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message 1: by C.A. (new) - added it

C.A. Bell | 3 comments Hi, I'm looking for people to review my debut novel, but I am struggling to get sign ups. Where can I post my sign up form? I've tried Fb and Twitter. Is there anywhere else?
Thanks


message 2: by Morris (new)

Morris Graham (morris_g) This is a forum for authors just like you. My best advice is to get your book available as print-on demand with Create Space. Then hold a giveaway on goodreads. This usually has a high percentage return for reviews.


message 3: by C.A. (new) - added it

C.A. Bell | 3 comments Morris wrote: "This is a forum for authors just like you. My best advice is to get your book available as print-on demand with Create Space. Then hold a giveaway on goodreads. This usually has a high percentage r..."

Thank you for the advice!


message 4: by Segilola (last edited Jun 20, 2016 09:51AM) (new)

Segilola Salami (segilolasalami) | 108 comments I am not sure hosting a giveaway has a high percentage of return review wise.

I have seen lots of comments by other authors who have had no reviews as a result of their giveaways. I didn't have a review for my previous giveaway.

The only reason I am doing a goodreads giveaway is to take advantage of people adding the book to their to be read shelf. This gives slightly more exposure too.

With my previous books, I never thought of giving ARCs except to my beta readers.

I am researching doing that now with my current WIP.

My research has highlighted netgalley as a good place to start. However, I feel it is too expensive and returns are not guaranteed

You can put a post on different goodreads groups asking for reviewers.

What I have found to work is approaching individuals who have posted that they are open to review requests. It is time consuming, but I have had great results with this approach.

Another place I am considering trying is LibraryThing


message 5: by Morris (new)

Morris Graham (morris_g) I had a 90% review return for the books I sent out. Mine were, however, autographed with a personal note to the reader. This may have made the difference.


message 6: by Segilola (new)

Segilola Salami (segilolasalami) | 108 comments ah ok good point . . . I don't think I did that with my first giveaway.

with my current one, not sure i can do that though as I opened it up to more countries outside of the UK with the hope to posting to winner directly from createspace. It would be too expensive for me to post internationally from the UK

out of interest, how many copies did you offer for your giveaway?


message 7: by A.M. (new)

A.M. Rycroft (amrycroft) | 10 comments The results of Goodreads giveaways can be mixed. On average, for every 10 given away, you may get anywhere from 1-3 reviews. That isn't a reason not to do them, however, because the benefit you will get 100% of the time is that each person who signs up for the giveaway item adds it to their GR shelf, which increases your exposure beyond just reviews.

NetGalley is expensive, but if you pay for the marketing package as well, you significantly increase your ROI. I highly recommend this method, as this was how I drummed up the initial reviews of my first book without much effort.

LibraryThing is another good source for getting the word out about your book.

I don't so much recommend signing the books you send for review (it devalues your signature after a certain point), however, including a personalized note increases your chance of getting a review out of the book. Just don't ask for a review in your note. It's bad form. A simple "thank you for your interest in my book, I sincerely hope you enjoy it" will suffice.


message 8: by Morris (last edited Jun 20, 2016 10:30AM) (new)

Morris Graham (morris_g) Right. Postage outside of the US is brutal, and delivery time is much, much longer. I did a giveaway of 10 books in the US, 2 to Canada. I got 9 US reviews, 2 Canadian. I bought the books at author's cost and shipped to me. It was the only way I could sign them. But because of this, I had to buy packaging and postage for each one. It would have been cost effective to buy each book at author's cost and have it shipped directly to the reader. But since I haven't done that yet, I have no idea if the reviews will be that high. Then again I think reviews of autographed books may get you a higher star review, too.


message 9: by Segilola (new)

Segilola Salami (segilolasalami) | 108 comments money is tight . . . gave away only 3 first round, giving away 2 this round


message 10: by C.A. (new) - added it

C.A. Bell | 3 comments How about review groups? Have any of you submitted to them for review?
I have had ten people sign up to my ARC form so far, so I'm pleased. Was just hoping for more since it is my debut novel :)


message 11: by A.M. (new)

A.M. Rycroft (amrycroft) | 10 comments Morris wrote: "Right. Postage outside of the US is brutal, and delivery time is much, much longer. I did a giveaway of 10 books in the US, 2 to Canada. I got 9 US reviews, 2 Canadian. I bought the books at author..."

