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Foreworld Saga Authors > 1, 2, 3, What’re We Write’n For?

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message 1: by C.B. Matson (new)

C.B. Matson [Sorry Country Joe] I’m gonna kick this one off with a review of my own Works in Progress and invite others to do the same. At this moment I’ve just about got 110k words into Cloven Earth – Cnán is crossing the Ustyurt Plateau (look it up) in the company of a runaway Romani boy (with an enormous crush on the unattainable…). A more thoroughly edited version of Broken Sky will come out soon as Red Messenger #1. I’ve got an outline for the concluding RM #3, Moonlight and Darkness that should (hope, hope, hope) be ready for release in about a year.

After that? Well, I’m looking at about 3k words into AKA Melissa Schwartz that will likely go up as a short or a novella; and scrounging around in a buncha old thumb drives I found an ancient 64 meg stick (no shit) with 15k words into a forgotten adventure novel. My man, Jack Gator (okay, corny… corny) may yet live.

Then there is that half ream of double spaced pica in a folder next to my bed. Sooo 70s, gawd I can barely stand it. But, hmmm… spiffed up, tie-dyed head band, ‘62 V-dub and all, it might just go as a period-piece (meh, or not). But I’m not tell’n my secret project, though (‘cus it’s a secret, duh); but think steampunk touching four (count ‘em) four centuries. Okay, enough about me…

So, sword swing’n word slingers… what’cha got? Somebody’s gotta pick up a few of those spun-off Mongoliad heroes and take ‘em out for an adventure.


message 2: by Mike, Vor Dweeb (last edited Mar 03, 2016 08:54AM) (new)

Mike Voss | 60 comments Mod
I too have a secret (Foreworld) project, but it's a long way off from realization.

First off, as all our mods already know, is the never-ending Foreworld novella grown to short novel length, Crux Passages, in which an English knight who has scoffed at the vor is forced from his skeptical views by having it thrust upon him unexpectedly and in a novel way. A binder, a shield-maiden, and a ronin join him in the quest that arises, set in 1296. As I just tried to rewrite the first chapter and entered into a phase of self-loathing for the new material, and have a few chapters to wrap up in the latter half, all I can say is, Coming to Kindle Worlds...Sometime.

Once I regain a sense of respect for whatever prose begins it and finish, next up is the sequel, Forest for the Trees, with yet another take on England's most famous folk hero - only mine is a bit of a Charles Manson type, for want of any better description. I expect that one to go faster, so that I'll have time for a third, and totally original novella called Sphynx this year.

Sphynx introduces a demigod son of Aphrodite who survives to the present day along with an unusual sidekick, opening with an encounter with a sphynx and moving on to describe his time with a group Pythagoras founded, setting up an antagonist who was once Alex's best friend and lover. Its sequels include a novella and my first attempt at a full novel. These will take me through next year and probably into 2018.

Another sequel, set much later, to CruxP and Forest could work its way in between a couple of them. And 2 more Foreworld stories would follow the Sphynx stories.

Should I live through all that, two science fiction stories, one novel length, and a straight up horror novel would follow eventually, and a fantasy involving books that are more than they seem pretty much wraps up my file of ideas with enough potential to flesh out.


message 3: by Michael (new)

Michael Lussier | 22 comments Mod
As you all know, I’m hugely impatient to read both Cloven Earth and Crux Passages. I’m delighted to hear that steady progress is being made.


I had fully intended to write a proper swashbuckling Renaissance Era Foreworld dust-up, but my imagination rebelled (as it is sometimes wont to do).

Instead, I came up with three Victorian/Edwardian Adventures:

STORY #1 - Limehouse Reach

Limehouse Reach is a satire of all those virulently racist “Yellow Peril” pulp adventures that were popular in the 1910s. This is the first KindleWorlds idea that I pitched to Tony Wolf in June 2014. At the time, I couldn’t see any way to make the story work. I have since discovered a fun side-trail that allows me to move foreword with it. (Incidentally, the Dog Pack gang and the raid at the end of Isle of Dogs were cannibalized from Limehouse Reach.)

In 1900 Asians could still be considered The Other. They were novel, exotic and incomprehensibly mysterious. The Press believed Asian émigrés to be a threat, frequently referring to them as the vanguard of a cultural invasion - although, at that time, Chinese immigrants only numbered half of one percent of the foreign-born population of Britain. Their alien inscrutability - and the haughty way in which they resisted acculturation - made it easy to view Asians as sinister. Today, of course, the stereotype has altered due to increased globalization. Chinese immigrants as a whole are now often viewed as relatively mundane and hard-working folks, although perhaps a bit too striving and pushy. Different ages, different biases.

