Aussie Readers discussion

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message 1: by T.J. (new)

T.J. (teejayslee) | 42 comments Second novel 'CLOISTER' got a nice review from KIRKUS

https://www.kirkusreviews.com/book-re...

(which is a relief because they can be brutal sometimes) but this is the third time now I have seen a comment about the 'Australianism/Australian patois'.

I have toned down the lingo (sorry, slang) to avoid alienating foreign readers but how far should you go? I'm aiming for somewhere between Shane Maloney (very Aussie) and Tim Winton (very accessible) without going as far as Peter Carey (British English). I like writing in Australian!

But I draw the line at changing 'ute' to 'pickup truck' so should I include an 'Australian patois' guide at the end of every novel? Just an idea.

TJ


message 2: by Ryan (new)

Ryan Just don't call prawns shrimps.


message 3: by T.J. (new)

T.J. (teejayslee) | 42 comments I also refuse to call a nong a fool.


message 4: by Linda (new)

Linda An American checking in - some of the Aussie authors I've read have a short "dictionary" of the most "obscure" Aussie-isms at the back of the book. Most of us would pickup ute after a bit, but we would have a lot of trouble with nong. Prawns we understand also. So don't tone it down (I LOVE learning the intricacies of a "foreign" language!) Just maybe help us out.


message 5: by T.J. (new)

T.J. (teejayslee) | 42 comments @Linda. Good advice mate!


message 6: by Linda (new)

Linda And keep your Aussie cheekiness. If I'm translating properly I'm guessing a nong is "someone only a mother could love."


message 7: by T.J. (new)

T.J. (teejayslee) | 42 comments @Linda yep and that makes me a nong.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yDb_W...


message 8: by Jülie ☼♄  (last edited Jun 17, 2016 05:27PM) (new)

Jülie ☼♄  | 6262 comments I think the great thing about Aussie slang/patois is that it is so versatile, and can be used to great effect in almost any situation. For example it can be grave, insulting, sensitive, or even lol funny depending on the circumstances and delivery...it's all about "nuance"! Who'da thunk it eh? ;D


message 9: by Brenda, Aussie Authors Queen (new)

Brenda | 68712 comments Mod
I have noticed a number of Aussie writers use "Americanisms" and their spelling and it annoys me. When I see "favorite" and "tire" (for tyre) and various others... I have asked a couple of authors I know why they do it, and it's so they can "reach the wider US audience".

But the way I look at it - our American friends don't write to suit the Aussie readers, so why should we write to suit them?!

Everyone is different and every language has its little nuances - leave it be and love our language and ways. They'll figure it out (and I agree with Linda - if you want to put meanings in a book, that works!)


message 10: by Dale (new)

Dale Harcombe | 5779 comments Brenda wrote: "I have noticed a number of Aussie writers use "Americanisms" and their spelling and it annoys me. When I see "favorite" and "tire" (for tyre) and various others... I have asked a couple of authors ..."

I'm with you Brenda. Us Aussies manage to deal with American spellings and not be put off by them. Anything I write will have Australian spelling.


message 11: by Linda (new)

Linda Brenda wrote: "I have noticed a number of Aussie writers use "Americanisms" and their spelling and it annoys me. When I see "favorite" and "tire" (for tyre) and various others... I have asked a couple of authors ..."

I think many of us Americans actually LIKE having the words spelled "naturally." It gives us a chance to think that we are sophisticates, since we read "foreign" languages.


message 12: by Dale (new)

Dale Harcombe | 5779 comments Linda wrote: "Brenda wrote: "I have noticed a number of Aussie writers use "Americanisms" and their spelling and it annoys me. When I see "favorite" and "tire" (for tyre) and various others... I have asked a cou..."
I like that response Linda.


message 13: by Brenda, Aussie Authors Queen (last edited Jun 17, 2016 06:11PM) (new)

Brenda | 68712 comments Mod
Linda wrote: "Brenda wrote: "I have noticed a number of Aussie writers use "Americanisms" and their spelling and it annoys me. When I see "favorite" and "tire" (for tyre) and various others... I have asked a cou..."

