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THE SECOND WORLD WAR > Q&A WITH THOMAS (SPOILER THREAD)

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message 1: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited May 04, 2014 07:45AM) (new)

Bentley | 44128 comments Mod
Simon and Schuster is providing us with a wonderful opportunity to chat with the author of the book Hanns and Rudolf which will be kicked off on May 12th.

The author Thomas Harding will be dropping in periodically to answer any and all of your questions regarding his book.

Please begin posting your questions for the author on this thread.

Thank you and I hope you will you enjoy this special author experience here at the History Book Club.

Those of you who have received free books in the offer should be posting the questions to the author that you might have about the book here. If you have a question for Thomas Harding - this is the thread.

Those of you who would also like to participate in the upcoming discussion can purchase a book from your local or online bookstore.

Regards,

Bentley

Hanns and Rudolf The True Story of the German Jew Who Tracked Down and Caught the Kommandant of Auschwitz by Thomas Harding by Thomas Harding Thomas Harding


message 2: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited May 04, 2014 07:48AM) (new)

Bentley | 44128 comments Mod
All, Thomas Harding will be joining us for this discussion so please in advance begin asking questions concerning the book Hanns and Rudolf here on this thread. Here is an example of the format: (you do not have to add the citation for this book because it is being discussed)

Hanns and Rudolf The True Story of the German Jew Who Tracked Down and Caught the Kommandant of Auschwitz by Thomas Harding by Thomas Harding Thomas Harding

Question: - Here is where you would type your question. Make sure that your question stands out in your post so it is easy for Thomas Harding to spot the question and answer quickly without wasting any time. We look forward to Thomas being with us and we want to make the experience enjoyable for him too. This is a wonderful opportunity and we want to thank our friends at Simon and Schuster for their generosity. Bold the word question followed by a colon and then type your question.


message 3: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited May 04, 2014 12:32PM) (new)

Bentley | 44128 comments Mod
You can start posting questions for Thomas following the prescribed format. Be advised that the discussion will not begin until May 12th.

==============================

Welcome Thomas Harding to the discussion and the Q&A thread - the discussion will not begin until May 12th but feel free to answer and respond to any questions that are posted in advance. We look forward to your interaction with the group.


message 4: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited May 04, 2014 12:29PM) (new)

Bentley | 44128 comments Mod
Question(s):

For many years, you and members of your family never realized the connection between your great uncle Hanns Alexander and Rudolf Hoss.

a) How has writing this book and doing the research that you did changed your perceptions of your great uncle?

b) Could you describe for us your personal experiences with your great uncle as a personality and family member before his death and how did you reconcile what you learned with that "personal connection" you had with him "as you knew him"?

c) Was it possible in retrospect to glimpse personal characteristics of your Uncle Hanns which you and your family overlooked prior to your research - which could explain how he did what he did?


message 5: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited May 04, 2014 12:33PM) (new)

Bentley | 44128 comments Mod
Question:

Were there any family members or even friends who were aware of your great uncle's history and story in detail or his connection to Rudolf Hoss? Why did you think he kept these things to himself?


message 6: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited May 04, 2014 05:27PM) (new)

Bentley | 44128 comments Mod
Question:

Whenever a writer discovers parallel life events of a close family member which have been hidden - it just seems that the discovery and the writing experience changes their life too? How has your life and your perspectives changed as a result of writing Hanns and Rudolf?


message 7: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44128 comments Mod
Question:

When I looked at the photo of the young Hanns soldier with his pipe in his mouth, I noticed the intensity of his eyes. I wondered how a man could keep those secrets for so many years. Was Hanns (your uncle) a deep intense sort of individual?


message 8: by Kristjan (new)

Kristjan | 45 comments Question:

Do you feel some regret that you had no knowledge of these events until after your great-uncle's death? Even though he may not have wished to do so, it seems a waste that he never got to tell his story directly.


message 9: by Thomas (new)

Thomas Harding (thomasharding) | 45 comments Bentley wrote: "Question(s):

For many years, you and members of your family never realized the connection between your great uncle Hanns Alexander and Rudolf Hoss.

a) How has writing this book and doing the r..."