On the other hand, from our historical vantage point, the Edwardian power structure has been transformed into perfect villain material. How could Doctor Fu Manchu ever measure up to Mister John Bull and his arrogant authoritarianism, international brinkmanship, colonial machinations, and casual genocides.

If all goes according to plan, this story will include Miss Judith Lee, cane fights, a chase through dark and labyrinthine warehouses, a Mansonesque alternate-universe Rudyard Kipling, a goddess whose features combine elements of Britannia and Kali, the threat of human sacrifice, a clever escape from a shipboard torture cell, the last living student of Master Assassin Kawakami Gensai, and the comical machinations of Sax Rohmer.

God willing, none of it will be insanely offensive or insensitive.


… AND, BY THE BY, …

It seems to me that there was a lot of confusion amongst the Foreworld fanbase as to how the Bartitsu Club / Suffrajitsu Amazons fit into the tradition of OMVI knights. I’d like to clear that up a bit by focusing a couple of stories on Sir Richard Burton and the inner circle of the Kernoozer's Club. These tales will offer enough clues for the average Foreworld Fanatic to pick up on the very definite links between these organizations.



STORY #2 - DURENDAL
Durendal involves Captain Sir Richard Francis Burton, a sacred French artifact, the ‘Urabi revolt of 1882, a train heist in Marseille, a one-legged swordsman, an attempt to establish a Nizari Ismaili (Assassin) caliphate within the Ottoman Empire, and the battle of Tel el-Kebir.

STORY #3 - THE BUTCHER’S TOWER
Butcher’s Tower takes place in June of 1894, and involves a royalist coup in Paris. This tale is exceptionally pulply - Satanism, a potent relic of French monarchy, proto-fascism, an accursed bricked-up church tower, a grave-robber’s guild, a disfigured opera phantom, and knife-fights in the catacombs.


Outside of the Foreworld, I have nine very promising ideas in various stages of development. Because I write with the speed and dexterity of a depressed glacier, the less said about them the better… For now.


message 4: by Mike, Vor Dweeb (new)

Mike Voss | 60 comments Mod
I am equally anxious to read the follow up to The Broken Sky, Durendal, and The Butcher's Tower. That link between the OMVI and the Amazons definitely needs to be explained more fully, although I admit I may be even more eager to meet your one-legged swordsman.

I am also very intrigued by Mr. Matson's centuries-spanning steampunk concept. Like the Foreworld itself, our ideas reach into many eras. As I suppose they should :-)


message 5: by C.B. Matson (new)

C.B. Matson Okay, Mike... no more TV until you've finished your homework, uh, Crux, jus' make it happen.

Michael... Global warming is here. Melt that glacier. I wanna read Limehouse Reach now. But jeez, Sax Rohmer has always been one of my favorites. Racism aside, his tales of exotic assassins, poison, mind altering drugs, and the forever unreachable Karamaneh [sigh] are among my strongest writing inspirations. The good (bad) Dr. was one of the most honorable of villains... in the end, almost redeeming himself.

When you get to Story #2 we should correspond. I've got the Nizari figuring strongly in Moonlight and I could plant a bit of foreshadow or an artifact that would tie into Durendal if you want.


message 6: by Mike, Vor Dweeb (new)

Mike Voss | 60 comments Mod
C.B. Matson wrote: "Okay, Mike... no more TV until you've finished your homework, uh, Crux, jus' make it happen.

Ironically, I cut down my Netflix viewing dramatically to allow more time for writing. (I've had Mad Max: Fury Road sitting here for coming on two months now!) Work just wipes me out though, so writing is almost always done on my days off and the workday evenings devoted to passive endeavors, mostly reading. After trying again and again to find that writing energy after work, I've resigned myself and am looking to boost my stamina on the off days so I don't allow myself to be content with 1000-2000 words. It's physically tough (arthritis and a creaky back), but it is what it is. That shouldn't stop you or Michael, or anyone else for that matter, from encouraging me to keep my ass in the chair though. I don't mind constructive nags that remind me people want to see this through :-) I even begged Michael to bark at me every day, but he just keeps wagging his tail :-)

I could plant a bit of foreshadow or an artifact that would tie into Durendal

Really hoping you guys can coordinate this. The subtle links between stories in the canonical Foreworld are a feature I'd love to see carried over into the Kindle Worlds realm - and in fact my secret Foreworld project, though it may not see the light of day for some time, may have a link to Durendal as well!


message 7: by Michael (new)

Michael Lussier | 22 comments Mod
Goddamnit, my whole afternoon is shot now. All I can do is think about Jack Gator. I’m writing films about him in my head. This is really too much fun!