Haha! Don't know if you'd class Aussie as "foreign" Linda but maybe to some it is ;)


message 14: by Brenda, Aussie Authors Queen (new)

Brenda | 68712 comments Mod
Dale wrote: "Brenda wrote: "I have noticed a number of Aussie writers use "Americanisms" and their spelling and it annoys me. When I see "favorite" and "tire" (for tyre) and various others... I have asked a cou..."

It's not all Aussie writers Dale, (though of course I haven't read EVERY Aussie author) but still, I'd prefer it to be "ours"..


Jülie ☼♄  | 6262 comments It's what makes us unique...

We are unique...just like everyone else! ;))


message 16: by Elias (last edited Jun 17, 2016 06:17PM) (new)

Elias Zanbaka | 862 comments I have to admit, it is kind of refreshing when I read a lot of "Aussie-isms" in books. It automatically puts you there in the story because of the instant familiarity whereas much of the American language I've heard has been mostly picked up from films, TV shows, interviews etc.


message 17: by Andrea (new)

Andrea | 1583 comments Linda wrote: "It gives us a chance to think that we are sophisticates, since we read "foreign" languages. ..."

Love it!


message 18: by Marianne (new)

Marianne (cloggiedownunder) | 8056 comments I agree with keeping Aussieisms in, but providing a glossary. That way the reading experience can be a pleasure and an education.

I do find it annoying when I have to go to the computer to look lots of things up.

And I wholly agree about American spelling and usage in books set in Australia. That's what annoyed me so much about Private Down Under: we definitely don't use tire or cell phone or sidewalk or mom.


message 19: by Laura (new)

Laura | 4298 comments There is nothing like being exposed to different ways of writing and that includes slang. I bet even some Aussies might not know all the slang due to where they live.

But yes like others have mentioned a glossary would help out..And there are people out there who like to learn slang from different countries (my friend and I did this once..haha).


message 20: by Linda (new)

Linda Laura wrote: "There is nothing like being exposed to different ways of writing and that includes slang. I bet even some Aussies might not know all the slang due to where they live.

But yes like others have ment..."


And if you were anything like me, the stuff you learned was all the dirty stuff. It was fun learning to say profanity in foreign languages. You could insult your enemies without them knowing it!


message 21: by Leonie (new)

Leonie (leonierogers) | 3116 comments Brenda wrote: "I have noticed a number of Aussie writers use "Americanisms" and their spelling and it annoys me. When I see "favorite" and "tire" (for tyre) and various others... I have asked a couple of authors ..."

I just love this comment, Brenda! It's so encouraging, because every now and then, we Australian authors receive comments about our spelling - when we've written using the Australian spelling. It's so frustrating, when we have to read books, which to us, are full of missing Us and too many Zs.


message 22: by Brenda, Aussie Authors Queen (new)

Brenda | 68712 comments Mod
That's good Leonie :) You stick to Aussie - it's your country after all :)


message 23: by T.J. (new)

T.J. (teejayslee) | 42 comments I can certainly build a lexicon into the back of my books, I think that is an easy thing to do and a good compromise.

TJ


message 24: by PattyMacDotComma (new)

PattyMacDotComma | 1654 comments T.J. wrote: "I can certainly build a lexicon into the back of my books, I think that is an easy thing to do and a good compromise.

TJ"


That's the best idea T.J. If someone's a bloody galah, say so! And explain later.

I'm a transplanted American and I grew up with American literature and now love Australian literature. There is nothing so false as an Aussie story that doesn't use Aussie language when it's called for.

It shouldn't be all cobbers and rhyming slang unless it's dialogue between older blokes, or at least old-fashioned ones, but tyre and mum and Macka's and bickies and arvo are perfectly good words and ought to be preserved!

And don't get me started on the fact that a pickup and a ute are NOT the same thing. Our 'real' utes equate only to the old El Caminos, as far as I know.


message 25: by Linda (new)

Linda Hear hear, ex-pat! This same thing applies to the modern Indian lit I read. Must be something about the British ex-colonies. If it doesn't sound like the country, it ain't good lit!


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