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Publishing and Promoting > Publishing with Createspace

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message 1: by J.J. (new)

J.J. Hanna | 23 comments Does anyone know if CreateSpace allows you to have your work published in other places as well? For example, I have a book published through the obscure little POD self publishing website called The Book Patch, and I know that they are not opposed to having your book published elsewhere, but does anyone know CreateSpace's rules regarding that? I've looked and can't seem to find them. I just want to know:

A) how CreateSpace works, and
B) can I leave my book in The Book Patch when I add it to CreateSpace?


message 2: by J.D. (new)

J.D. Wayne (jdwayne) | 2 comments I'm pretty sure they'll allow it. But if you want to find out for certain, just send them an email asking. They're pretty good about responding promptly to questions. I hope this helps. What's your book so I can check it out?


message 3: by Sheila (new)

Sheila Cronin | 114 comments It's easy to get confused since createspace is owned by amazon. Are you thinking of amazon's kindle select program? Making a spreadsheet helped me to keep the various dos and don'ts straight.


message 4: by J.J. (new)

J.J. Hanna | 23 comments I mainly want to know how CreateSpace works. What they offer, how you get the most of it for the cheapest amount of money, can I leave my book, Existence, where it is and ALSO have it go on CreateSpace?


message 5: by Mellie (last edited Feb 28, 2016 12:22PM) (new)

Mellie (mellie42) | 618 comments Jori wrote: "I mainly want to know how CreateSpace works. What they offer, how you get the most of it for the cheapest amount of money...."

Firstly, read your contract with the Book Patch. If they hold exclusive rights your questions are moot, as legally you cannot publish your book elsewhere, except with them.

Next, are you asking about paperbacks or e-books with CreateSpace? It's not advisable to do e-books through CS, go direct. For paperbacks, CreateSpace is simple, it doesn't cost a cent as it is POD. You upload your cover and interior file. How much you make depends on the trim size you chose and number of pages. The more pages the less you make per book. You'll make the most if people buy direct from the CS store, next best profit is sales via Amazon. If you chose expanded distribution the profit margins drops again.

It's very hard to make money with paperbacks unless your e-book is selling like gangbusters or you have a colouring book. Most people sell single digit quantities of paperbacks a month. You'd be better off to concentrate on selling your e-book and to do that (as you were advised by numerous people in your other thread) you need to pull your e-book from the Book Patch and take it wide. You cannot start distributing your book elsewhere if it contravenes your contract with the Book Patch.

Once you have your e-book on other channels, like Amazon, Apple, B&N, Kobo, then you can look at marketing and promotion to boost your readership.


message 6: by J.J. (new)

J.J. Hanna | 23 comments In that case, how do I go direct? What do I use, where do I publish? (The only publishing I know is from The BookPatch.)


message 7: by K.A. (new)

K.A. Krisko (kakrisko) Kindle Direct = ebooks
Createspace = paperbacks

for Amazon.

I usually get the ebook in order first, then work on the paperback because the covers are more difficult for paperbacks (I use original art, not their cover creator, and buy my own ISBN numbers through Bowker).

Once you have the formats ready for the two services above, it's easy to manipulate them a small amount to make them fit services for other suppliers, such as Barnes & Noble.


message 8: by Mellie (last edited Feb 28, 2016 05:56PM) (new)

Mellie (mellie42) | 618 comments Jori wrote: "In that case, how do I go direct? What do I use, where do I publish?"

You create an account with the retailers where you want to sell your books. With Amazon you need a KDP account, with Apple it's iTunes Connect. Same with B&N or Kobo, you create a seller account. Then you upload your e-book file. By going direct you have all the control over pricing, keywords, categories and running any promotion.

You also need an actual cover, not what appears to be a placeholder image.

BUT you need to resolve the issue with BookPatch first. You cannot publish elsewhere if they hold rights to your book. You need then to pull their e-book version.


message 9: by J.J. (new)

J.J. Hanna | 23 comments Thank you!

Also, I uploaded the new cover today. Is there any way to set the new edition as the default?


message 10: by Nagwa (new)

Nagwa Malik (nagwamalik) | 25 comments Jori wrote: "Does anyone know if CreateSpace allows you to have your work published in other places as well? For example, I have a book published through the obscure little POD self publishing website called Th..."

Hi,
I have used Createspace, and as far as i know there are no restrictions, because I published on smashwords as well. And they are very helpful, you know, ask them anything and they will give you a detailed reply.


message 11: by Gary (new)

Gary Gillett | 6 comments How are they for pagination? It's between them and another resource. Thanks!


message 12: by David (new)

David Wake (davidwake) | 14 comments Gary wrote: "How are they for pagination? It's between them and another resource. Thanks!"

