Georgette Heyer Fans discussion

Powder and Patch
This topic is about Powder and Patch
43 views
Group Reads > Powder and Patch The Missing Final Chapter

Comments Showing 1-28 of 28 (28 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

Carol She's So Novel꧁꧂  | 4450 comments Mod
http://www.shelaghlewins.com/other_st...

and also some speculation about why GH & Heinemann decided to omit the final chapter - which changes the ending.

Open spoilers about Powder & Patch fine in this thread too!


Critterbee❇ (critterbee) | 2696 comments Mod
I enjoyed it, not one of my very favorites, but there were sparkling moments that I really enjoyed, especially love the scene towards the end of the book where Cleone has three proposals in one night.

Cleone was reminiscent of Fanny/Lavinia, and was a great character to read about, but not to be constantly in the company of in everyday life.

I also quite liked the parts in Paris.

GH definitely writes the time period effectively, without spillover from her regencies.


Carol She's So Novel꧁꧂  | 4450 comments Mod
& I found the original cover, which I think is absolutely lovely.

 photo 10fffd71-941a-4e27-95b6-452a6a2ec3fc.jpg


Louise Culmer it's a shame they left that chapter out, it's a good ending.


Susan in Perthshire (susanageofaquarius) | 1175 comments I didn't much like this chapter I'm afraid - as funny and well written as it is. The fact that the popinjay Phillippe has returned in an even more absurd incarnation; and that his ambitions now goes no higher than where to place a patch or which Jewel to accessorise goes right against the supposed lesson of the story - that substance is far more important than style. I think, as someone has already said - this totally reflects the difference between GH's situations in 1923 and 1930. Great to have the opportunity to read it though.


Susan in NC (susanncreader) | 3628 comments I agree with Susan - I'm glad to read the chapter and it's interesting, but honestly, Philip comes across as an empty-headed, shallow ninny - and treats Cleone like a dress-up doll, ick...


Carol She's So Novel꧁꧂  | 4450 comments Mod
Shelagh (the blogger) wrote she may not have it word perfect. The writing, especially at the start of the chapter, doesn't seem as polished as is usual for GH.

If Shelagh has copied accurately GH may have also thought the writing in this chapter wasn't up to scratch.

For such a young couple, I liked this ending. I would have liked to have seen an intention to go back to his estates though.

Also, until he told his father, there was no sign that Phillip wasn't at home in London.


message 8: by Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽ (last edited Jul 07, 2016 09:41AM) (new) - rated it 3 stars

Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽ | 361 comments I love that original cover, Carol, and thanks for finding this additional chapter! I enjoyed reading it, but it definitely isn't the way I envision Philip and Cleone's future. I can see them visiting Paris once in a while, but I think they settle down happily on Philip's country estate. I'm glad GH and her publisher pulled this chapter out of the revised version. It seems to indicate that they settle down in Paris long-term, and I just don't see that happening. Plus Philip spending 4 hours fixing Cleone up for the ball? Non, non, non! Lol. I like to think he's moved past that, as a lifestyle choice, unless it's just a one-off for their premier appearance in society.


Susan in NC (susanncreader) | 3628 comments Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽ wrote: "I love that original cover, Carol, and thanks for finding this additional chapter! I enjoyed reading it, but it definitely isn't the way I envision Philip and Cleone's future. I can see them visiti..."

Yes, I felt the takeaway was Sir Maurice and Cleone had learned the lesson Philip was trying to teach, to accept him as he was and prefer him for himself not as a "painted puppet"! It wasn't implicitly stated in either ending, but I thought that was the endgame to Philip's charade.


Susan in Perthshire (susanageofaquarius) | 1175 comments Susan in NC wrote: "Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽ wrote: "I love that original cover, Carol, and thanks for finding this additional chapter! I enjoyed reading it, but it definitely isn't the way I envision Philip and Cleone's f..."

Absolutely agree with you and Tadiana on this one.


