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Author Q&A > Dan Wells (Author of the Partials Sequence) Q&A Event--May 5-8th

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message 1: by Jenny, Always smiling! :-D (last edited May 09, 2014 08:25AM) (new)

Jenny (juliababyjen) | 12932 comments Mod
From May 5-8th, bestselling author Dan Wells (Author of The Partials Sequence) will be coming to our group to answer questions about his books, his life as an author, and about anything else you all can come up with!! So get ready for the fun and start thinking of some questions to ask him!

And if you haven't checked out his books yet, all your mods recommend them! They are wonderful post-apocalyptic/dystopian reads!

Partials (Partials, #1) by Dan Wells Fragments (Partials, #2) by Dan Wells Ruins (Partials Sequence, #3) by Dan Wells

Questions

1. Karen--What was your inspiration for the Partials Sequence?

2. Karen--There is aLOT of science in this series. What is your background? How long did the research take?

3. Lauren--Can you share some inspiration for this series with us?

4. Lauren--Did you have a playlist or soundtrack in mind for any characters or scenes?

5. Kritika--One of the things I noticed about the characters was how ethnically/temperamentally/socially diverse they are. How important is diversity to you and what do you draw from to portray all these different characters?

6. Kritika--Are there any other medical/heavily science-based dystopian novels that inspired you or that you would recommend?

7. David--Do you see there being partials in the real world some day? If so, how far in the future?

8. Levian--Will the lack of knowledge/interest in science make us feel any less engaged with the storyline?

9. Angela--Can you give me some idea of what type of science fiction that these stories contain?

10. Tracy--Were there any real life inspiration for any of the characters?

11. Tracy--Was 'Partials' always planned as a trilogy and how much of the plots for each of the books did plan out in advance when you started?

12. Jesse--What is your favorite book genre?

13. Lynn--I was sad for the trilogy to end. Will there be a slight off shoot, showing us what life is like for both the Partials and the humans now that the puzzle pieces have come together? (I'm trying not to give anything away for those who haven't read the books yet!).

14. Lynn--If not, are you working on anything new?

15. Karah--My question is, since you're a guy, why would you choose to write about a girl?

16. Cindy--about how long did it take you to finish writing Partials? How long did it take to then edit and publish?

17. Cindy--What is something you would tell aspiring authors that you wish someone had told you?

18. Harlee-- I would like to ask if the little girl in your profile picture is yours? She's adorable and I love her outfit! :)

19. Tommy--If you could credit only one writer, from any media, as your biggest writing inspiration, who would you pick?

20. Karen--Do you have any favorite fan moments?

21. Jen--I know you covered this somewhat in the other forum, but I would love to know (view spoiler)

22. JP--Do you have any advice for aspiring writers that don't know how to get started?

23. JP--Also, what were your favorite books growing up?

24. Meghan--The poem Marcus recites for the burial of Maija and Rob. Did you write it or was it a piece of poetry by someone else? It's really beautiful and perfect in the moment.

25. Jenny--I thought I'd ask you this hypothetical question, since Partials is all about saving what's left of humanity. Is humanity worth saving, and if so, why?

26. Karen--What does your typical day look like, Dan?



message 2: by Divya (new)

Divya Awesome! Can't wait for the Q and A to start!


Karen’s Library | 11320 comments Mod
I just did a reread of his first two books so I could read Ruins and absolutely loved this entire series!! I'm soooooo excited Dan is joining us!! Well done, Jenny!!! Woot woooooottttt!!!! :)


message 4: by David, Mr. Blue Eyes; He's the Best--Ain't no lie!! ;) (new)

David Estes (davidestesbooks) | 10713 comments Mod
Absolutely can't wait!!! The first book was really good, the second was amazing, and the third was crazy-awesome! Great all-around series!


message 5: by Tracy (new)

Tracy Fenwick | 15 comments I love this series!!! I'm just can't believe I have to wait until July to read the last one - it won't be sent to my Kindle until then :( I've had it pre-ordered for ages!!


message 6: by David, Mr. Blue Eyes; He's the Best--Ain't no lie!! ;) (new)

David Estes (davidestesbooks) | 10713 comments Mod
It's not out in the UK yet, Tracy? Ruins has been out in the U.S. for a while already, it's an awesome book!


message 7: by Tracy (new)

Tracy Fenwick | 15 comments David wrote: "It's not out in the UK yet, Tracy? Ruins has been out in the U.S. for a while already, it's an awesome book!"