Hello all, it is a real pleasure to join you in this Q&A on Hanns and Rudolf. I have never done this before so please let me know if I am doing it right, and feel free to make suggestions on how I can improve the experience for you.

So how has the writing of this book impact my impression of my uncle? Before I heard my great-uncle's eulogy my sense of Hanns was of a prankster, a larger-than-life character, someone who told us kids dirty jokes, who stayed late at the synagogue and cleared up the furniture. He was the man who made the toasts at family events, he liked to read the poem "If" by Rudyard Kipling at special occasions.

Now, having spent seven years on the book and having spent so much time with him as a research subject, I have come to see a more complex character. He was a man filled with great anger and disappointment, he refused to return to Germany and didn't want to talk about his wartime experiences. And yet I am filled with admiration at some of the choices that he made (I won't spoil the ending for those who have not got that far!).


message 10: by Thomas (new)

Thomas Harding (thomasharding) | 45 comments Bentley wrote: "Question:

Were there any family members or even friends who were aware of your great uncle's history and story in detail or his connection to Rudolf Hoss? Why did you think he kept these things t..."


There were rumours inside the family about my great-uncle's wartime exploits. But those who had heard 'something' did not believe what they heard. For the rest of us, including Hanns' two daughters, we had no idea that he had been a war crimes investigator let alone tracked down and arrested the Kommandant of Auschwitz.

As to why he kept this secret, this is one of the questions I would most like to ask him. Perhaps it was because he didn't want to relive those dark days, or perhaps he didn't want to burden us, the next generation. Or maybe he didn't want to stir up the old hatred. Most likely it was a combination of all of these reasons.


message 11: by Thomas (new)

Thomas Harding (thomasharding) | 45 comments Bentley wrote: "Question:

Whenever a writer discovers parallel life events of a close family member which have been hidden - it just seems that the discovery and the writing experience changes their life too? How has your life and your perspectives changed as a result of writing Hanns and Rudolf?"


You are correct, my perspective has adjusted.

I was amazed that a man could be both loved by his family and yet oversee one of the greatest mass murders in history.

I was stunned by the arc of my great-uncle's story: from happy-go-lucky kid to cold-blooded Nazi hunter.

I was surprised that I knew this story so well and yet didn't know it at all.

Most of all, I was overwhelmed by the sense that humans are complex, defying easy explanations, and that Hanns and Rudolf should not be seen as cardboard cut-outs or two-dimensional characters.


message 12: by Katy (new)

Katy (kathy_h) Thomas, thank you for joining us. I appreciate your added insight.


message 13: by Thomas (new)

Thomas Harding (thomasharding) | 45 comments Kristjan wrote: "Question:

Do you feel some regret that you had no knowledge of these events until after your great-uncle's death? Even though he may not have wished to do so, it seems a waste that he never got to tell his story directly.
."


Hi Kristjan. I do wish I had known about my great-uncle's story before he died so that I could ask him some questions that remain unanswered: Why didn't he remain a nazi hunter after the war? Did he kill the Gauleiter? Why didn't he talk about this story? Most of all I would like to have congratulated him and then tell him how proud I was of his actions


message 14: by Thomas (new)

Thomas Harding (thomasharding) | 45 comments Bentley wrote: "Question:

When I looked at the photo of the young Hanns soldier with his pipe in his mouth, I noticed the intensity of his eyes. I wondered how a man could keep those secrets for so many years. Was Hanns (your uncle) a deep intense sort of individual? ."


Hi Bentley. He was a larger-than-life character, big personality, very handsome (and I mean VERY handsome). He had a great sense of humour and was quick to laugh, and cry. Like many in the family when he cried his lower lip trembled. But he was not 'intense', he was easy-going. That doesn't mean that he didn't feel intense feelings, such as anger, excitement, joy and hatred.


message 15: by Bryan (new)

Bryan Craig Welcome Thomas and thanks for joining us.