It's entirely up to you, you are in charge of generating a PDF file to upload. You can do it well or badly.


message 13: by Brent (new)

Brent Griffiths (bjgriffiths) | 1 comments I was pretty impressed with CreateSpace they have a number of templates that you can download to help format your text for paperback. It took me a couple of hours to copy and paste, but it was worth it to get a paperback version of my novel for a little work and virtually no cost.


message 14: by Liangzhi (new)

Liangzhi Gao | 16 comments Thank you ! I am publishing my E-book . Smashwords is good website.


message 15: by Nagwa (new)

Nagwa Malik (nagwamalik) | 25 comments Liangzhi wrote: "Thank you ! I am publishing my E-book . Smashwords is good website."

In terms of e-book publishing and distribution Smashwords is probably the best idea :)


message 16: by J.J. (last edited Mar 05, 2016 07:02PM) (new)

J.J. Hanna | 23 comments Nagwa wrote: In terms of e-book publishing and distribution Smashwords is probably the best idea :)"

Can you tell me some about Smash Words? They do eBooks, I know that, and I know that they can sell the eBooks in many places, but is there a list of where they sell?

Also, does anyone know how to get my book on Amazon to link with the link here?


message 17: by Liangzhi (new)

Liangzhi Gao | 16 comments Sorry.I am not so clear. Perhaps on its website.


message 18: by T.R. (new)

T.R. Robinson (t_r_robinson) | 56 comments Jori wrote: "Nagwa wrote: In terms of e-book publishing and distribution Smashwords is probably the best idea :)"

Can you tell me some about Smash Words? They do eBooks, I know that, and I know that they can s..."


Sign-on to 'smashwords.com', then click on the tab at the top 'How to Publish on Smashwords'. A graphic list is immediately shown and slightly further down you will find a text list among the notes.

Linking from Amazon: I assume you mean you would like those looking at your book on Amazon to also see your Goodreads profile/page. I do not think you can do this straight from the book but you could add your Goodreads url in your 'Author Bio.'

Hope this helps. Have to say I like Smashwords. It is relatively easy to publish with them provided you follow Mark Coker's Style Guide. Just be aware you cannot rush it. If you follow step by step you should have no problem getting your book into their premium catalogue meaning your book will be available through all the sites they link with.


message 19: by J.J. (new)

J.J. Hanna | 23 comments By linking to amazon, I mean that when you click the link on the goodreads book page that's something like "buy it on amazon" it comes up with a bunch of other books with the same title, and not mine, although my book is on Amazon. Should I ask the goodreads librarians about this or is there another way to make it easier to find?


message 20: by T.R. (new)

T.R. Robinson (t_r_robinson) | 56 comments Jori wrote: "By linking to amazon, I mean that when you click the link on the goodreads book page that's something like "buy it on amazon" it comes up with a bunch of other books with the same title, and not mi..."

Yes I think you do need to contact the librarians; they have the access rights to change things. Unfortunately, this is a problem with titles. I have always been surprised we cannot copyright a title. But the law allows anyone to use a title. There are even some where there are multiple books and even LPs with the same. I have found the librarians very good and helpful.


message 21: by J.J. (new)

J.J. Hanna | 23 comments Ok. :) Thank you very much for your help!


message 22: by Brooks (new)

Brooks Kohler It's easy to get confused. I recommend you call CreateSpace. I've called them before and received information I couldn't find online.

Best of luck to you.


message 23: by Debbie's Spurts (D.A.) (last edited Mar 07, 2016 01:33PM) (new)

Debbie's Spurts (D.A.) Jori wrote: "Is there any way to set the new edition as the default?"

Only the author (not even goodreads librarians) can set.

Just go to that edition, click edit book details and midway down righthand column you can set it as the primary/default/featured edition (from #4 of the author FAQs in librarians group, the help desk for book specific issues).

Usually takes 10 minutes to 72 hours for the change to populate everywhere on goodreads -- particularly areas with a lot of image thumbnails like book lists and the series info on author pages.

If the purchase links are not finding your ebook on Amazon easily, it's usually an asin missing, particularly if you have a new edition with a new cover but forgot to get a new asin (tried to re-use old asin).

"...Does anyone know if CreateSpace allows you to have your work published in other places as well? For example, I have a book published through the obscure little POD self publishing website called The Book Patch, and I know that they are not opposed to having your book published elsewhere, but does anyone know CreateSpace's rules regarding that? I've looked and can't seem to find them. I just want to know..."

Createspace just cares that you are the copyright holder and have all publishing rights. They are clear that theirs is a "non-exclusive Service Agreement..., you retain all right, title and interest in and to the Content, including all patent, copyright, trademark, service mark, mask work, moral right, trade secret or other intellectual property or proprietary right (collectively, "Intellectual Property Rights") therein. Subject to your underlying rights in the Content, as between the parties, we [Createspace] will own all right, title and interest in and to the templates and other materials created, provided or used by us in our performance under this Agreement..." -- https://eu.createspace.com/pub/signup...