One tip I read about is if you're an Amazon Prime member, you can "gift" your book to your international winners by purchasing your book, including a personal note, and sending it via free 2-day. This doesn't allow you to sign each copy, of course, but it will save on shipping costs.


message 12: by Virginia (new)

Virginia | 142 comments NetGalley doesn't have to be expensive, if you join a coop renting monthly slots. There's a great one at broaduniverse.com that's only $45 a month, and many more besides. Great exposure for a much more reasonable price. I highly recommend it. Also, there are a few smaller galley review sites like StoryCartel that are also cheap and have a pretty good return on reviews.

Those would be my top two recommendations for anyone looking for ARC exposure.

In addition, consider organizing a blog tour either by contacting book bloggers for your genre yourself (only with the utmost deference and respect and after thoroughly researching their review requirements--no one likes to get unsolicited emails for reviews that don't meet their criteria) or through a marketing/promotions person who organizes blog tours for your genre.


message 13: by A.M. (new)

A.M. Rycroft (amrycroft) | 10 comments C.A. wrote: "How about review groups? Have any of you submitted to them for review?
I have had ten people sign up to my ARC form so far, so I'm pleased. Was just hoping for more since it is my debut novel :)"


I'll be honest, it is going to be hard for any debut author to generate a lot of ARC requests (you just don't have the social capital yet). So, 10 to start is a good number.

In regards to the review groups, the ones I have submitted my book to have long waiting lists, but I think it's worth it to submit to them anyhow. Just be aware you may have to wait a year before your book comes up.

And, only submit your book to a book exchange review group (you sign up to review other authors' work in exchange for a review of your work) if you have time to read and review someone else's novel. These types of groups often have strict policies about participants needing to finish the work their assigned in order to get a review of their own work.


message 14: by Morris (last edited Jun 20, 2016 10:48AM) (new)

Morris Graham (morris_g) One other method is going to where the reviewers are--Amazon. Find your genre and check out the reviewers that are reviewing books like yours. Get a Word doc and keep track, because this method takes time. Find reviewers that review books and are generally in the four and five-star range for the book that you are looking at. Click on the reviewer, and it pulls up their Amazon profile. Some of them say that they are open to being approached for a review, what kind of books they like, and what format they prefer. If they leave a website addy or email addy, check them out.

RULES:
1) Be polite
2) Ask them to review something in a genre that they like.
3) Offer them a free book in the format they prefer. (Don't bait-and-switch)
4) Make sure you tell them that this is just for an honest review of your book, no pressure for anything else.
6) Do not email back and harass someone when they haven't posted a review. Just move along.
5) Finally, be polite.


I think it is okay after they agree to review it, if they haven't responded back saying that they got it, to email them and asked them if they received it. Just once. Keep track on a spreadsheet of everyone you've solicited so you don't hit them up a second time. Most reviewers that don't have time just delete your email; they don't answer back.


message 15: by A.M. (new)

A.M. Rycroft (amrycroft) | 10 comments Morris wrote: "One other method is going to where the reviewers are--Amazon. Find your genre and check out the reviewers that are reviewing books like yours. Get a Word doc and keep track, because this method tak..."

Great tip! Thanks for sharing.


M. Ray Holloway Jr.   (mrayhollowayjr) | 180 comments One thing that I did when I started out was I began reviewing other new author's works. It takes time, because you have to read the book, of course, but you build up a great deal of good will with other people that often generates reviews for your work later.


message 17: by Grace (new)

Grace (themadmangoavenger) | 4 comments This is a little off from the beaten path, but recently I started serving authors and my audience more by doing reviews, interviews, and hosting book giveaways. Reason? I've noticed that nearly everyone in my company reads every chance they get. I thought it would be a great way to serve both.