Question: I read that Rudolf was taken by Gypsies back in his home-town. Was that a fairly common practice?


message 16: by Thomas (new)

Thomas Harding (thomasharding) | 45 comments Hi Bryan. I doubt it very much. Rudolf expresses shock that he was kidnapped.


message 17: by Sherry (new)

Sherry (directorsherry) | 129 comments I was immediately into your book. I look forward to the read. Bentley asked every question I was going to ask you today. I will certainly ask more as I read. It's already a wonderful story. I thought that it's interesting irony that Rudolf's only friend as a child was his horse, Hans.


message 18: by Katy (new)

Katy (kathy_h) Question

How long had you been working as a journalist when Hanns Alexander passed away? Or were you working at a different job at the time?


message 19: by Jill (last edited May 10, 2014 03:36AM) (new)

Jill Hutchinson (bucs1960) I just got the book in the mail today, so I will have some questions in the next few days.
Thanks you so much for taking time to join us. It is greatly appreciated.


message 20: by Thomas (new)

Thomas Harding (thomasharding) | 45 comments Kathy wrote: "Question

How long had you been working as a journalist when Hanns Alexander passed away? Or were you working at a different job at the time?"


Hi Kathy. I have been working as a journalist and/ or in the media since I left college. At the time of Hanns' death I wrote for a newspaper in West Virginia.


message 21: by Jill (new)

Jill Hutchinson (bucs1960) It's a small world....I am from WV. What was the newspaper where you worked?


message 22: by Thomas (new)

Thomas Harding (thomasharding) | 45 comments The Shepherdstown Observer


message 23: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited May 10, 2014 04:33PM) (new)

Bentley | 44128 comments Mod
Thanks Thomas - welcome - we will be opening up the discussion on Monday - feel free to join the discussion on any of the threads including this one. We are delighted to have you and thank you for the responses so far. They are enlightening.

Folks are still receiving the books as we speak. There was a delay in getting these out so the timing is tight but we will begin on Monday in spite of this and folks can catch up as they get their books. I purposely kept week's one reading assignment light.


message 24: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44128 comments Mod
All, please post all of your questions for Thomas here on this thread.


message 25: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44128 comments Mod
Liza - really excellent questions in the last paragraph - make sure to follow format outlined in message 2 - this will make it easier for Thomas.


message 26: by Liza (last edited May 11, 2014 09:02PM) (new)

Liza Lugo Sorry, Bentley. I missed that. I'll re-do it :) Trying to figure out how to bold type...grrr :) Oh...never mind,I figured it out. Thanks!


message 27: by Liza (new)

Liza Lugo Question: Thomas, in researching Rudolf's childhood, did you feel that you could see "the writing on the wall?" This is not to say that it is an excuse for his horrific actions. Do you believe Rudolf's history provides insight as to the risks associated to terrorizing society when violence and detachment becomes the "norm" particularly in young people?

For me, the first chapter is compelling. Particularly since the world has struggled with understanding the extent of the dehumanization of the two world wars and how to prevent reoccurrence. The World Health Organization supports the finding that prior victimization is the strongest predictor of perpetration of abuse. I believe that understanding the micro-levels (neglect or child and domestic abuse) is critical in understanding the macro-levels associated with genocide and other atrocities. Rudolf was subjected to: kidnapping, severe punishment, a bigoted father who he feared & despised, a distant mother, and the experience of being a child soldier.


message 28: by Thomas (new)

Thomas Harding (thomasharding) | 45 comments Question: Thomas, in researching Rudolf's childhood, did you feel that you could see "the writing on the wall?" This is not to say that it is an excuse for his horrific actions. Do you believe Rudolf's history provides insight as to the risks associated to terrorizing society when violence and detachment becomes the "norm" particularly in young people?


Hi Liza.

I am not a psychologist or psychiatrist, but I have thought about this a great deal.

The truth is that Rudolf Höss did not murder over a million people because of a bad childhood. First, his childhood was not that bad. And second, plenty of people had/ have far worst childhoods and did not/ do not turn out to be mass murderers.

Instead, and for me this is fascinating, it is possible to trace Rudolf Höss as he made a series off decisions during his life - starting with running away to war at 14 years old, signing on with the Freikorps joining the Nazi party, moving to Dachau, and so on - which led him to becoming the Kommandant of Auschwitz. It is key to realise that he was fully aware of what he was doing along the way.

To argue that he was a product of his circumstances let's him off the hook and makes excuses for his atrocities.