I think it came out in paperback about a month or so ago but the Kindle edition isn't out until July. I have about 70 or so other books to keep me busy until then!! I preferred Fragments to Partials so I'm hoping that Ruins is better than Fragments - I loved the direction it was heading.


message 8: by David, Mr. Blue Eyes; He's the Best--Ain't no lie!! ;) (new)

David Estes (davidestesbooks) | 10713 comments Mod
Oh OK! Well, hope July comes quickly for you!


Karen’s Library | 11320 comments Mod
Hi Dan!! *waves exuberantly* I know I've been waiting for this Q&A forever and I know lots of others who have been as well! Welcome!!! :)

What was your inspiration for the Partials Sequence?

There is aLOT of science in this series. What is your background? How long did the research take?



message 10: by Lauren (new)

Lauren Stoolfire | 2047 comments Hi Dan! Thanks for visiting our group. I'm really looking forward to reading the Partials Sequence.

Can you share some inspiration for this series with us?

Did you have a playlist or soundtrack in mind for any characters or scenes?



message 11: by Kritika (new)

Kritika (spidersilksnowflakes) I love this series! I haven't read Ruins yet but I am looking forward to it :)

One of the things I noticed about the characters was how ethnically/temperamentally/socially diverse they are. How important is diversity to you and what do you draw from to portray all these different characters?

Are there any other medical/heavily science-based dystopian novels that inspired you or that you would recommend?



message 12: by David, Mr. Blue Eyes; He's the Best--Ain't no lie!! ;) (new)

David Estes (davidestesbooks) | 10713 comments Mod
Welcome Dan, it's a real honor having you in our group! I thought the Partials Sequence was one of the most inventive/unique dystopian series I've read.

Do you see there being partials in the real world some day? If so, how far in the future?


message 13: by Levian (new)

Levian hi Dan! i'm choosing this series to be my BOTM! but hearing that it included a lot of science references had me very concerned since i'm not a huge fan of science fiction.

Will the lack of knowledge/interest in science make us feel any less engaged with the storyline?


message 14: by Angela(demonsangel) (last edited May 05, 2014 04:14AM) (new)

Angela(demonsangel) Fitzgerald (demonsangel) | 74 comments Hello Dan, I haven't read any of the books yet, listen is better because I have all that's available on Audible. I have heard great things about these books and I can't wait to start. However, I'm not big on sci-fi. Is there a lot of science in these books. I understand there's a variety of science fiction out there. Can you give me some idea of what type of science fiction that these stories contain? Thank you Dan and I will listen to the audio books regardless. I would've started them but I have a huge list of audio books to listen to and review.


message 15: by Tracy (new)

Tracy Fenwick | 15 comments Hi Dan, I love the series so far and really looking forward to reading Ruins.

Were there any real life inspiration for any of the characters?
Was 'Partials' always planned as a trilogy and how much of the plots for each of the books did plan out in advance when you started?


message 16: by Jesse (new)

Jesse | 166 comments Hi Dan ! Amazing book series

What is your favorite book genre?


message 17: by Lynn (new)

Lynn Worton Hi Dan,

I loved the series! Partials was like "whoa", Fragments was like "whoa Nelly!" and Ruins was "Whoo Hoo!" :D

I was sad for the trilogy to end. Will there be a slight off shoot, showing us what life is like for both the Partials and the humans now that the puzzle pieces have come together? (I'm trying not to give anything away for those who haven't read the books yet!).
If not, are you working on anything new?


message 18: by Lynn (new)

Lynn Worton Tracy wrote: "I love this series!!! I'm just can't believe I have to wait until July to read the last one - it won't be sent to my Kindle until then :( I've had it pre-ordered for ages!!"

Tracy, I'm in the UK and couldn't wait to read Ruins, so I downloaded it in Audio Book. Why we can get the book in audio and not Kindle yet is a slight mystery, but I would suggest if you can't wait, then do the same. The book is awesome!


message 19: by Karah (new)

Karah (kasey9) | 7 comments Hi! I just want to say how much I loved Partials! I just started reading Fragments.

My question is, since you're a guy, why would you choose to write about a girl?

I love it when I find a male author who actually comes up with a realistic heroine!

