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Archives > 5. why does Tolstoy compare Vronsky to a murderer?

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message 1: by Kristel (new)

Kristel (kristelh) | 4207 comments Mod
When Anna and Vronsky have satisfied their desire for one another, why does Tolstoy compare Vronsky to a murderer?


message 2: by John (new)

John Seymour Vronsky destroys Anna's virtue and position in society, in a weird way because of her refusal to be a hypocrite. Her position in society is all Anna really seems to have.


message 3: by Kristel (new)

Kristel (kristelh) | 4207 comments Mod
Vronsky does not consider the consequences and has no desire for marriage or respect for rules of society, only the moment much like a murderer, he destroys.


message 4: by John (new)

John Seymour Also, there is the pivot point of the book, the horse race, which seems to me to be an allegory of the story, in his carelessness in riding his horse he causes her to "break" and to be destroyed. This is the way in which Tolstoy sees how his actions impact Anna. In light of the society in which they live and which neither of them is able to do without, his actions destroy her and, with the help of the opium, drive her mad, leading her to destroy herself. But Tolstoy wants it clear whose is the fault.


message 5: by Kristel (new)

Kristel (kristelh) | 4207 comments Mod
OH, yes, exactly. I remember thinking Vronsky killed his horse just like he was destroying Anna too.


message 6: by Patrick (new)

Patrick Robitaille | 975 comments I agree with John


message 7: by Becky Lynn (new)

Becky Lynn Very well said, John, and I couldn't agree more. I also never connected the morphine use to her going mad. I just thought it was the jealousy, but it totally makes sense now.


message 8: by Diane (new)

Diane  | 2051 comments John wrote: "Also, there is the pivot point of the book, the horse race, which seems to me to be an allegory of the story, in his carelessness in riding his horse he causes her to "break" and to be destroyed. T..."

I totally agree.


message 9: by Pip (new)

Pip | 1448 comments As I read the question I wondered where in the novel it was written and I was going to start with Vronsky's carelessness in the horse race. The analogy is excellent, John. I couldn't, however, place where in the book these words were written.


message 10: by Book (new)

Book Wormy | 2064 comments Mod
I also agree with John and I also held Vronsky more to blame than Anna as her pursued her and followed her.


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