I’m picturing Jack Gator as a Southern-Fried Buckaroo Banzai. Like, Doc Savage if it were written by Jim Thompson, Don Pendleton, Jimmy Buffett, and Nunnally Johnson. The cast would include Warren Oates, Harry Dean Stanton, Ben Johnson, Jerry Reed, Joe Don Baker, and Tom Laughlin.

Jack Gator is a polymath, born far below the Mason-Dixon line. His mother was a theoretical physicist. His father was a Texas Ranger. Jack has been a Marine, a martial artist, county coroner, inventor, test pilot, tech entrepreneur and Muscle Shoals recording artist. He operates out of a highly restricted compound/laboratory/private airfield in the middle of the Okefenokee Swamp. Jack spends his days solving insoluble crimes and physics problems. Jack can face down any obstacle with his brains, country charm and physical prowess. Voodoo cultists, alien invaders, Dixie Mafia assassins, zombie outbreaks. No problem is too great.

Jack is aided in his endeavors by the Honky-Tonk Cavaliers:

Mountain Dew - a moonshiner/industrial chemist/explosives genius

Maynard Hayashi - a bare-knuckle fighter and engineering wizard

Bandit - the devilishly charming mechanic, driver, and high-stakes gambler

Grizz - a hulking bodyguard and celebrated defense attorney

... and Jack’s luscious Cajun-Creole girlfriend TexArcana.

You guys really are a bad influence on me! How am I supposed to focus when you keep stuffing mind-worms into my ears like this?! ;-)


message 8: by Mike, Vor Dweeb (new)

Mike Voss | 60 comments Mod
And behold the wonders as Michael does what he does!
I've seen him go on like this on Twitter for at least an hour.
Maybe Jack Gator needs to be licensed to KW so he can flesh this out. Won't take more than a day, I'll bet!


message 9: by Michael (new)

Michael Lussier | 22 comments Mod
I should mention that I view Nayland Smith as an unreliable narrator. Fu Manchu is definitely a hero. He was trying to kill Mussolini and Hitler - much to Smith's horror - as early as 1933! These are anti-imperialist stealth narratives.


message 10: by Michael (new)

Michael Lussier | 22 comments Mod
I would love to include artifacts and foreshadowing in DURENDAL. I've already made references to Sidequests by Mark and M. Harold Page.


message 11: by C.B. Matson (new)

C.B. Matson Okay, entirely cool!! Mind worm, mind worm? Oh, gawd, this is so messing with my day.

Damn, Mike is entirely right: ...subtle links between stories in the canonical Foreworld are a feature I'd love to see carried over into the Kindle Worlds realm... We have an opportunity to build that interlink into all of our stories. I mean, there's no reason we can't slip a link into an existing tale and jam it back up on KW just like it was an edit. When I issue the next revision of Broken I'm going to plant a knife that needs to reappear in Cloven. Why not back-link it to Crux as well... I mean, if not now, then later is cool.

Michael, dammit, you've managed to hack my antique thumb drive. I know how you got in; it was some kind of trojan in that twitter pic of Diana Rigg. Thank you very much Mr. Finch!

Yeah, ten years ago I left Jack on the beach in Guam with a bounty on his head. Poor bastard's been sitting there ever since, pining for the dusky Ms. TexArcana (She's gone completly feral. He has to traipse out'n the swump an' catch that wummin if he's even gonna see 'er).

I'd love to give Jack to you, backstory and all. But hell, you'd just go an' leave him on that beach for another ten years.


message 12: by Mike, Vor Dweeb (new)

Mike Voss | 60 comments Mod
Damn, Mike is entirely right: ...subtle links between stories in the canonical Foreworld are a feature I'd love to see carried over into the Kindle Worlds realm... We have an opportunity to build that interlink into all of our stories. I mean, there's no reason we can't slip a link into an existing tale and jam it back up on KW just like it was an edit."

Insidious. Brilliantly insidious!
A year or two after numerous edits, I see new reviewers talking about the links and earlier readers going "Huh? How did I miss that!"

