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Quirky Questions > QQ: With which 3 Victorian authors would you like to dine? Why?

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message 1: by Renee, Moderator (new)

Renee M | 1877 comments Mod
Also, what would you talk about?


message 2: by Textiq (new)

Textiq | 2 comments Rabindranath Tagore, Elizabeth Gaskell, and Anthony Trollope come over, and just as the roast goose is being piped in (because I won't have haggis in the house), Charles Dickens, Louisa May Alcott and W.E.B. DuBois drop in, arm in arm and slightly tipsy, singing the "Di Quel Amor' aria from Traviata, with Emily Bronte following them about a half a block behind and looking confused. But we're all glad to see them because we love them, plus they've brought a huge rack of lamb and some absinthe.

We've barely had time to find the absinthe glasses when Giuseppe Verdi storms in grumping about people who should never, ever sing under any circumstances dishonoring other people's arias in the public street and absconding with their absinthe and Emily Bronte.

Charlotte comes in right behind him, also looking for Emily, but seeing that she and Rab Tagore are in the corner quietly having a metaphysical poem-off between bites of goose, she rolls her eyes and settles for a glass of absinthe.

We all have a delightful time mocking the dreadful fashion choices of everybody who isn't there, and as it becomes clear that the evening has glissaded into a sleepover, ornamental loungewear is found for everyone and we decorously transition to prank calling politicians followed by a formal extemporaneous debate - Resolved: Jo should've married Laurie. After round three, or maybe seven, we become drowsy, and are gently lulled to sleep by our brilliance...


message 3: by Renee, Moderator (new)

Renee M | 1877 comments Mod
Hahaha! That was awesome! What a fun evening!


message 4: by Deborah (new)

Deborah (deborahkliegl) | 923 comments Just three? That's a tough one. Wilkie Collins because he made me fall in love with Victorian literature. Mary Braddon because she's such an interesting woman. And Thomas Hardy or Anthony Trollope because I love their use of language.


message 5: by Renee, Moderator (new)

Renee M | 1877 comments Mod
I can totally picture that in my head. :D


message 6: by LindaH (new)

LindaH | 499 comments Charles Dickens, George Eliot, Harriet Martineau...because I'd ask CD how The Mystery of Edwin Drood ends, and then all four of us talking about the role of women then and now. And just to be in their company!


message 7: by Pip (new)

Pip | 817 comments Textiq wrote: "Rabindranath Tagore, Elizabeth Gaskell, and Anthony Trollope come over, and just as the roast goose is being piped in (because I won't have haggis in the house), Charles Dickens, Louisa May Alcott ..."

Absolutely inspired, Textiq! You had me in stitches reading this :-D

I can't answer the original question because my brain has been taken over by images of Dickens in ornamental loungewear. And this: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=nR-MG9l...


message 8: by Renee, Moderator (new)

Renee M | 1877 comments Mod
Nice!


message 9: by Renee, Moderator (new)

Renee M | 1877 comments Mod
For me, I think it would definitely be Anthony Trollope, and Wilkie Collins because I just love their characters and would want to pick their brains on how they were able to create such a proliferation while keeping them interesting and unique. The third party is more difficult. I suspect Hardy might be a downer and Dickens to be too full of himself. The Brontes scare me. Perhaps Gaskell or Braddon? I'd be interested to see how they were able to compete so successfully with the gentlemen for print space.


message 10: by LindaH (new)

LindaH | 499 comments Renee, I agree about the Brontes. I can't imagine conversing with any of them, they lived so much in their heads.


message 11: by Pip (new)

Pip | 817 comments Linda wrote: "Renee, I agree about the Brontes. I can't imagine conversing with any of them, they lived so much in their heads."

Plus, you'd probably catch some nasty disease from them ;-)


message 12: by Renee, Moderator (new)

Renee M | 1877 comments Mod
"Pass the salt."


message 13: by Pip (new)

Pip | 817 comments Hee hee!

You know, I think there's a danger in inviting three of these people to dinner; they all knew each other quite well and I'd probably feel left out. On a one-to-one basis, I'd say definitely Wilkie Collins as long as he was reasonably lucid - addicts are not much fun to be with unless they're sharing their gear and I don't think I'm ready for laudanum yet. He was apparently great fun to be with, was a snappy dresser and knew how to show the ladies a good time.

Braddon, too, would be fun I think, having got to know a little about her during our reading of Lady Audley. I admire how she was able to take her family life and career into her own hands and gain an independence most Victorian women didn't even know to dream about.