Thanks


message 20: by Dan (new)

Dan Wells Hi, everyone! I am delighted to be here--thank you so much for inviting me to this Q&A. I sincerely hopes that my As are half as engaging and clever as your Qs :)


message 21: by Dan (last edited May 05, 2014 01:21PM) (new)

Dan Wells 1. Karen--What was your inspiration for the Partials Sequence?

3. Lauren--Can you share some inspiration for this series with us?

I had three main inspirations for this, that all jumbled together and mished and mashed and became the Partials series.

a) I've always wanted to write a post-apocalyptic series: a few lone survivors living in the carcass of our dead civilization, scrounging for what little resources remain. I love that stuff. I just didn't have any idea HOW to use that setting at first, so I stuck it in the back of my brain and let it percolate.

b) I love Battlestar Galactica, and the cylons who look like humans, and the deep questions those stories were able to ask about what it means to be human. Of course, the thing about writers is that every time we see something we like we think, "that's awesome, but I would have done it differently," so this was my chance to do it differently--not necessarily better or worse, just differently.

c) I love Hermione Granger, and it always bugged me how she was the smart one who solved all the problems and figured out all the solutions and then Harry got all the credit. I want to write a story where the hot-headed nerdy girl got to be the hero of her own story.

Take those three elements, blend them up, and add RM as the final piece of the puzzle that ties it all together and makes it work. That's how it all started :)


message 22: by Dan (new)

Dan Wells 2. Karen--There is a LOT of science in this series. What is your background? How long did the research take?

I do not have a science background. (Well, not past high school. I got a 5 on the AP Biology test, so hooray for that coming in handy!) What I do have is a strong science FICTION background, and a love of learning, so while I've never actually studied viruses at a professional or collegiate level I'm perfectly happy sitting down with the Internet or a science book and just reading for days. I love science. We live in a science fiction world--we have a robot on mars, who sends messages to a supercomputer in my pocket. Science pervades every part of our lives. If you don't take the time to learn at least a little about science, and how stuff works and why, you're not going to understand the world you live in.

I had to do a lot of research for this series, most of it in either virology or decay. There's a lot of genetics in the book as well, and I've studied that extensively for some other books, but in Partials the genetics mostly boils down to "look, magic!" By which I mean that the characters never USE genetic engineering to solve any problems, so I don't have to help the readers understand what it is and how it works. The characters do use a lot of virology, so I had to give the readers a basic grounding in that, but it's nothing my ten-year-old couldn't handle, so I figured the rest of you would get along fine :)


message 23: by Dan (new)

Dan Wells 4. Lauren--Did you have a playlist or soundtrack in mind for any characters or scenes?

Sort of, but not in the way I've used playlists for some of my other books. A lot of the time I'll use specific songs when I write, and I kind of did for Partials (Kira's theme song is "Gimme Shelter" by The Rolling Stones), but for the most part my playlist for this series was not a carefully curated list of perfect songs. All three books, start to finish, were written on a steady diet of The Silversun Pickups, including every album and bonus track, shuffled together on iTunes. All day every day. And I never got sick of it, because they are AWESOME.


message 24: by Dan (new)

Dan Wells This is fun, and I'll pop in later to answer some more. Keep the great questions coming!


message 25: by cindy ♡ (new)

cindy ♡ about how long did it take you to finish writing Partials? How long did it take to then edit and publish?

What is something you would tell aspiring authors that you wish someone had told you?


message 26: by Harlee (new)

Harlee | 1583 comments Hi Dan! My question actually does not relate to the books at all. I would like to ask if the little girl in your profile picture is yours? She's adorable and I love her outfit! :)


message 27: by Tommy (new)

Tommy Hancock (tommyhancock) | 954 comments If you could credit only one writer, from any media, as your biggest writing inspiration, who would you pick?


message 28: by Donna (new)

Donna (donanicole) | 897 comments I just downloaded Partials today from my library and am so excited to read it! I see you like my very fave TV show, Battlestar Galactica so I know I will love your book. Since I haven't read it yet, sorry I don't have any questions. Yet.


message 29: by Dan (new)

Dan Wells 5. Kritika--One of the things I noticed about the characters was how ethnically/temperamentally/socially diverse they are. How important is diversity to you and what do you draw from to portray all these different characters?

