Catching up on Classics (and lots more!) discussion

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30-Day Challenge! > 30-day Challenge! - Day 19: Ebook or Treebook, what's your preference?

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message 1: by MK (last edited May 05, 2014 03:39PM) (new)

MK (wisny) | 2993 comments Day 19: Ebook or Treebook, what's your preference?

-Ebook! I've become a big fan of my kindle books. Not to disparage treebooks, but I really like the easy portability, quick word look up, and search within text, not to mention instant access to huge, massive libraries, which are often very inexpensive or even free to acquire, which ebooks are able to provide.


Who wants to play!


message 2: by Kim (new)

Kim (whatkimreads) Both.. I don't want to imagine a world without real books. But at the same time I wouldn't want to wish my eReader away either! I just need them both, okay, I have a lot of needs! :D

But if I had to choose I would consider my status as a (poor) student right now and choose eBooks. WAY more possibilities for us and it is very overwhelming sometimes what we have to read (especially my faculty, linguistics and literature, and the history people), so if you have to buy all these fysical books (which are NOT of your own choice and you will probably only read once in your life) and carry them around with you because you are reading on a deadline and afterwards store them somewhere in your way-too-small student room in between course notes of 1000 pages... I can go on for hours on this subject, I'll just stop here. :D

But, I am very certain that once I have my own place and I am a more mature reader I want to invest in a huuuuuuuuuuge, very old fashioned bookcase and fill it with actual books that I have read and loved and I would want to stare at for days. I strongly believe that the books you read tell a lot about the person you are, so I want people to look at my massive bookcase and see that there is a lot more substance to me as a person than just me. Also because I am a very tiny person, I sort of want to show that I do not think as a tiny person. (This is a weird philosophy, but it's true lol... I want that bookcase!)


message 3: by Kirsten (new)

Kirsten  (kmcripn) I'm half and half, I think. I love the feel of a "tree" book. It's easier to get comfy with a "tree" book. Also, sometime you have to have something to read when your kindle/e-book is charging!

As to e-books, they're great for reading in line at the pharmacy, in the waiting room, while on vacation, when you're reading something you don't want other people to know about. I agree about the word look up, you don't have to worry about losing your bookmark, you don't have to pack heavy books while on vacation...


message 4: by Kirsten (new)

Kirsten  (kmcripn) Kim reminds me of other reasons...

if a book is really large an e-book (or audiobook) is preferable.

if you want to read a book, but you don't necessarily want to KEEP that book, an e-book is preferable.


message 5: by MK (new)

MK (wisny) | 2993 comments Kim, I love your reasons!!!! No, you definitely do not think as a tiny person :))


message 6: by MK (new)

MK (wisny) | 2993 comments Kirsten --- more kindles is the solution to the charging problem ;-)


(lol!!!!!)


message 7: by Kirsten (new)

Kirsten  (kmcripn) LOL!!


message 8: by MK (new)

MK (wisny) | 2993 comments heh *sheepish chuckle*


message 9: by Melanti (new)

Melanti | 2386 comments I just either charge my Kindle at work or while I'm sleeping. But the e-ink Kindles last forever so there's no hurry. You've still got hours even after the low battery sign comes on.

My owned TBR is about half paper and half e-book, but I definitely read more e-books than paper books. They're just so much more convenient - especially for the big thick door stoppers. And the older classics are generally free.


message 10: by Kelly B (new)

Kelly B (kellybey) | 266 comments Treebooks for me:-). I like them for ease of flipping back in the book if I want to re-fresh my mind about something. I also love the feel and heft of real books. Plus, I don't have to worry about dropping a treebook and breaking it like I do my Nook;-).

I do have a Nook, and I read a book on it once a month or so. It is nice for easy access to many, many books!


message 11: by Bob, Short Story Classics (new)

Bob | 4853 comments Mod
I’m not such a prude that I don’t recognize the appeal of the eReader. I have two. I first started with a Nook and then was given a Kindle. Side note, I like the Kindle much better. I understand the convenience, ease of transport, and the privacy. As long as you have a charged battery you’re good to go. However, an eReader will never be able to stand upright on a bookshelf, side by side with other books, proudly displaying its title to all who pass by. When an eReader gets old enough it will simply quit, the screen goes blank and you are shopping for another one. A book doesn’t go blank you just keep turning pages. A book can even be a work of art with color and textured covers, an eReader will always be a thin rectangle box in your choice of black or white.