Finally, Oscar Wilde. Because.... Really?! Do you need a reason?! Though maybe not if it was 1895-7; I don't imagine Victorian prison food to have been up to my exacting standards.


message 14: by Frances (new)

Frances (francesab) | 306 comments I would invite Dickens-his bio's make him sound fascinating (and I can put up with full of himself if it's justified!)


message 15: by Sara (new)

Sara | 12 comments I'd definitely have the Bronte sisters come over my place. We could have a quiet evening in, discussing how women are portrayed in literature. And if they were up to it, how romantic relationships are romanticised. I've always had this feeling that Emily has a quite different - and darker - view on the topic than her sisters.


message 16: by Pip (new)

Pip | 817 comments Frances wrote: "I would invite Dickens-his bio's make him sound fascinating (and I can put up with full of himself if it's justified!)"

I'd come and join you if you think we could persuade him to make his female characters less sugary!

I've still not read a complete Dickens biography. I see you've been reading the Claire Tomalin. Is it as good as everyone says?


message 17: by Pip (new)

Pip | 817 comments Sara wrote: "I'd definitely have the Bronte sisters come over my place. We could have a quiet evening in, discussing how women are portrayed in literature. And if they were up to it, how romantic relationships ..."

Interesting, Sara.I haven't read all of the Bronte novels (though I have read what are considered the major novels by each sister) and I think they're all pretty dark in their own way. I should point out that I'm an official Wuthering Heights Hater, but I do think Emily would be fascinating to chat to despite - or maybe because of - that!


message 18: by Frances (new)

Frances (francesab) | 306 comments Pip wrote: I've still not read a complete Dickens biography. I see you've been reading the Claire Tomalin. Is it as good as everyone says?

I've been reading only as far as I've gone in the novel reads, so I still haven't finished it. I've found it fascinating-I can't believe he accomplished half of what he did-and the variety of his life and works is incredible.


message 19: by Sara (new)

Sara | 12 comments Pip wrote: "I should point out that I'm an official Wuthering Heights Hater, but I do think Emily would be fascinating to chat to despite - or maybe because of - that!"

Now you had me thinking. It's interesting because, yes, I would find it very interesting to chat to authors whose books I strongly dislike (I'm talking of great writers, though; not books I hate for being sloppy work).


message 20: by Renee, Moderator (new)

Renee M | 1877 comments Mod
Anyone want to plan their perfect Victorian dinner party?


message 21: by Lenora (new)

Lenora Robinson | 37 comments Jane Austen, Emily Bronte' and Charles Dickens.


message 22: by Natalie (new)

Natalie Tyler (doulton) | 186 comments I've been thinking this one over. I did not want to answer too quickly. But now I have a response: it might be wild and there might be biting and strange meat, but I would select Swinburne, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, and William Morris. I would love to listen to them speak of aesthetics and their philosophies of art and the belles-lettres.


message 23: by Lynne, In Memoriam (new)

Lynne Pennington (bluemoonladylynne) | 243 comments Mod
I would choose Disraeli, Twain, and Oscar Wilde. That would make for a lively group, and I suspect we would have to lay in a goodly supply of wine (and other libations).


message 24: by Lynne, In Memoriam (new)

Lynne Pennington (bluemoonladylynne) | 243 comments Mod
Renee wrote: "Anyone want to plan their perfect Victorian dinner party?"

I really like that idea! Let's fine-tune it a bit and send to all members and see what kind of response we get. Shall we include recipes?


message 25: by Terrence (new)

Terrence Perera (terrenceperera) | 6 comments I would choose Anthony Trollope, Jane Austen and Agatha Christie because they are the authors I am most familiar with.


message 26: by Piyumi (last edited Mar 07, 2017 12:10AM) (new)

Piyumi | 22 comments Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Elizabeth Gaskell and Oscar Wilde....each has such a unique perspective of the human condition, I would just let them take over the dinner conversation :)


message 27: by Renee, Moderator (new)

Renee M | 1877 comments Mod
Heehee. I'd like to quietly serve that meal. Standing in the background and listening ... And occasionally breaking in with a dish of peas.


message 28: by Piyumi (new)

Piyumi | 22 comments Renee wrote: "Heehee. I'd like to quietly serve that meal. Standing in the background and listening ... And occasionally breaking in with a dish of peas."

Right on Renee :D


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