Diversity is very important to me, because I like my characters to reflect my readers. We all need to be able to see ourselves in our fiction. I read a quote once by Geena Davis, who was talking about the massive disparity between men and women in Hollywood--only 30% of all speaking roles in movies are women, and when you look at lead roles it's only 16%. She said that all it would take to fix this was two things: first, every time a script says 'a crowd,' replace it with 'a crowd of men and women;' second, go through all the speaking roles in the script and make every other one a woman. Those two simple changes, which are really the easiest things in the whole world, would rock the entire foundation of our movie industry. I've thought a lot about that, and how easy it is for a writer to 'cast' his or her characters, and I decided that I was going to do it, not just for gender but for race as well. I went through the manuscript I was working on, counted the characters, and realized that I was defaulting to white men pretty much every time I needed to invent a new character. I started changing the genders and races, doing my best to mix things up, and realized that suddenly the book was far more interesting and vibrant than it had ever been before. I'm refining this process as I go, trying the make the characters feel different instead of just looking different; the new series I have coming out next year is all about a Mexican family in a cyberpunk Los Angeles. It's incredibly fun to write.


message 30: by Dan (new)

Dan Wells 6. Kritika--Are there any other medical/heavily science-based dystopian novels that inspired you or that you would recommend?

Off the top of my head, I don't know if I know of any specifically medical dystopias, or dystopias that use science in the same way Partials does. If you're willing to look at some broader science fiction, not just dystopias, there's been some very good medical stuff by Michael Crichton and F. Paul Wilson, both of whom are doctors. I'd recommend The Sphere or Andromeda Strain as a good starting point. If you really want to get into the science side of SF try The Fantastic Voyage, about a group of scientists (and one secret agent) who get miniaturized and injected into a man's bloodstream in a tiny submarine, so they can travel through his body and destroy a brain tumor before it kills him. It's a very unique look at biology from the other side.


message 31: by Dan (new)

Dan Wells 7. David--Do you see there being partials in the real world some day? If so, how far in the future?

We're still a very long way off, but eventually it will be inevitable. We already have doctors using 3D printers to make organs for transplant patients; that sounds like crazy science fiction, but it already exists. Our level of technology is advancing at an incredible rate. It's only a matter of time, in my opinion, before someone starts putting all the pieces together to print or grow entire organisms, and those organisms will grow increasingly complex and intelligent as our capacity to create them increases. I suspect my fictional estimate of the mid 2050s is too ambitious; it might be a few hundred years, but it will definitely happen.


message 32: by Dan (new)

Dan Wells 8. Levian--Will the lack of knowledge/interest in science make us feel any less engaged with the storyline?

If I have done my job correctly, no :)

Partials, and the first book in particular, is about a girl trying to cure a disease, and her success or failure depend very heavily on her ability to find that cure. There's adventure and explosions and betrayals and thick tension between the characters, and that's all very fun, but I knew when I was outlining it that one of the big climaxes for the story had to be that cure. And if "finding the cure" is one of my character's benchmarks for success, I needed her to really be able to find the cure, instead of just talk about finding the cure. Imagine a mystery story where the detective doesn't ever actually find any clues or do any investigating; that would be weird and pointless. Kira's search for the cure is like a mystery, and solving that mystery means doing science, and since I never wanted to write the phrase "Then Kira did some science," I took the time to work out exactly what the disease was, and what the cure was, and how they worked, and how Kira could solve the puzzle. Then, because I know not everyone is a big crazy nerd like I am, I took the time to simplify that whole process, and to make sure I explained it all as simply and understandably as I could. A proper medical mystery is still pointless if it's so technical or boring that nobody bothers to read it.

I think that even if you don't like science, you'll like Partials. Kira's search for a cure is engaging and full of character tension (and even romantic tension) whether or not you care about the cells she's studying under her microscope. And if you're really, really not into science, reassure yourself that the first book has more of it than either of the others, so if you can make it through that you're fine for the rest of the series :)


message 33: by Dan (new)

Dan Wells 9. Angela--Can you give me some idea of what type of science fiction that these stories contain?

These stories contain AWESOME science fiction. But since you're probably looking for a more informative answer than that, here you go:

1) In terms of science, the Partials series deals very heavily with virology and genetic engineering, though as I said above you don't need to know anything about either to enjoy the story. I also talk a bit about ecology and decay, though not in any great detail; the characters live in Long Island, New York, after 99.99% of the Earth's population has died of a plague, so they have to deal with simple things like weather and shelter and illness and rot in a way most of us never do. They scavenge for food and clothes, and build their homes in the ruined shells of all the buildings we left behind.