Aside from my liking of the look, feel, and sometimes smell of paper books. My biggest objection to ebooks is feeling of lost ownership. You have ownership with paper books. You can own the eReader, but you don’t own the ebook contained on the reader. At least in so far as what you can do with it. When I buy a paper book it’s mine do with as I want. When I finish reading a paper book I can loan it to a friend or several friends. I can sell it outright. I can trade it for another book, or I can donate it. As far as I know now this can’t be done with an ebook. I know that some ebooks can be loaned, but you can’t sell it, trade it, or give it away. Personally that galls me and its why I will never invest a lot money in an ebook library.

Another personal like of a paper book over and ebook is ease of going back and forth in a story. When reading a paper book, if I suddenly want to reread something from earlier read pages, I can hold my current place with a finger and quickly scan back pages looking for a particular wood or phrase. I have never been able to do this efficiently with an ebook, in fact most of the time I give up and do without the information.

Lastly if you ever find yourself on a desert island I hope you packed more than just an eReader. Imagine having your whole library and no power. I’ll shut up now.


message 12: by MK (new)

MK (wisny) | 2993 comments Never shut up :) (I enjoy your posts immensely)


message 13: by Maddie (new)

Maddie (shoegirl81) | 68 comments Treebook, definitely and especially paperback. I am one of those silly people who read in the bath. Could you imagine the consternation if I were to drop the e-book in a moment of clumsiness? It has only ever happened to me twice, but still. It would have been a much greater loss if it was a piece of semi-expensive equipment rather than a few hundred soggy pages!


message 14: by Melanti (new)

Melanti | 2386 comments Bob wrote: "Another personal like of a paper book over and ebook is ease of going back and forth in a story..."

This is definitely a benefit of paper! There IS a search function but that presumes you can remember the phrasing of the passage closely enough to be able to find it.

I've found myself highlighting and bookmarking more often to compensate, and that's something I never do in paper.

Bob wrote: "I know that some ebooks can be loaned, but you can’t sell it, trade it, or give it away. Personally that galls me and its why I will never invest a lot money in an ebook library."

I almost never pay full price for an ebook - I just shop the sales where I can get them for less than what it would cost me to get a paper copy. The rare exception is when I've been waiting eagerly for a book to come out and want to get started right away... I've been known to wake up at 2 or 3 AM the day a book is released just so I can get some quality reading time in before having to go to work.


message 15: by Melanti (new)

Melanti | 2386 comments Maggie wrote:"Could you imagine the consternation if I were to drop the e-book in a moment of clumsiness? It has only ever happened to me twice, but still. It would have been a much greater loss if it was a piece of semi-expensive equipment rather than a few hundred soggy pages!"

On the other hand, e-readers weather small does of water much better. I was at the park yesterday lounging under a tree and reading, and suddenly the sprinkler right next to me turned on. I was completely soaked in the half second it took to jump up, grab my stuff and flee.

A paper book would have been damaged if not ruined, but with the Kindle I was just able to dry it off and set the case in the sun for half an hour or so for it to dry.


message 16: by Annina (new)

Annina | 121 comments I like real books more. I have an ereader, but I don't use it too often. Maybe cause I haven't "learned" to read from it. And mainly all books that I can download in it, are in English, and I don't like to read in English.


message 17: by Julie (new)

Julie | 632 comments Well I don't even have an e-reader, I think I will have to borrow one from someone and see how I like it.

I think one of the benefits from an e-reader must be the weight - please correct me if I'm wrong, but I imagine it must be way lighter than some of the huge tomes I read at times ;-) and seeing as I have rheumatism in my hands and wrists I think this would be a benefit :-)

But yeah all the other perks of real books have kept me with them so far...


message 18: by Kelly B (new)

Kelly B (kellybey) | 266 comments Maggie wrote: "Treebook, definitely and especially paperback. I am one of those silly people who read in the bath. Could you imagine the consternation if I were to drop the e-book in a moment of clumsiness? It ha..."

I do this too:-). And, yes, I have dropped a few books in the water! Not only do I not read my Nook in the tub, I have learned not to read any library books in the bath, either. Only my own books.

I also read a lot when I take my kids to the swimming pool in the summer, and have learned not to bring my Nook there, too. My books (and me too) sometimes get dripped on or splashed while reading by the pool.


message 19: by Melanti (new)

Melanti | 2386 comments I have the Paperwhite which is under half a pound. The cover is about another half a pound, so the whole thing is just at a pound (a bit less than half a kilogram?).

So with a cover on it, it'll be heavier than most mass market paperbacks but lighter than your average hardback.