The sword Durendal already gets a mention in Crux Passages, and I'll work a bit not to let it get edited out as the battle cry "Alalazu!' was. If either of you have specific ideas about links that might be appropriate to this story or Forest for the Trees the near future would be a good time to apprise me of your thoughts. We could have some fun with this while providing coherence and continuity across our Foreworld stories.


message 13: by Michael (last edited Mar 04, 2016 09:56AM) (new)

Michael Lussier | 22 comments Mod
* ...subtle links between stories in the canonical Foreworld are a feature I'd love to see carried over into the Kindle Worlds realm... We have an opportunity to build that interlink into all of our stories.*

I have already made subtle references to other Sidequests in the three stories I’m working on. I’d love to add more. These details reinforce worldbuilding.

I’ve made mention of William Marshall and Robert Dudley of Leicester - both of them tied up in OMVI shenanigans.

The Clovis sword ended up in the hands of the (fictional) Marchese d’Altavilla, an aristocrat from the Italian branch of the Hauteville family (from Scott James Magner’s Sidequests).

An early draft of Durendal began with a quotation from “France in the Time of Legendary Kings” (Francogallia in Fabulosus Aetate Regum) by a historian named Lazare de Rievaulx (the Cistercian monk of The Beast of Calatrava). I even added a scholarly footnote: “These references to magical swords are, of course, ahistorical; the stuff of folklore. Lazare himself understood this, being a very subtle ironist. He is best known for his attempts to inject Menippean satire into chivalric poetry. In many ways, he was a precursor of Cervantes. La Bestia de Calatrava, Rievaulx’s chansons de geste about the Iberian knight Ramiro Ibáñez de Tolosa, is a brilliant indictment of the Knights Templar and the interventionist policies of Pope Innocent III.”

The fact that the Foreworld freely mixes factual (Wikipedia-able) history with fictional détournement adds to the depth of the whole. The three of us casually repeating and confirming details will definitely mess with the heads of attentive readers. After all, in this manner was The Necronomicon born.

I’ll try to give you some details from my three stories a little later in the day. Have to run now. Doctor's appointment.

… ALSO…

We've spent quite a bit of time talking about Canon. A lifetime of genre fandom has convinced me that many wonderful ideas often enter a franchise surreptitiously, at a grass roots level, seeping into the spongy Canon until it reaches a saturation point, at which time these ideas become fait accompli. A king only rules because his sovereignty isn't questioned. Canon becomes Canon because it is repeated without disputation.


message 14: by Mark, Canon Nerd (new)

Mark Teppo (markteppo) | 12 comments Mod
>> Canon becomes Canon because it is repeated without disputation.

Word.


message 15: by Michael (last edited Mar 09, 2016 11:00AM) (new)

Michael Lussier | 22 comments Mod
* ...subtle links between stories in the canonical Foreworld are a feature I'd love to see carried over into the Kindle Worlds realm... We have an opportunity to build that interlink into all of our stories.*

*I’ll try to give you some details from my three stories a little later in the day.*

As promised, here is some information from DURENDAL. This blade is completely the product of my own imagination, having no relation to any existing historical relic. The plausible details (about the sword, it's history and the languages involved) are as correct as my research can make them. At this point, the religious politics and legend of Roland are more important to my story than the weapon which signifies them.


Durendal is an early tenth-century 'gaddhjalt’ (or ‘spike hilt’) sword of the Geibig Type 5 / Oakeshott Type Xa variety.

Durendal was discovered in 1758 during the restoration of a small church near the Cirque de Gavarnie, in south-western France. The locals presented it to their patron, the Vicomte de Hauteville. In 1785, the viscount gifted Durendal to Madrid’s Museo Nacional del Prado. It remained there until 1882, and the beginning of my story.

Durendal's stats are as follows:

Overall Length: 41.12" (104 cm)

Blade Length: 35.87"(91 cm)

Blade Width: 1.93" (5 cm)

Point of Balance: 6.75” (17 cm)

Center of Percussion: 22.37 (53 cm)

Weight: 2 lbs (1.1 kilos)


Durendal isn’t typical of most 10th-century European swords. It is not pattern-welded. The smith(s) of Durendal created high quality carbon-steel blades. The grip is wooden, wrapped in a leather treated with bees wax.

The blade is inscribed with the iron-inlaid word DURENDAL.

A few high-end sword-smiths began ‘signing’ - or trademarking - their product during the Germanic Migration period. Ulfberht and Ingelrii were the most famous of these. Durendal was another. It is suspected that the name is an elaborate linguistic pun. Dur is the Latin word for hard. Enduring is durans. Durend is an obscure Frankish name that appeared at some point in the Carolingian dynasty. It became popular - as Durand - after the Norman Invasions. The Italians turned it into a first name (Dante) and a surname (Durante). It is the perfect cognomen for a sword master, who oversees the creation of a weapon that is hard, durable, and enduring.