On the other hand, I would equally argue that he was not a psychopath (though his actions almost by definition make him so). A panel of psychologists evaluated him later in life and found him to be above average intelligence and lacking in empathy. However, he was well-loved by his family and many of those who met him described him as an 'normal' man.

Instead, what we have is a relatively intelligent and sane man, unburdened by a pre-determined psychological fate, who chooses to construct and manage the machinery that murders over a million women, men and children.

Why does he want this? Some or all of the following is probably the answer: because he believes in the National Socialist ideology, because he wants to please his bosses, because he gains satisfaction from a 'job well done', because he and his family benefits materially from the endeavour, because he enjoys the power over other people, because he regards the subjects of his terror, particularly the Jews, as sub-human.

To me this is far more frightening, and reveals something appalling about the human condition: anyone can become a mass murderer, it is a choice. One of the reasons I wrote the book as a dual biography was to allow the reader to compare the decisions and choices made by the two men, throwing into relief the power that each of them, each of us, has over our lives.

In this way, Rudolf Höss serves as a warning: that such deeds can happen again, and that we must be vigilant to avoid future tragedies.


For more on this subject read an article I wrote for the Daily Beast: http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles...


message 29: by Ctgt (new)

Ctgt | 13 comments Hi Thomas. Thanks for joining the discussion.

Question: I liked the journey the Alexander Torah took throughout the story. Did your great-uncle ever talk about his faith in relation to what happened to him and the Jews as a group?


message 30: by Thomas (new)

Thomas Harding (thomasharding) | 45 comments Hi Ctgt (is that your name? Does it stand for something?)

My great-uncle and his family were not observant Jews in Berlin. After the end of the war, and all their experiences before and during, they became much more active in the local Jewish community in London (made up mostly from refugees from Nazi Germany and Austria). I am not sure it was a question of 'faith', but more a question of belonging, tradition and service to those around. Perhaps most all, it was about celebrating the freedom that they now had in England to celebrate their religion and culture.

For many years Hanns was the unofficial caretaker of the synagogue, along with his brother Paul, stacking chairs, clearing up after the service, taking care of the Alexander Torah.


message 31: by Ctgt (new)

Ctgt | 13 comments Thomas wrote: "Hi Ctgt (is that your name? Does it stand for something?)"

Trying to stay as low on the internet radar as possible.

Thanks for the response.


message 32: by Sherry (last edited May 12, 2014 02:21PM) (new)

Sherry (directorsherry) | 129 comments QUESTION. The family seemed so strongly German before the rise of Hitler. Was the extent of the anti-Semitism a complete surprise to them?


message 33: by Thomas (new)

Thomas Harding (thomasharding) | 45 comments Hi Sherry.

No and Yes and no.

Anti-semitism was prevalent in Germany, as it was in the UK, France, Poland, USA and Russia. For example, Alfred's wife Henny's family were from Frankfurt. A few decades earlier they had lived on 'Jew Street', along with other wealthy (like the Rothschilds) and not so wealthy Jews. A few decades before that they had been severely restricted in their work, faith and social activities because of their religion.

However, Alfred Alexander considered himself German. He fought in WW1 and won a medal. He lived in Berlin, the centre of the world's culture, he was friends with the great and the good, some of them at the top of their professions, worldwide. When they took power, he thought that Hitler and his thugs would fade away after the general population saw sense... until they didn't.

This despite having experienced personal anti-semitism. For example, when he graduated from medical school in Munich he was offered a job (I think it was Frankfurt) on the condition that he convert to Christianity. This was in the first decade of twentieth century.


message 34: by Sherry (new)

Sherry (directorsherry) | 129 comments Thomas wrote: "Hi Sherry.

No and Yes and no.

Anti-semitism was prevalent in Germany, as it was in the UK, France, Poland, USA and Russia. For example, Alfred's wife Henny's family were from Frankfurt. A few d..."


QUESTION It is hard to fathom how an entire society buys into something so irrational. I have studied this issue in so many classrooms. Do you have any new insights into how this happened?


message 35: by Bryan (new)

Bryan Craig Awesome job on the questions, Sherry. Don't forget to bold the word question, so it is easier to read, like thus:

Question: type question here


message 36: by Thomas (new)

Thomas Harding (thomasharding) | 45 comments Hi Sherry.