I think the Nook simple touches are about the same weight.

You can also opt for the slip-cases that you remove completely when reading to keep it at the half pound weight if you want to keep it as light as possible.


message 20: by Bob, Short Story Classics (last edited May 06, 2014 12:09PM) (new)

Bob | 4853 comments Mod
Julie wrote: "Well I don't even have an e-reader, I think I will have to borrow one from someone and see how I like it.

I think one of the benefits from an e-reader must be the weight - please correct me if I'..."


I have read Les Misérables - complete edition, Gone with the Wind, and The Stand all were paper books. I also read The Count of Monte Cristo on a Kindle. Big books on eReaders is much easier reading. I still want books like this in my real paper libaray.


message 21: by Pink (new)

Pink | 6556 comments Treebook always, but I do enjoy reading ebooks at bedtime as it's easier to see the words.


message 22: by [deleted user] (new)

Has to be treebook for me as I don't have a kindle or anything like that. Was told I could download a kindle app for my phone - had to laugh as my phone is practically medieval. It does calls and texts and that's it!
Is there any way of reading e-books on my laptop at all as I sometimes feel I'm missing out on certain books? (Please don't laugh - I'm "technologically challenged"!)


message 23: by Gavin (new)

Gavin (thewalkingdude) | 194 comments Physical books, all day everyday.


message 24: by MK (new)

MK (wisny) | 2993 comments Caroline wrote: "Has to be treebook for me as I don't have a kindle or anything like that. Was told I could download a kindle app for my phone - had to laugh as my phone is practically medieval. It does calls and t..."

Yes :), you can get a free kindle reading app for your laptop, or desktop too.

Go to this link, and download the one that will work on your device:
http://www.amazon.com/gp/feature.html...


You can shop LOTS of free books, once you have a free reading app. I recommend the Top 100 Free Bestseller Lists - you can browse the general one, or switch to your favorite genre:

http://www.amazon.com/Best-Sellers-Ki...


message 25: by [deleted user] (new)

MK wrote: "Caroline wrote: "Has to be treebook for me as I don't have a kindle or anything like that. Was told I could download a kindle app for my phone - had to laugh as my phone is practically medieval. It..."

Thank you so much, you are brilliant! :)


message 26: by MK (new)

MK (wisny) | 2993 comments You're welcome! :)


message 27: by [deleted user] (new)

MK wrote: "You're welcome! :)"

I did it! I can now read e-books. MK you are my hero! Lol :)


message 28: by MK (new)

MK (wisny) | 2993 comments So fun! :)

Happy kindling, Caroline! Glad to help


message 29: by Rachel (last edited May 21, 2014 06:38AM) (new)

Rachel May 19th - Day 19 Entry:

I am leaning more towards treebooks because something about the feel of the book does something to me. I guess joy. Also, I am very picky with books I buy for my nook because sometimes I feel if the story doesn't get me excited or is lacking that would be a waste of money. I do enjoy the free books, and am thrilled to find numerous classics in the free section in the nook store.

UPDATE!!! Just received my first ebook rental from the library and love it. It was very easy to download, and with my smart thinking I had my holds on the treebook and ebook, and when the ebook came first didn't need to wait anymore for the treebook.


message 30: by [deleted user] (last edited May 19, 2014 08:08AM) (new)

May 19:

A few years ago I would have answered treebook but since I purchased a Kindle for Christmas 2012, my preference has gravitated towards e-books. On occasion I still buy paperbacks, if I am going to pass them onto a friend. I enjoy the convenience of buying e-books (or borrowing through the county library system), the cost savings, the ability to listen to a book, and the fact I do not have to find a space on my overflowing bookshelves. Plus many of the Classics are free (depending on the translation) and the accompanying Audible version is often 99¢ or a reasonable price. ;-)

The downside: Daily Deals are dangerous and it makes it easier to buy a book on a whim. I am being far choosier about which e-books I buy now, even if they are under $2.


message 31: by MK (new)

MK (wisny) | 2993 comments haha so true, Lisa, on the KDDs :p


message 32: by Tytti (new)

Tytti | 1092 comments Treebooks for me because I don't own a reader. I did download that Kindle app and read one book with it but of course it's not really that convenient reading from a laptop.

I suppose I might get one one day but I am in no hurry. There are not that many classics I couldn't get from the library and I prefer them translated anyway. Also our university library system is quite good, so no need to buy lots of books. I like to see the books I own or have borrowed and I always check other people's bookcases. And I like the chance to borrow or give out my books. It's also easier also to see if I would like to read the book when I can skim through it.