Current and future non-Createspace publishers will have own opinions and contract wordings regarding a book having been or being printed by Createspace. If publisher created artwork or cover design, you'll need permission to re-use (and may owe fees for cover design, editing and other services if getting out of a contract or getting their agreement to use Createspace).

Was/Is Book Patch the book's publisher with a publishing contract granting them rights or were they just a printing service you used to print the paperbacks who received no copyright rights you'd need to revert in order to publish elsewhere? If a publisher wth a contract granting exclusive rights, they'd likely have to agree to your publishing via Createspace; if not exclusive rights would depend on contract wording but likely they'd have to grant permission; if contract didn't explain how to revert your rights you'll need to negotiate that.

Upthread mentioned "expanded distribution" for when you do print on demand via Createspace. That's for making the Createspace paperback also available outside Amazon, including to Barnes and Noble and listing in the mainstream databases brick and mortar bookstores order from.

The paperback through The Book Patch, if they are your publisher versus just printing copies you pay for, should also be making your paperback book available on Amazon. If they are not, do whatever is legally necessary to get out of that contract and have your publishing rights reverted.

If The Book Patch does have your paperback available for sale on Amazon, readers ordering aren't really likely to care or even notice if book was provided/printed via Creatspace or Book Patch. The sales should be the same on Amazon, although some readers will see "Creatspace" as synonymous with "self-published.". The difference in sales of Createspace versus Book Patch editions is more likely to vary by where each distributes your book outside of Amazon (many authors forget to check the Createspace expanded distribution option or choose not to because of lower profit margin).

If Book Patch isn't distributing your book anywhere or making available to order -- particularly if skipping the "biggies" ( like Amazon, Ingram/onix, etc.) -- exactly how are they publishing your book versus just printing it? Particularly if they don't make it easy to get your rights back, consult a lawyer about the contract -- a useful phrase might be "failure to publish."

Createspace asks/gets no rights beyond being a print on demand service fulfilled by Amazon and distributed/sold where agreed. If you use their free ISBN numbers and cancel using them, you just cannot re-use those ISBNs. The same goes if you used their templates instead of your own artwork/setups. Part of the digits in an ISBN indicate the publisher/printer so will be Createspace exclusive but you can publish or print anywhere else you want so long as not using their numbers, not re-using their cover templates, and your new publisher agrees (you can pull the book from Createspace whenever you want).


message 24: by Miss M (new)

Miss M | 84 comments Jori wrote: "By linking to amazon, I mean that when you click the link on the goodreads book page that's something like "buy it on amazon" it comes up with a bunch of other books with the same title, and not mi..."

While you're re-setting your default edition, you should also add your ISBN(s) info to that edition. You won't/don't have an ASIN since you don't have an Amazon e-book for sale.


message 25: by J.J. (new)

J.J. Hanna | 23 comments Thank you everyone! This is very helpful.


message 26: by Nancy (new)

Nancy Hartney | 21 comments I've noticed some small press publishers use CreateSpace as their jobber. Keep checking. Keep calling. Keep working.


message 27: by Anita (new)

Anita (anitalouiserobertsonyahoocom) | 9 comments I have used CreateSpace for both of my novels and will use it again for the third book this Summer. They are very professional, and I believe you get your money's worth. Their support team is reachable 24/7 and VERY helpful. I can't imagine why they would care if you published it another way as well, although Amazon has a couple of rules about exclusive Kindle use for e-books. I highly recommend CreateSpace for support, product and cover design.


message 28: by Debbie's Spurts (D.A.) (last edited Mar 14, 2016 06:53PM) (new)

Debbie's Spurts (D.A.) Nancy wrote: "I've noticed some small press publishers use CreateSpace as their jobber. Keep checking. Keep calling. Keep working."

And be careful what you pay for -- if all a "publisher" or service is doing for you is using Createspace to print-on-demand to make a hard copy available on Amazon, why pay just for that since you can go through Createspace yourself? Other services as well, sure; but, not if you provide just as much cover art or other stuff where Createspace woukd have stepped you through for free.

I've been flabbergasted to see some sites and services charging a pretty penny to get your published book added to goodreads. Something you or any goodreads member can just do (or request a goodreads librarian do for you). Particularly bad was an ad offering to add author's Createspace books to goodreads for a multi-hundred dollar fee -- particularly bad because goodreads gets an Amazon data feed that would eventually add for free (plus checking the free "expanded distribution" option adds book to data feeds many book sites and stores -- including goodreads -- use; again, for free).


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