You can see more about this as it developed in this Goodreads thread.

But, basically, we ask for a free copy of your book to read and review. They put the review on our site to start generating buzz as well as another review site of their choice (Goodreads, Amazon, Google, whatever they are a community of). Then, we do an interview with the author to keep generating some buzz. Finally, we host a book giveaway of your book -- generally the e-book so costs stay low, but if it's something we get a LOT of traffic on and resonates with our audience, we'll buy a signed physical copy and pay for shipping to put up there.

At each step we send traffic your way. They get points in the giveaway for going to your site, following you on social media, leaving a review to your book, whatever you need them to do.

Disclaimer: We are still in the beginning phases of setting this all up. We've done one giveaway so far with Ashley Capes, and it went decently well. He got a kick in sales and in traffic. That gave us the go-ahead to do it with more since our plan was working. We are currently reading and reviewing at a rate of 4/year, but as we perfect our system, we'll pick up speed in hopes to do 1/month.

If this seems like something you'd want to do, feel free to add your name and book to the Typeform survey.


message 18: by Segilola (new)

Segilola Salami (segilolasalami) | 108 comments Virginia wrote: "NetGalley doesn't have to be expensive, if you join a coop renting monthly slots. There's a great one at broaduniverse.com that's only $45 a month, and many more besides. Great exposure for a much ..."

Hiya,

Do you have any further info on StoryCartel? I find it a bit dubious that when I click on Author FAQ it blocks the page and asks for registration/sign up first. I would like to get some basic info on costs first before investing the time to sign up

When you last used them, how much did you pay and how many reviews did you get? What genre was your book? Did they truly give you the email addresses of the reviewers? Were the reviewers OK with you contacting them for a subsequent book (if you did contact them?

Thanks


message 19: by C.L. (new)

C.L. Lynch (cllynchauthor) | 316 comments I'm getting ready to launch my debut novel, too, so this is also important to me. Right now I have a pop up on my site offering people a free ebook copy of my book before the official publication date. This way I build an email list AND hopefully will get some reviews back. When I email it out I'll ask them to email me and let me know their thoughts.

I'm also going to try contacting some authors who have written books in my genre. They probably won't agree to read an ARC and supply me with a blurb, since I'm totally unknown, but it's worth asking, right?


message 20: by C.L. (new)

C.L. Lynch (cllynchauthor) | 316 comments Grace wrote: "This is a little off from the beaten path, but recently I started serving authors and my audience more by doing reviews, interviews, and hosting book giveaways. Reason? I've noticed that nearly eve..."
This is awesome! I have bookmarked it.


message 21: by Aislinn (new)

Aislinn | 150 comments Hi C.,

I just wanted to say that I wouldn't recommend you contacting authors for a quote. I just saw the other day a few authors complaining about people doing this and how they immediately deleted it. It causes them a lot of potential legal issues if they read it, apparently. They were frustrated and upset that people were doing it.

So, uh, just a warning?


message 22: by Grace (new)

Grace Crandall | 79 comments Something I'm doing is following a bunch of book review blogs. (there are a TON of them!) when I find a blog with interesting reviews that I don't actually mind taking the time to read once or twice a week, chances are I've found a blogger who, likewise, could be interested in my genre. I also think it's a good idea to do some promotion for their blog, even beyond following and commenting--they're trying to gain exposure too. so I started a Pinterest board of book reviews (another plus of this, I can pin reviews for my books to that board!) And I'm wondering about sharing some of the more interesting ones on my other platforms.
And when I finally do have printed ARCs, there will be a whole troupe of possible reviewers to contact about it.
That's all prep, but I think as long as you follow their review policy and are very polite, approaching book bloggers out of the blue is usually okay as well :)


message 23: by C.L. (new)

C.L. Lynch (cllynchauthor) | 316 comments Aislinn wrote: "Hi C.,

I just wanted to say that I wouldn't recommend you contacting authors for a quote. I just saw the other day a few authors complaining about people doing this and how they immediately delete..."


Oh, that's good to know. I had read it as a suggestion on some indie publishing site somewhere...


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