Carol She's So Novel꧁꧂  | 4450 comments Mod
I think why I like the idea of Philip & Cleone going back to Paris is they are still so young. I like the idea of them having fun for a couple of seasons, then settling down.

A niece of my husband's was like the queen of the clubbing set in Auckland around 8 years ago. She now lives in Oz, but I imagine she would be bored out of her mind going back to that life now! & I see it as the modern equivalent to Philip & Cleone's life.


Louise Sparrow (louisex) | 459 comments Interesting... I get the impression that they are there for their honeymoon and so that he can introduce her to his friends. I think too that his dressing of her was more down to his intention to make an entrance than what he did every day.

I don't like the idea that she is now impressed with the new version of him though... I think we are supposed to get the idea that he's grown and can be both the sensible man and the man of fashion. It would help if I liked the man of fashion more I suppose.

I also have the vague notion that this entire scene was so that she could deliver the last line.


Carol She's So Novel꧁꧂  | 4450 comments Mod
Louise Sparrow wrote: "Interesting... I get the impression that they are there for their honeymoon and so that he can introduce her to his friends. I think too that his dressing of her was more down to his intention to m..."

Possible too! Cleone obviously loves Sir Maurice & now Philip is like a more fun version of his Dad!


message 14: by Elza (new) - rated it 4 stars

Elza (emr1) | 296 comments One of my very favorite romance tropes is the Nice Guy Hero, and Philip Jettan is definitely a Nice Guy. So I'm rooting for him from the beginning. But he is a bit full of himself -- he needs to learn that he has more to learn. I was pleasantly surprised -- as Sir Maurice was -- by his affinity for the French. And I have to say, they seemed to combine being real men with the whole fashion/poetry thing better than the English.

However, I really dislike the "misunderstanding that could have been resolved by one honest conversation" thing. I know, I know, this encompasses almost all romantic fiction, but it still annoys me. All the books would be shorter but the characters would be happy so much sooner! I do like stories where men and women actually tell each other the truth instead of "I love him/her! He/She must never know" --

I also dislike Philip's condescending attitude towards Cleone. "Dear, foolish, naughty Cleone" -- that's the way you talk to a pet, not your future wife! I know GH is reflecting the attitudes of the time in which the story is set, but I would bet that The Masqueraders' (view spoiler)

This was the first time I'd read, or even heard of, the missing final chapter. Have to say, hated it! Oh my goodness, Philip, stop being a girl already!

I would like to think that they go back home and have a long happy life in which Philip is a better-dressed, more cultured, version of himself. I love Cleone's relationship with Sir Maurice and that will go a long way towards everyone's happiness.

It is encouraging to see how GH moved towards stronger, more intelligent heroines -- women who could hold their own and hold out for what they wanted.


Susan in NC (susanncreader) | 3628 comments Elza wrote: "One of my very favorite romance tropes is the Nice Guy Hero, and Philip Jettan is definitely a Nice Guy. So I'm rooting for him from the beginning. But he is a bit full of himself -- he needs to le..."

Well said!


Susan in Perthshire (susanageofaquarius) | 1175 comments Elza wrote: "One of my very favorite romance tropes is the Nice Guy Hero, and Philip Jettan is definitely a Nice Guy. So I'm rooting for him from the beginning. But he is a bit full of himself -- he needs to le..."

Beautifully put:- and I am in total agreement!


message 17: by Fredrica (new)

Fredrica | 23 comments Well, this is very interesting. I had not read this extra chapter before or understood the difference between the books published under the different titles. I don't think the quality of the writing matches the rest of the book and I have to wonder whether GH's editor at Mills and Boon made her alter the ending against her will.


AlegnaB † (alegnab) I don't like the original ending, but thanks for posting it. I didn't much care for most of Powder and Patch, but I did enjoy the last fourth of the book, including the ending. I gave the book two stars and a 2.4 rating. I may have enjoyed it a little more if there weren't so much untranslated French.