Anachronistically, this weapon has been popularly associated with Hruodland, a Frankish military governor of the Breton March. Hruodland - whose name was later modernized to Roland (by the French) and Orlando (by the Italians) - became one of the central figures of medieval romance literature.

Although pitted, the blade itself was remarkably well-preserved, having been sheathed in leather and stored inside of a champlevé gilt-copper reliquary box. A scrap of parchment was kept with the sword. Although barely legible, it apparently read:

(Latin) “… haec deinde se servaturum testatus est” (“… then he swore allegiance.”)

(Old French) “Por Deu amor et por christien pople et nos commun sauvement, d’este dis eun avan, eun quant Dieux savier et pooir mihi dunat, et si sauver io chist mon sendra Karlun, et eun ayde ad mon spede Durendal et eun cuadhuna cosa ensi cuum hon par droict som rex.”

(“For the love of God and Christendom, and for our common salvation, from this day forth, as much as God shall give me knowledge and power, I will protect my lord Charles and will aid him with my sword Durendal or whatever else is at hand, as one ought to protect one’s king.”)

(Latin) ‘Quibus peractis Hroudlandus Cenomanus tenus per ducatus Cenomannicus.’”

(“With this completed, Hroudland left for Le Mans via the Breton March.”)


I have absolutely no idea how Durendal travelled from it's smithy forge to an 18th century reliquary box in Cirque de Gavarnie.

Keeping in mind that this pleasant little fiction is the work of much research, feel free to include it in whatever way you wish.


message 16: by C.B. Matson (new)

C.B. Matson Your research is fantastic, Michael. I love the back-story and am glad you're staying within historical norms.

If Durendal is high quality steel, but not figured or pattern-welded, then I'm not sure where it could have come from (at least, not in the 10th century). Definately not "false Damascus," from Europe, nor would it be Levantine (true Damascus). Malabar wootz was the best available steel-making iron at the time, but it still required hammer-forging (with the inevitable figuring) to make a decent sword.

So what was the secret of Durendal? Hmmm... the Chinese were making cast-steel by the 10th c. Maybe it was drawn from a Chinese billet? Or (more likely), did your research turn up an entirely different source of early Medieval sword steel?


message 17: by Michael (last edited Mar 09, 2016 11:18AM) (new)

Michael Lussier | 22 comments Mod
My guess would be Vikings (or even Shield Brethren) moving along the Volga trade route.

My notes are a jumble, but I did quite a bit of reading on ULFBERHT when I was thinking about the sword. Obviously, this particular DURENDAL was created long after Roland's death in 778. It is the legend and attribution that are important in my story, not historical legitimacy. DURENDAL is going to be used as a politicalized weapon during the 'Urabi Revolt.


message 18: by Michael (new)

Michael Lussier | 22 comments Mod
This story had a complex beginning. I had to split the original idea into two separate tales, separated by 15 years time.

My first thought was that Durend was the great sword master of Tyrshammar. A subplot in THE BUTCHER'S TOWER is that Clovis, the legendary Merovingian king, had been trained in the arts of war at Tyrshammar. At his "graduation" he was sent home with a special sword and shield worthy of his rank. That sword was originally Durendal, but is now something completely different... a weapon more realistically reflective of that period. I might post details of that later as well.


message 19: by Mike, Vor Dweeb (new)

Mike Voss | 60 comments Mod
this particular DURENDAL was created long after Roland's death

My link to Durendal in CruxP does reference the legendary sword of Roland, as part of a philosophical discussion about such blades in relation to the one Merrill finds himself wielding - and will make a direct reference to the search alluded to in Beast of Calatrava and the events detailed in Marshall versus the Assassins.

I assume you make it clear in your story that it is a different Durendal you are introducing?


message 20: by C.B. Matson (new)

C.B. Matson Vikings? Of course, meteoritic iron... metal of legends.


message 21: by Michael (new)

Michael Lussier | 22 comments Mod
Being a fan of Mircea Eliade’s The Forge and the Crucible, of course I prefer my magical weapons to be made from meteoritic iron.

