) (new)

Emma Jaye | 145 comments It's not tricky. Towards is British, toward is American.
If you use colour and defence in your manuscript, use towards.
If you use color and defense, use toward.


message 11: by Teymour (new)

Teymour Shahabi (teymourshahabi) | 29 comments Emma wrote: "It's not tricky. Towards is British, toward is American.
If you use colour and defence in your manuscript, use towards.
If you use color and defense, use toward."


I realize this may be wacky, but what if I used color, defense, and towards?! My own language!! Mouahahaha


message 12: by Teymour (new)

Teymour Shahabi (teymourshahabi) | 29 comments Barbara wrote: "I know... but I realized that sometimes grammar rules change!
I grew up with British English because that's what they teach at Italian schools. But I also lived in French-speaking countries (who al..."


Je pleure encore la perte de l'accent circonflexe!! :)


message 13: by Barbara (new)

Barbara Tarn (barbaragtarn) Emma wrote: "It's not tricky. Towards is British, toward is American.
If you use colour and defence in your manuscript, use towards.
If you use color and defense, use toward."


That's not what I was taught 40 years ago, that's what I'm saying...


message 14: by Emma (new)

Emma Jaye | 145 comments You'll have self important grammar grumps pausing for a fraction of a second, feeling a little superior for having caught you out, and moving on.
It really doesn't matter because the vast majority of readers won't notice and even if they do, they won't care.


message 15: by Barbara (new)

Barbara Tarn (barbaragtarn) Teymour wrote: "Je pleure encore la perte de l'accent circonflexe!! :)"

et moi aussi (+ les complications en italien, gahh!)


message 16: by Barbara (new)

Barbara Tarn (barbaragtarn) Emma wrote: "It really doesn't matter because the vast majority of readers won't notice and even if they do, they won't care."

totally and absolutely true! :)


message 17: by Teymour (new)

Teymour Shahabi (teymourshahabi) | 29 comments Barbara wrote: "Emma wrote: "It really doesn't matter because the vast majority of readers won't notice and even if they do, they won't care."

totally and absolutely true! :)"


LJ wrote: "In journalism, we were taught to use "toward," so that's what I do (and similarly, I use backward, forward, etc.) It may just be an AP Style thing. I agree that it doesn't really matter as long as ..."

Sounds like we all agree (on the philosophy, if not the actual spelling ;) )


message 18: by D.L (last edited Jul 27, 2016 03:21PM) (new)

D.L Jenkinson | 3 comments Essentially, both are correct. But, Americans

use 'toward,' while brits use 'towards.'


message 19: by Barbara (new)

Barbara Tarn (barbaragtarn) Doug wrote: "Essentially, both are correct. But, Americans

use 'toward,' while brits use 'towards.'"


tell that to my spellchecker! ;)


message 20: by Vic (new)

Vic (VicBeckman) | 3 comments I wasn't sure, then I read your post yesterday and over the past day paid attention to what I was saying... Definitely "towards".


message 21: by Teymour (new)

Teymour Shahabi (teymourshahabi) | 29 comments Vic_56501 wrote: "I wasn't sure, then I read your post yesterday and over the past day paid attention to what I was saying... Definitely "towards"."

Glad we agree! :) Answer at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cnb0t...


message 22: by D.L (new)

D.L Jenkinson | 3 comments Barbara wrote: "Emma wrote: "It really doesn't matter because the vast majority of readers won't notice and even if they do, they won't care."

totally and absolutely true! :)"


It matters to editors and publishers.


message 23: by Katie-bree (last edited Oct 11, 2016 04:19AM) (new)

Katie-bree | 22 comments Robin wrote: "Toward is primarily American, towards is British. But, both seem to be acceptable as long as you're consistent."

Hi, I am an editor and Robin (and I am sure many others too ) is correct. Toward is the American style while Towards is generally British. It is becoming increasingly interchangeable however as long as the same style is kept consistent throughout. Good luck!


Roughseasinthemed | 263 comments I use toward in American editing and towards for British. But yes, keep it consistent.


message 25: by Teymour (new)

Teymour Shahabi (teymourshahabi) | 29 comments Roughseasinthemed wrote: "I use toward in American editing and towards for British. But yes, keep it consistent."

Thank you! And what's the story behind your cool username?!


message 26: by Rhonda (new)

Rhonda | 16 comments Toward.


Roughseasinthemed | 263 comments Hi Teymour

It's my blogname. I live on the Med which sometimes gets quite rough. Similarly not all my blog posts are sweetness and light. :D


message 28: by Dakota (new)

Dakota Rayne | 199 comments Mod
Traditional grammar rules say you should use toward when referring to a direction and towards when in relation to something or someone. Ie: We are going toward the south. This quiz counts towards your grade.


message 29: by Teymour (new)

Teymour Shahabi (teymourshahabi) | 29 comments Dakota wrote: "Traditional grammar rules say you should use toward when referring to a direction and towards when in relation to something or someone. Ie: We are going toward the south. This quiz counts towards y..."

I'd never heard this rule! Thanks for educating me :)


message 30: by Kevis (new)

Kevis Hendrickson (kevishendrickson) | 130 comments Dakota wrote: "Traditional grammar rules say you should use toward when referring to a direction and towards when in relation to something or someone. Ie: We are going toward the south. This quiz counts towards y..."

Sometimes I think the grammarists don't have anything better to do than to come up with silly rules. Why fix what isn't broken? :(


message 31: by Dakota (new)

Dakota Rayne | 199 comments Mod
haha. I don't know. That's just a very old rule that probably isn't taught to the modern generations or in modern schools anymore. Grammar and language change over time. If you read books from a hundred years ago, you will see different words and word usage. I mean, nowadays we write with idk, ttyl, j/k and lol. Who needs grammar, right? I'm kidding, but I hope you get the sentiment.


message 32: by Kevis (new)

Kevis Hendrickson (kevishendrickson) | 130 comments I sure do get it. Right along with a serious migraine, lol.


message 33: by Teymour (new)

Teymour Shahabi (teymourshahabi) | 29 comments Kevis wrote: "I sure do get it. Right along with a serious migraine, lol."

Dakota wrote: "haha. I don't know. That's just a very old rule that probably isn't taught to the modern generations or in modern schools anymore. Grammar and language change over time. If you read books from a hu..."

Haha as long as I don't start peppering pages with ttyl and j/k, I think I'll be fine :)


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