Carol She's So Novel꧁꧂  | 4450 comments Mod
Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽ wrote: "Plus Philip spending 4 hours fixing Cleone up for the ball?

I think even in GH's youth they spent way longer dressing than we do - it's why 1920s fashions were so liberating. & many accounts have said that even though GH was born in 1902, at heart she was an Edwardian.

I've just started reading a blogger who is dressing & living like she is in Katherine Mansfield's time & it takes her 45 minutes to do her hair, let alone get dressed!


Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽ | 361 comments I do recall that when I was in college I took a solid 60-90 minutes to get ready for the day, depending on whether I was washing my hair that morning. Now I can do my hair and makeup in about 20 minutes, less if I'm in a rush. It's very liberating. :)


message 21: by Lori (new)

Lori Mulligan Davis | 196 comments Elza wrote: "One of my very favorite romance tropes is the Nice Guy Hero, and Philip Jettan is definitely a Nice Guy. So I'm rooting for him from the beginning. But he is a bit full of himself -- he needs to le..."

Thank you for this well-thought-out assessment.


Carol She's So Novel꧁꧂  | 4450 comments Mod
I've started rereading The Private World of Georgette Heyer by Jane Aiken Hodge in preparation for my trip & Hodge has the theory that GH used the Stella Martin nom de plume as an experiment - that after her early success with The Black Moth that she wanted more privacy & she discontinued the Martin name because she became Mrs Rougier.

The timing doesn't work - she wrote at least another three books before marriage.

& I don't know about now, but because of the amount of mocking they got, most Mills & Boon writers used an assumed name


Louise Sparrow (louisex) | 459 comments If I wrote for Mills and Boon, I would definitely use an assumed name ;)


Susan in Perthshire (susanageofaquarius) | 1175 comments Louise Sparrow wrote: "If I wrote for Mills and Boon, I would definitely use an assumed name ;)"

I know what you mean - but I had a friend and colleague who lectured at the same FE college as me years ago and she was a secret Mills and Boon author. We all teased her, when we first found out, but in actual fact, her stuff was well written (albeit to Mils and Boon guidelines) and was a nice little earner for her. As our Head of department said - 'if her books encourage someone to read who might not otherwise get started - then that has to be a good thing surely?'


Louise Sparrow (louisex) | 459 comments Oh certainly, they are widely enjoyed and I'm sure there are some very good ones out there, I have never actually read one through, only snippits, and they weren't good examples.

I do think though if you want to be taken seriously as an author later it might be a good idea to use a pen name.


Susan in Perthshire (susanageofaquarius) | 1175 comments Agreed! - I was interested to see that as well as our own GH, - Jack London, PG Wodehouse, Rosamunde Pilcher and Sally Beauman all started off writing for Mills and Boon under different names.


Carol She's So Novel꧁꧂  | 4450 comments Mod
Louise Sparrow wrote: "Oh certainly, they are widely enjoyed and I'm sure there are some very good ones out there, I have never actually read one through, only snippits, and they weren't good examples.

I do think though..."


Although NZ writer Daphne de Jong started off as Daphne Clair & would be better known under this name or as Laurey Bright. http://www.bookcouncil.org.nz/Writers...

As the above link says, her best work has a feminist slant. She was the first I heard say The Bone People has a basic Mills & Boon plotline!

& I went to a talk by Susan Napier who said she regretted not using her real name. She said she still got a lot of pleasure looking at her titles in a book shop, but not as much as if she used her own lname.


message 28: by Carol She's So Novel꧁꧂ , Madam Mod (last edited Jul 26, 2016 12:18PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Carol She's So Novel꧁꧂  | 4450 comments Mod
Susan in Perthshire wrote: "
I know what you mean - but I had a friend and colleague who lectured at the same FE college as me y..."


I would suspect that if there was a list showing top earning NZ writers, Nalini Singh & the M&B writers would be very high on it.

Edit: Susan Napier said she got a lot more respect when people realised how much she was likely to be earning!


back to top