I think the only reason I would actually need a e-reader, is that it would probably be easier to download interesting non-fiction books out of Amazon or something. Ordering them as real books might be too expensive and the libraries probably won't have them, either. Otherwise, I'll stick to treebooks.


message 33: by [deleted user] (new)

Treebook. There is just something about the smell of book pages, and holding a whole different world in your hands.


message 34: by Hilary (new)

Hilary (agapoyesoun) | 194 comments Treebook

I don't have a Kindle and am beginning to cave in to the idea of getting one. I have been endlessly ordering books for book clubs and the expense mounts up. They also take up a huge amount of space. Probably for those reasons an e-book makes sense.

I shall never abandon my treebooks though, as they become like friends. I doubt whether I could make such a connection with an e-book!


message 35: by Blueberry (new)

Blueberry (blueberry1) I want to say treebook but my ebook can be read at night with no lights on, is so lightweight, holds multiple books, ...(sigh).


message 36: by Joseph (new)

Joseph Fountain | 287 comments OK...now I've cheated on several others by giving more than one answer, but this time, I'm really not cheating. The answer is both. I read mostly on my eReader...but (for classics in particular), I still own the tree book (usually hardcover). They are trophies.


message 37: by siriusedward (new)

siriusedward (elenaraphael) | 2011 comments Both..
Treebook..for the pages, the smell.. the presence?
Ebook for convenience, portability, free books


message 38: by Jen (new)

Jen  (jennsps) | 107 comments Tree book is what I prefer, but ebook is how I usually read for the convenience of it.


message 39: by Loretta (new)

Loretta | 2668 comments Old school for me! Only tree books. I can't read on devices, it bothers my eyes.


message 40: by Terris (new)

Terris | 2390 comments siriusedward wrote: "Both..
Treebook..for the pages, the smell.. the presence?
Ebook for convenience, portability, free books"


I have to agree with you completely on this one. I love treebooks, but, wow, ebooks are always there! I find now with treebooks, ebooks, & audiobooks, my priority is -- any way I can get that book and get those words and that story into my brain -- doesn't really matter :)


message 41: by Hayley (new)

Hayley Shaver | 172 comments I love treebook, but if I can only get it on ebook or it's cheaper than a treebook, I'm there.


message 42: by Bat-Cat (new)

Bat-Cat | 1300 comments I love both and probably equally so it depends on the book (size, font size, etc.) whether I choose to read on my Kindle or in print form. ;-)


message 43: by Brina (new)

Brina Treebook. I still don't own a kindle or ereader.


message 44: by Rhedyn (new)

Rhedyn  (fernffoulkes) Definitely treebook.


message 45: by Renee (new)

Renee | 864 comments Treebooks are my preference, but I'm starting to read a little more ebooks now on my tablet with the Kindle app, and it's easy to check out a ebook from the library if they have it. After finding the Serial Reader app, I kind of like that one for books I want to read, but might not necessarily want to have a copy of on my bookshelf. I have limited space, so really try to only buy the ones I really want, and will re-read some time. Plus, call me weird, but I love the smell of a book, and just the feel of holding the book in my hands and turning the pages.


message 46: by Jehona (new)

Jehona | 182 comments I'll read e-books if I can get them for free, but I just don't feel like I own them if I buy them. Also, I get awful headaches from looking at a display, so treebook, preferably a paperback with very yellowish pages.


Maggie the Muskoka Library Mouse (mcurry1990) Physical books are my go-to, unless I am travelling for an extended period of time.


message 48: by Joseph (last edited Sep 25, 2021 12:08PM) (new)

Joseph Fountain | 287 comments mostly ebooks. Two reasons: reading mostly classics, they are often free, and I like the built in dictionary and word search.

However, for novels at least, I own a hardcover tree book for all I've read. My book case is my trophy case.


message 49: by Cynda (new)

Cynda | 2643 comments Tree book because the text doesn't blink, tire out my eyes and because my brain is still changing to read ebooks.

Ebooks because they sometimes have audio too which makes it so much easier to understand, processing the text through sight and sound, multi-sensory learning.


message 50: by Heather L (new)

Heather L  (wordtrix) | 239 comments I read both, but print books far outnumber ebooks by three to one. While I tend to prefer printed books, ebooks are convenient for free classics and portability where long/heavy books are concerned. The lighted screen is also convenient for reading on evening bus commutes. Print books are definitely more ideal for reading in the tub or poolside — better to risk a cheap paperback than an expensive electronic device.


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