Save Our Cozies Readathon discussion

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Readathon Hourly Challenges > Hour 20 Challenge

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message 1: by wonderwomand (new)

wonderwomand | 163 comments how do we post the title and link? do we copy and paste?


message 2: by wonderwomand (new)

wonderwomand | 163 comments Thank you. Let's see if I can copy and paste.

https://wdl.mcdaniel.edu/node/5


message 3: by wonderwomand (new)

wonderwomand | 163 comments The title is The Corked Leg publshed in Burke's Gentleman Quarterly in 1838.


message 4: by wonderwomand (last edited Jul 16, 2016 04:14PM) (new)

wonderwomand | 163 comments This sketch is translated from the French language.

I skimmed the story. The short story is about an inmate of a chateau who is the owner of the cork leg, hence the title of the story. The language is complicated so I will need to read the story carefully.


message 5: by wonderwomand (new)

wonderwomand | 163 comments Ronnie wrote: "Diana wrote: "This sketch is translated from the French language.

I skimmed the story. The story is a narrative about an old smuggler who lived in France before the revolution."

How was it?"


I will need to read the short story again. It looks like the owner of the cork leg was an inmate at a chateau. Was also involved in a duel. The other person claimed that he did not hurt him since he already had a cork leg.


message 6: by Kathleen (new)

Kathleen | 30 comments The Dead Man’s Inn
Sylvanus Cobb, Jr.
https://wdl.mcdaniel.edu/node/60
I would recommend it.
A gentleman was killed in the old west and the means to find who did it was quite interesting.


message 7: by Debbie (new)

Debbie Riley | 23 comments I read - The Murder in the Room. This was about about several guys that gambled together and one night they all gambled but one and lost all the money. The guy who didn't go got mad so the other hit him in the head and killed him. He was trying to decide what to do with the body when his friends showed up, so he hid him in the closet. The guys decided to shoot at the closet and one of the guys mentioned if their friend was hiding in the closet. So of course they opened the door and their was the dead friend and it happened to be the brother of one of them. So now they think they all killed him when it was just one of them.
One way to get away with murder. Not a bad story.


message 8: by Nancy (last edited Jul 16, 2016 04:43PM) (new)

Nancy | 25 comments I read "A Story of Circumstantial Evidence" by Danuiel O'Connell. I enjoyed it. I found it to be somehwhat humorous. The story involves the fight between 2 men that happens over a day with the result being the death of one of them. I will leave it to read the story and find out the ending


message 9: by Jackie (last edited Jul 16, 2016 05:00PM) (new)

Jackie I read The Cork Leg. It was written in 1838 and it was amusing.

A policeman was trying to find the man with the cork leg that was in a duel with another man. The household helped to hide the man in a unique way. It was a pleasant read.

link


message 10: by Terri (new)

Terri Crossley | 35 comments Mr. Snickers Misadventures
Poor Mr. Snickers was an honest man who had always dreamed of going to New York City! He was very young when he went and had dreamed of going back every since! He finally got his chance and headed onto the boat to take him to his dream. He would wake up every day and watch the city get closer and his dream becoming real! On the day he was going to finally reach his destination he was on deck waiting patiently for the boat to land! A fine gentlemen screamed that his wallet was stolen and he had been robbed! The magistrate was called and one by one everyone was checked and the robber snuck the wallet into Mr. Snickers pants. When he was found with the wallet he declared his innocence and told them he was an honest man. While everyone embarked there was a sly detective who watch each passenger come upon land. He grabbed the real culprit and Mr. Snickers was free. He hopped the next bus home and never dreamed of leaving home again! I enjoyed it but I don't think I would really recommend it!


message 11: by Terri (new)

Terri Crossley | 35 comments Ronnie wrote: "Terri wrote: "Mr. Snickers Misadventures
Poor Mr. Snickers was an honest man who had always dreamed of going to New York City! He was very young when he went and had dreamed of going back every si..."


Yes he was an honest soul who just wanted to fulfill his dream! But I guess he realized there is no place like home!


message 12: by Karen-Leigh (new)

Karen-Leigh | 32 comments I read The Purloined Letter by Edgar A. Poe because it is so famous and yet in my 60 years of reading I have never read it so could not pass up the chance. I absolutely adored that he called the library – the book closet. That will stick in my mind. I, of course, knew the bones of the story already but the detail was fascinating. Only caveat was the last lines were in French which I could not read and so missed the full flavour.


message 13: by Jackie (new)

Jackie Karen-Leigh wrote: "I read The Purloined Letter by Edgar A. Poe because it is so famous and yet in my 60 years of reading I have never read it so could not pass up the chance. I absolutely adored that he called the li..."

Karen-Leigh,

If deadly purpose,

If it is worthy of Atreus, is worthy of Thyestes.


message 14: by Rose (new)

Rose Langley | 4 comments I read Murders in the Rue Morgue. Edgar A Poe has always been an author that I found wrote stories that keep you on the edge of your seat.

https://wdl.mcdaniel.edu/node/37


message 15: by Christie (new)

Christie (christineocheallaigh) | 26 comments I picked all three of Poe's detective stories, "The Murders in the Rue Morgue," "The Mystery of Marie Roget" and "The Purloined Letter". The first time I read these I was probably in 7th or 8th grade, and I couldn't get enough of them. Of course, I've always been a Poe fan, so that helped. :P

The parallels between his detective Dupin and Dupin's friend and narrator, and another famous detective and his friend and narrator were too much of a coincidence to pass up mentioning when I posted the links on Facebook. (Just like my favorite Marine, "I don't believe in coincidence.") I know Doyle fashioned Holmes after an old professor of his, but the fact that Holmes and Watson lived together for years, were best friends (he may have been Holmes' only friend, really, unless you count Lestrade), and that Watson was the narrator for all Holmes' adventures is obviously taken from the C. Auguste Dupin stories by Poe. And since Poe is credited as being the father of the modern-day detective story, that's not actually much of a surprise.

https://wdl.mcdaniel.edu/node/27

https://wdl.mcdaniel.edu/node/35

https://wdl.mcdaniel.edu/node/37


message 16: by Karen-Leigh (new)

Karen-Leigh | 32 comments Jackie wrote: "Karen-Leigh wrote: "I read The Purloined Letter by Edgar A. Poe because it is so famous and yet in my 60 years of reading I have never read it so could not pass up the chance. I absolutely adored t..."

Thank you so much for the translation.


message 17: by Jackie (new)

Jackie Karen-Leigh, you're welcome!


message 18: by Karen-Leigh (new)

Karen-Leigh | 32 comments Got up early to walk the dog this morning and then went back to bed for another three hours to play catch up. Then spent the last three hours emptying my mailbox. I will get to second book in Sid the Skeleton later today. It was fun yesterday except for my initial inability to use social media or upload pictures needed for challenges and my inability to pun at all and worry over where stuff I did post went when it didn't show up.


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