2) If you'd like to read some of my other books, The Hollow City is an adult thriller that goes deeply into the science of schizophrenia and psychology. The John Cleaver series, starting with I Am Not A Serial Killer, is a YA thriller that has a lot of psychology and mortuary/forensic science.

3) If you're asking more about the science fiction than the science, the Partials series is basically a cross between dystopia, post-apocalypse adventure, and medical mystery. I consider the three books of the series to each have a different genre: Partials is a dystopia story, Fragments is a quest story, and Ruins is an war story.


Karen’s Library | 11320 comments Mod
Wow, GREAT answers Dan!! I'm fangirling all over the place here. Speaking of fangirling -

Do you have any favorite fan moments?


message 35: by Jen (last edited May 07, 2014 09:16AM) (new)

Jen (jenwesner) | 1222 comments Hey Dan!

I know you covered this somewhat in the other forum, but I would love to know (view spoiler)


message 36: by Kritika (new)

Kritika (spidersilksnowflakes) Dan wrote: "7. David--Do you see there being partials in the real world some day? If so, how far in the future?

We're still a very long way off, but eventually it will be inevitable. We already have doctors ..."


I'm a bioengineering student and one of our professors works on regenerating organs! It's really crazy how far we've come in terms of medical technology. It's also interesting to see from the engineering perspective how complicated our bodies are and how difficult it is to replicate their "machinery". I think that's part of why I love this series so much - it deals with technology that I find really interesting and might someday be working on.


message 37: by Peri (new)

Peri | 678 comments Hi!!! I'm so excited that you're doing this!!

I know people have asked similar questions already, but my question is:
Do you have any advice for aspiring writers that don't know how to get started?

Also, what were your favorite books growing up?



message 38: by Dan (new)

Dan Wells 10. Tracy--Were there any real life inspiration for any of the characters?

Sort of? But not really. Marcus is a combination of a lot of my friends from college, and a good dose of myself, but I couldn't really point to any specific element and say "that comes from my friend X."

The big exception, of course, are the two scouts in the first book, Skinny and Scruffy, who are based on my friends Steve and Nick. I like to put them in every series I write, and Steve always lives and Nick always dies. I don't know why, it just makes me laugh.


message 39: by Dan (new)

Dan Wells 11. Tracy--Was 'Partials' always planned as a trilogy and how much of the plots for each of the books did plan out in advance when you started?

It was always planned as a trilogy, and I knew the broad strokes of each plot from the beginning: I knew how each book would end, and how the series would end, and where each of the main characters would go and what they'd accomplish. But there's a lot of leeway in the there to move things around. In Ruins, for example, I always knew that it was going to snow, but the other major disaster was unplanned. I set up a catastrophe in book 2, with the plan of having Kira avert it in book 3, but the more I got into the outline the more I realized that it would be way more interesting an unexpected (and solve several other plot problems) to just let the disaster happen. I think the book is much stronger because of it.


message 40: by Dan (new)

Dan Wells 12. Jesse--What is your favorite book genre?

I write thrillers and science fiction, but most of what I read is science fiction, fantasy, and historical fiction--if I had to pick a favorite, it would be historical fiction. One thing a lot of people don't expect is that I don't tend to read much YA--a bit, here and there, but very little.


message 41: by Dan (new)

Dan Wells 13. Lynn--I was sad for the trilogy to end. Will there be a slight off shoot, showing us what life is like for both the Partials and the humans now that the puzzle pieces have come together? (I'm trying not to give anything away for those who haven't read the books yet!)

If I write more Partials books--which I don't plan to do, but you never know--the thing that interests me the most is the idea of jumping ahead one or two or even ten generations, and show the society after the Partials have become fully integrated, and the people have started to establish cities of their own instead of living in the ruins of the old world. I'd love to take Kira's granddaughter on a voyage across the sea, for example, to see what's going on in Europe or Asia or Africa. I want to see what happens to the Watchdogs, and if they ever manage to build a society of their own. I want to explore what kind of new equilibrium the world settles into, filled with ancient ruins and genetic monstrosities and a hybrid human/Partial species. That sounds fascinating to me.


message 42: by Dan (new)

Dan Wells 14. Lynn--If not [writing more Partials books], are you working on anything new?