However, there is also quite a bit of evidence that Væringjar Vikings transported crucible steel along the Volga trade route and colluded with Frankish sword-smiths in the Rhineland. At least two 10th century ULFBERHT swords were forged from hypoeutectoid steel that is believed to have originated in Central Asia. That's my conspiracy theory and I'm sticking to it... at least until I can be properly shamed into forming another...


message 22: by C.B. Matson (new)

C.B. Matson Nope, Michael, I think your theory is excellent. The Vikings traded all the way down the Volga to Astrakhan and across to the Don into the Black Sea and Byzantium. Very likely they could have obtained crucible steel from China that arrived via the Central Asian silk road routes. Cool back-story... even if it's not needed in the overall plot.


message 23: by C.B. Matson (new)

C.B. Matson Cloven is hitting 125k this weekend. Killed off a Stark, but maybe not the one you think. Prots are converging on Karakorum, queuing up for the Grand Kablooie. Then, then? HA, hahaha! [rubs hands] on to Moonlight where Cnan finally confronts that demonic sorcerer (we know who) deep in his subterranean lair.


message 24: by Michael (last edited Apr 21, 2016 08:39AM) (new)

Michael Lussier | 22 comments Mod
Durendal sat me down last night and gave me a good talking to.

“Look,” it said: “This just isn’t working. The story you are telling has diverged from the story you originally intended to tell. I’m afraid, my good-natured blockhead, that you must emulate Tao Te Ching (or Buddha, or whomever) and bend like a reed in the wind, etcetera.”

Thus, I’m proud to announce that Durandel shall henceforth be called Zulfiqar.

The revised plot will involve a one-legged swordsman, Corsican bandits, a reconstructed Order of Assassins, an audacious train robbery, a magical sword, superspy Sir Richard Francis Burton, a proto-Batman/Ra's al Ghul training sequence, the Battle of Kafr-el-Dawwar, an Aga Khan, Prince Albert Victor, and a certain Ms. Irene Adler (in a form will most assuredly cause Sir Arthur Conan Doyle to rapidly whirl deasil within his tomb).

Durandel itself has become a whole ‘nother thing. I shall relay whatever information is made known to me. Be warned, however: my stories are stubborn little bastards, and I am always the last to learn anything.


message 25: by Mike, Vor Dweeb (new)

Mike Voss | 60 comments Mod
Michael wrote: "Durendal sat me down last night and gave me a good talking to...my stories are stubborn little bastards, and I am always the last to learn anything.

I know how that goes :-)

Fortunately both Crux Passages and sequel Forest for the Trees seem to be willing enough to stand as they are, although the latter may yet balk when I start writing it. If so, it will end up the better for it, I'm sure.

I had a good idea that I thought would fit in short story format earlier this year - something I could hammer out quickly and show the world I really can finish something! - but when I outlined it another freaking novella emerged instead. I may yet try to wrestle it into shorter form, but Foreworld first!


message 26: by Michael (new)

Michael Lussier | 22 comments Mod
One of the hardest tasks for any author might be balancing creativity with discipline. Some ideas burn like a fever inside my head for a day or two; but the actual work of turning them into a pile of words and pages is sheer drudgery. However, the later is a tangible relic of the former - your glorious imagination's emissary to the rest of the human race. Books or it didn't happen.


message 27: by Mike, Vor Dweeb (new)

Mike Voss | 60 comments Mod
Michael wrote: The revised plot will involve a one-legged swordsman, Corsican bandits, a reconstructed Order of Assassins, an audacious train robbery, a magical sword, superspy Sir Richard Francis Burton, a proto-Batman/Ra's al Ghul training sequence, the Battle of Kafr-el-Dawwar, an Aga Khan, Prince Albert Victor, and a certain Ms. Irene Adler (in a form will most assuredly cause Sir Arthur Conan Doyle to rapidly whirl deasil within his tomb).

You may have to provide me with a reading list of sources or I'll miss the majority of references in this tome, Michael!


message 28: by Mike, Vor Dweeb (last edited Apr 21, 2016 09:31AM) (new)

Mike Voss | 60 comments Mod
Books or it didn't happen.

I can die knowing I have witnessed this phrase. Funniest thing I've read on the net in forever!

And oh so true!


message 29: by Michael (new)

Michael Lussier | 22 comments Mod
No, I plan on laying everything out quickly and with clarity. Part of the fun will be in how these characters interact, and the roles they use to disguise themselves. Each revelation (ideally) will be delightful; build-up, misdirection and pay-off.

The wonder of KindleWorlds is that a writer won't learn certain lessons until their work is in the public eye. Isle of Dogs taught me an incredible amount about form, technique and expectation. I owe a hell of a lot to Tony Wolf (whose patient and incisive editing shaped my story into something infinitely better than it originally was) and my reviewers.


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