I am not sure I have any new insight on this subject which has been studied and studied and studied.

Here is one thing I can say, Rudolf believed anti-semitism was quite the opposite of anything 'irrational'. Instead he view anti-semitism as 'scientific', in contract to what he saw as the more populist anti-semitism of the Jew with the hook nose and the bags of money.

But is it really so hard to imagine a large group of people mobilised towards violent hatred when you remember what happened in Rwanda between the Tutsis and the Hutus? They killed perhaps as many as 1 million people in a hundred day period with just machetes.

The 'whole society' did not buy into it, however, there were those who left the country, such as half the Jewish population, thousands of communists and other dissidents. In addition, there were a few who remained who helped the victims.

However, your general point is correct, this was a society-wide genocide, not restricted to just a few psychopaths who worked for the SS. After all, it took tens of thousands of people to round up the Jews, transport them to the camps, run the camps, manage the machinery of murder. Only a tiny of fraction of these ever faced justice. It took many hundreds of thousands to at the very least turn a blind eye to what was going on, and of course millions voted the Nazis into power and at one point there were over 8 million members of the Nazi party.

Some of this was down to ideology, some it was down to propaganda, but a great deal out of it was down to a mixture of hatred, selfishness and a lack of moral fortitude. The last is proven by those sadly few examples of Germans who worked to save the victims, either by hiding them or helping them escape. Some of these have been acknowledged by Yad Vashem as Righteous Amongst Nations. See here for a list: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_...


message 37: by Dave (new)

Dave | 513 comments Sherry wrote: "QUESTION. The family seemed so strongly German before the rise of Hitler. Was the extent of the anti-Semitism a complete surprise to them?"

Hi Sherry. Just a quick note regarding the basis for anti-semitism that may be of interest to you based on your question. I just finished a fascinating and frightening book on the topic that gives some background back to the early days of Christianity, as well as an update on the state of anti-semitism today. I think you'll be surprised at the global prevalence of anti-semitism - not just in the Middle East, but throughout Europe, Asia and South America. We don't see it as much in the U.S., so I was quite surprised.

The text is sometimes a bit dry and scholarly, but worth reading.

The Devil That Never Dies The Rise and Threat of Global Antisemitism by Daniel Jonah Goldhagen by Daniel Jonah Goldhagen Daniel Jonah Goldhagen


message 38: by Sherry (new)

Sherry (directorsherry) | 129 comments Bryan wrote: "Awesome job on the questions, Sherry. Don't forget to bold the word question, so it is easier to read, like thus:

Question: type question here"


Unfortunately, my kindle doesn't have a bold key so I capitalized instead. I hope that will be okay. I love the answers I've gotten so far.


message 39: by Sherry (new)

Sherry (directorsherry) | 129 comments Dave wrote: "Sherry wrote: "QUESTION. The family seemed so strongly German before the rise of Hitler. Was the extent of the anti-Semitism a complete surprise to them?"

Hi Sherry. Just a quick note regarding th..."


Thanks for the recommendation, I'll look into it.
Sherry


message 40: by Kressel (new)

Kressel Housman | 917 comments I don't have any questions, but I just want to say that I'm so happy you're participating in the discussion with us. It adds so much depth and excitement, knowing that the author is here, reading our comments. May the book reach many, many people!


message 41: by Thomas (new)

Thomas Harding (thomasharding) | 45 comments Hi Kressel, thank you so much, it is a real pleasure to be taking part in this. And thank you for your very interesting review. - Thomas


message 42: by Sherry (last edited May 16, 2014 10:25AM) (new)

Sherry (directorsherry) | 129 comments Question:

Of Hanns brothers and Sisters, who is your great grandmother, (or father)?

Your book is one of the best I've ever read, and I plan to say so in my review.


message 43: by Thomas (new)

Thomas Harding (thomasharding) | 45 comments Hi Sherry. Thankyou for your kind words. My grandmother was Elsie, younger of Hanns' two sisters. - Thomas


message 44: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited May 17, 2014 05:11AM) (new)

Bentley | 44128 comments Mod
Question:

Hanns Hermann Alexander had a twin brother Paul as well as two sisters Bella and Elsie. Elsie was your grandmother. Can you tell us something about Paul, Bella and Elsie and just some highlights of their life story. Were Paul and Hanns similar in personalities and looks - did they follow the same career paths in life? Just curious.


message 45: by Thomas (new)

Thomas Harding (thomasharding) | 45 comments Hi Bentley.

