Mock Geisel discussion

32 views
What We Are Reading This Month > July 2016 Reads--Mock Geisel

Comments Showing 1-6 of 6 (6 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

message 1: by Jen (last edited Jul 11, 2016 07:34PM) (new)

Jen Ferry (librarygarden) | 17 comments The Thank You Book (Elephant & Piggie, #25) by Mo Willems --The Thank You Book by Mo Willems

What This Story Needs Is a Munch and a Crunch by Emma J. Virjan --What This Story Needs Is a Munch and a Crunch by Emma J. Virjan

Get a Hit, Mo! by David A. Adler --Get a Hit, Mo! by David Adler


message 2: by Jen (new)

Jen Ferry (librarygarden) | 17 comments 1. Page Turning Dynamic—plot engages reader to keep reading
2. Text—word repetition, new vocabulary added at an appropriate pace, sentence length, book length (24-96 pages)
3. Illustrations—give clues to the text, make sense with the text
4. Font—size, color, placement

Get a Hit, Mo!
By David Adler

1. Mo is excited about his baseball game. But, being the smallest and youngest on the team gives him much to worry about. Young baseball lovers will be cheering for Mo to see if he gets a hit, and having worrisome feelings right along with him in the late innings of the game. Fans of Don’t Throw It to Mo will enjoy this second installment.
2. New vocabulary is added appropriately, with baseball terminology being repeated through the story. While the sentence length can be difficult for younger readers, no sentence is longer than 2 lines (longest sentence is 10 words).
3. The illustrations not only make sense with the text, but many help decipher the baseball vocabulary. The action sequences also help us see/feel right along with Mo.
4. There is little white space on any page in this book. Some beginning readers may feel overwhelmed with the amount of text in the story. The font chosen for the italics is appropriate as well, as it shows continuity with the main text by not using a double-story a or g.


message 3: by Jen (new)

Jen Ferry (librarygarden) | 17 comments 1. Page Turning Dynamic—plot engages reader to keep reading
2. Text—word repetition, new vocabulary added at an appropriate pace, sentence length, book length (24-96 pages)
3. Illustrations—give clues to the text, make sense with the text
4. Font—size, color, placement

What This Story Needs Is a Munch and a Crunch
By Emma J. Virjan

1. The cover and title pages give us clues about potentially going on a picnic. Will the first page with a pig in a wig entice readers to continue? Will this story be humorous or will something interesting happen?
2. While new vocabulary is added, much is not repeated until the later in the story. With that being said, this title only has 6 sentences in it (96 words). One of the sentences in the story goes on for 10 pages!! But, each page only has a few words.
3. The illustrations do give very good clues to the newly introduced text, as well as the repeated foods after the picnic is rained out.
4. Since there are so few words in the book, the font could have been a little larger and on only one page (pie) could the young reader skip over the words, since it is placed low on the page. I also noticed that the double-story a and g are used in this font.


message 4: by Jen (new)

Jen Ferry (librarygarden) | 17 comments 1. Page Turning Dynamic—plot engages reader to keep reading
2. Text—word repetition, new vocabulary added at an appropriate pace, sentence length, book length (24-96 pages)
3. Illustrations—give clues to the text, make sense with the text
4. Font—size, color, placement

The Thank You Book
By Mo Willems

1. Of course…who doesn’t want to read an Elephant and Piggie book?
2. Some words could be difficult for beginning readers (thankful, important, everybody) and there is not a way to support these words with illustrations. If readers are familiar with E & P books they should be familiar with not only the characters, but also some repeated vocabulary.
3. The illustrations help us know who is speaking and give us clues to which characters are being thanked on each page.
4. Speech bubble color, text size, and structure let us know not only who is talking but, how to emphasize words and emotions.


message 5: by Caren (new)

Caren (carenb) | 1 comments "Good Night Owl" by Greg Pizzoli is terrific.


message 6: by Jesse (new)

Jesse (girlnamedjesse) | 4 comments Full disclosure: I've only read What This Story Needs is a Crunch and a Munch of this month's books.

1. I feel like this book (and the series) is a wonderful easy reader because it utilizes rhyme and similar sounds to move the story along.

2. I'm reading to a baby rather than an actual emerging reader, so I prefer shorter easy readers without a lot of text. This book fit the bill for me and I would hope for actual beginning readers. The sentences are spread across multiple pages with only a few words on each page. These bite sized pieces make tackling an entire book less intimidating.

3. The illustrations are funny! Who doesn't like seeing a pig in a wig? ;) They accurately represent the text while also offering hidden additional tidbits to the story.

4. With a narrator rather than characters speaking there isn't a need for speech bubbles, etc. By having only a few words on each page there is plenty of room for the illustrations to support what is happening in the story.


back to top