I have two new series under contract right now. The first is with Tor, my thriller/horror publisher, where I'm writing a new trilogy of John Cleaver books. The first of these books is called (tentatively) The Devil's Only Friend, and comes out in Spring of 2015.

The other series I'm writing is a new YA science fiction from Harper, the same whole team that put together Partials. It's called Mirador, and follows a teenage girl named Marisa, a hacker and professional gamer, as she navigates the deadly underworld of 2050 Los Angeles. It's part cyberpunk, part thriller, part YA romance. I'm so excited for it, I can't even tell you. The first book is called Bluescreen, and it comes out in Fall of 2015.


message 43: by Dan (new)

Dan Wells 15. Karah--My question is, since you're a guy, why would you choose to write about a girl?

Why not?


message 44: by Tommy (new)

Tommy Hancock (tommyhancock) | 954 comments Dan wrote: "15. Karah--My question is, since you're a guy, why would you choose to write about a girl?

Why not?"


Perfect answer.


message 45: by Dan (new)

Dan Wells 15. Karah--My question is, since you're a guy, why would you choose to write about a girl?

Just kidding, I know you want a better answer than that :)

The most simple reason, getting right to the root of the matter, is that I have two daughters, and I want them to have good role models--I want them to be able to see themselves in their books, and be proud of what they see. I looked at the genre, wished there was more of what I wanted them to read, and eventually decided "Aren't I a writer? I'll just write some." So I did.

I think the issue of gender in novels and other media is made out to be a bigger hassle than it really is. It's important to do, but it's not hard. At the most basic level, like I said in an earlier question, all you really have to do is change the name and the pronouns; don't worry about writing a "girl," write a "person," and everything else will fall into place. I didn't set out to write Samm as a "boy," so why treat Kira any differently? We're not defined by our gender, but by who we are and what we want and what we do to get it.


message 46: by Dan (new)

Dan Wells 16. Cindy--about how long did it take you to finish writing Partials? How long did it take to then edit and publish?

Partials is a slightly weird case, because I sold it before I wrote it, and we were on a very tight schedule. I average two books a years, so say around 6 months each, including all the outlining, writing, and revising. Partials was a rush, so it took about five months; Ruins I had more time, so I took about seven. Once I'm done with the manuscript and turn it in, there's usually another six months at least before it gets printed and lands on a shelf. I finished Fragments during ComicCon two years ago, sometime in July, but it wasn't released until February of the following year. That's, what, seven months? The publisher uses that time to do a round or two of copy edits, and then several rounds of proofreading, and of course lots of promotion--they send copies to booksellers, and show it off at trade shows, and that sort of thing.


message 47: by Dan (new)

Dan Wells 17. Cindy--What is something you would tell aspiring authors that you wish someone had told you?

Allow yourself to write a bad book. Don't expect your first thing to be amazing, because it won't be: take the time to practice, and write a lot of stories and books, and the harder you work the better you get.


message 48: by Mkittysamom (new)

Mkittysamom (mkittysabkworm) | 77 comments Dan ,
The poem Marcus recites for the burial of Maija and Rob. Did you write it or was it a piece of poetry by someone else? It's really beautiful and perfect in the moment.


Angela(demonsangel) Fitzgerald (demonsangel) | 74 comments Dan, Wow, you definitely answered my question. I did think that there might be a dystopian type book genre or apocalyptic type to the books. I didn't realize that each book has a different genre take all together. I'm not sure I wrote that right but they do sound interesting. Your other books do as well. Maybe you'd consider adding all your books to Audible one day. I think I can speak for many in this group but we do have some audio book lovers in this group. I am completely hooked. I have about 3500 audio books in my library since 2012. I mostly listen unless it's not available on Audible. Don't get me wrong, I buy the physical book/books. My sixteen year old will only read the actual book and I love the YA genre.


message 50: by Jenny, Always smiling! :-D (new)

Jenny (juliababyjen) | 12932 comments Mod
@Our members--great questions, guys!

@Dan--I love reading all the answers, this is awesome!

I thought I'd ask you this hypothetical question, since Partials is all about saving what's left of humanity. Is humanity worth saving, and if so, why?


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