Paul and Hanns were identical twins, most people could not, in fact still can not, tell them apart. They were very similar in their outlooks, fun-loving, eager to prank, family-centered, willing to do the work others did not wish to do, motivated by a strong sense of right and wrong.

But there were differences. Paul was more easy-going, he took like a little less seriously, he was willing to work a little less hard. Hanns was quicker to anger, was more determined, was the more responsible of the pair. He considered himself the elder brother, even though born only 15 minutes earlier.

After WWII, Paul bumped along from job to job, married, went to Canada for ten years, helped start a synagogue with other refugees in Toronto, and then returned to England, working as a jobbing carpenter without much direction, and filled with a certain aimlessness.

Bella lost her husband, Harold, at the war's end when a plane landed into his car (I am not sure what caused the accident). She remarried quickly and dedicated herself to being a stay-at-home mother, as we would now call it.

Elsie remained with her husband Eric, my grandfather, till he died in 1981. She also took care of the kids, before becoming a tour guide in England, ironically driving around elderly Germans and teaching them (often erroneously) about British history.

Hanns and Paul would often lunch together. Their greatest joy was to arrange gag send-offs for family weddings: a horse and cart for one, a fire engine for another, an enormous horse for a third (actually it was my father and uncle dressed in a giant horse costume, I walked behind with my cousin clearing up the 'poop') .

The four siblings always joined each other, with their children and grand-children, for religious holidays, birthdays and other celebrations. By the turn of the century family gatherings proved to be very busy and large affairs!


message 46: by Donna (new)

Donna (drspoon) Thomas wrote: "Hi Bentley.

Paul and Hanns were identical twins, most people could not, in fact still can not, tell them apart. They were very similar in their outlooks, fun-loving, eager to prank, family-center..."


Gosh, I loved having that bit of personal family history. Thanks!


message 47: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited May 17, 2014 01:36PM) (new)

Bentley | 44128 comments Mod
I am glad that I asked Thomas - what an amazing post. Who would have thought that someone would lose their husband at war's end from a plane landing on his car (horrendous).

I love the part about your grandmother being a tour guide for elderly Germans teaching them about British history (and not being quite up on it herself). I had a tremendous laugh over that. She must have been quite a bit of fun.

The twins sounded like they had quite a bit of fun even though from the sounds of it - Hanns did better career wise than Paul yet they were similar in many other ways.

Those family gatherings must have been wonderful.

Excellent post Thomas. Very much appreciated.


message 48: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited May 17, 2014 10:20PM) (new)

Bentley | 44128 comments Mod
This is a question and intro from Linda. Linda I have modified your question to fit the format for Thomas:

Linda stated:

Hi my name us Linda. I have always enjoyed reading history. I used to focus on the American Revolution. A few years ago I started to investigate my family history. I became interested in WWII learning about where my Father and Uncles served during the war.

I enjoy the personal aspect of this story.

I have one question for Mr.Harding.

Question: How did the rest of his family react to him investigating and writing the story?


message 49: by Thomas (new)

Thomas Harding (thomasharding) | 45 comments Hi Linda.

At first my family were reluctant. They were worried about dragging up all the old stories, hanging our dirty washing in public etc. 'What was the point?' they asked. Most of all, they didn't believe the story could be true.

But as I progressed, and was able to persuade them that Hanns had indeed arrested the Kommandant of Auschwitz, they lent their support.

In fact, I couldn't have completed the book without them. From one cousin I was handed two boxes of letters from Hanns and Paul written in the 1940s. From another, I was given photographs from the 1920s and 1930s. From a third, I received audio recordings with Hanns and his siblings.

Now, of course, they are delighted with the book and fully supportive, basking in its success, and persuading all their friends to buy a copy!


 ManOfLaBook.com (manoflabook) | 6 comments Question: Mr. Harding, were you surprised to find that Kommandant was not what we all assumed to be, a cold blooded psychopath, but a manager which took his management efficiency too far?


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