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message 1: by Kirstin, Moderator (new)

Kirstin Pulioff | 252 comments Mod
This month we are focusing on two books. Among the Shrouded by Amalie Jahn, and The Well's End by Seth Fishman.

I look forward to a healthy discussion about them both, and seeing what you thought about the characters, conflict, endings.


message 2: by Kirstin, Moderator (new)

Kirstin Pulioff | 252 comments Mod
Here is the infomration about Seth Fishman's novel, The Well's End:

Sixteen-year-old Mia Kish's small town of Fenton, Colorado is known for three things: being home to the world's tallest sycamore tree, the national chicken-thigh-eating contest and one of the ritziest boarding schools in the country, Westbrook Academy. But when emergency sirens start blaring and Westbrook is put on lockdown, quarantined and surrounded by soldiers who shoot first and ask questions later, Mia realizes she's only just beginning to discover what makes Fenton special.

And the answer is behind the wall of the Cave, aka Fenton Electronics, of which her father is the Director. Mia's dad has always been secretive about his work, allowing only that he's working for the government. But unless Mia's willing to let the whole town succumb to a strange illness that ages people years in a matter of hours, the end result death, she's got to break quarantine, escape the school grounds and outsmart armed soldiers to uncover the truth.

Bio:
Seth Fishman is a native of Midland, Texas (think Friday Night Lights) and a graduate of the Princeton University and The University of East Anglia in Norwich, England. He spends his days as a literary agent at The Gernert Company and his nights (and mornings) writing. He lives in Jersey City, New Jersey. This is his first novel (that's not in a drawer).

Blurbs:
Seth Fishman kills it in every possible way." ~ Margaret Stohl, New York Times Bestselling co-author of Beautiful Creatures and Icons.

"A compulsive read, a kick-ass heroine and a brilliantly plotted adventure, THE WELL'S END is going to be THE must-read book of 2014. Fishman writes with verve, originality and complete control, delivering satisfying twists and extraordinary surprises. Brilliant!" ~ John Boyne, New York Times Bestselling author of The Boy With The Striped Pajamas.

"A crackling thriller that keeps you turning the pages until the very end." ~ Jennifer Smith, author of The Statistical Probability of Love at First Sight.

"A smart and wonderfully throwback adventure. Philip Pullman fans take notice. Don't miss Fishman's mind-bending debut." ~ Matthew Quick, New York Times Bestselling author of The Silver Linings Playbook and Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock.


message 3: by Kirstin, Moderator (new)

Kirstin Pulioff | 252 comments Mod
Here is info about Amalie Jahn's novel, Among the Shrouded:

It was February. Through the eyes of the average person, it was an ordinary Tuesday, unremarkable in every way. Around the world, approximately 370,000 babies were born on that ordinary day.

Although brought into the world under very different circumstances, there was nothing ordinary about three of the children born on that day who happened to be blessed with extraordinary abilities. Growing up, none of the children could begin to comprehend the importance of the gifts each was given. Now as adults, all three are unaware that they are on a collision course with one another as well as their common destiny.

Amalie Jahn, author of the acclaimed novel
The Clay Lion, delivers a compelling story of courage and perseverance. Among the Shrouded traces the lives of the Baltimore City police officer, the abandoned son of a junkie, and the dedicated sister born on that ordinary Tuesday on a journey that reveals the significance of each of their gifts and the greater purpose of their collective lives.

Bio:
Writing has always been an important part my life. As a child, I loved writing fiction stories. I kept journals about the boys I loved, especially the ones who never loved me back. I convinced myself I would become the next Ann M. Martin when I won a literary award for a short story I wrote in seventh grade. After that however, the creative writing I loved was set aside, lost to the dreaded five paragraph essay as I entered high school and college. Eventually, I transitioned to lesson plan writing as I began a career as an elementary school teacher. When I became a wife and mother, I started an online blog to document the life of my children and found myself writing, many, many to-do lists just trying to keep my little family afloat. On one of those to-do lists, I included "write a novel." For many years, that item remained perpetually on the list as there was neither time for writing nor an idea worthy of composition. And then, life happened, the way life usually does, and the story behind The Clay Lion was inspired by the illness and subsequent death of a child who was very dear to me. After writing the manuscript, I was encouraged by family and friends to attempt publication and at long last was able to cross "write a book" off my list. It was amazing to be able to come full circle, witnessing the publication of my first YA fiction novel in March of 2013. In November of the same year, I tried my hand at adult fiction with Among the Shrouded, hoping to bring awareness to the plight of human trafficking, a mission that is near to my heart. I am currently working on a follow up to The Clay Lion, entitled Tin Men with publication scheduled for Fall 2014. I live in North Carolina with my husband, two children, and two extremely overfed cats.


message 4: by Deborah (new)

Deborah (brandiec) Well, I'm sorry to see that there hasn't been much (any!) discussion of May's books, although I suppose I'm as much to blame for that as anyone else. I didn't read The Well's End, but I did read Among the Shrouded. I enjoyed it, particularly the chapters written from Mia's perspective, but I felt that Jahn was too heavy-handed with her message about human trafficking. I also found it very difficult to believe that no one took Mia's view of the commissioner's aura seriously, given that she'd never been mistaken before; surely the Baltimore Police Department has heard of police corruption before. Similarly, I couldn't believe that Kate didn't see what she was getting herself into; anyone with even the slightest familiarity with the news could see what was really going on.


message 5: by Adriano (new)

Adriano Bulla (adriano_bulla) | 44 comments Deborah wrote: "Well, I'm sorry to see that there hasn't been much (any!) discussion of May's books, although I suppose I'm as much to blame for that as anyone else. I didn't read The Well's End, but I did read Am..."

Hello Deborah,

I haven't read either book, however, I was wondering what you meant by 'heavy-handed'.

Ade


message 6: by Molly Anna (new)

Molly Anna (molly_anna) Deborah wrote: "Well, I'm sorry to see that there hasn't been much (any!) discussion of May's books, although I suppose I'm as much to blame for that as anyone else. I didn't read The Well's End, but I did read Am..."

I also did not read The Well's End (it didn't appeal to me), but did read Among the Shrouded. I enjoyed Mia's sections as well. On the other hand, I wish Jahn had taken the time to write more from Kate's and Thomas' perspectives. I felt Jahn cheated these two. Their "powers" were weak and barely mentionable, and this aspect of the story relating to the "bond" the three main characters have to each other was kind of pointless and unnecessary, especially in light of the bigger human rights message Jahn was trying to send.


message 7: by Deborah (new)

Deborah (brandiec) Ade, I felt that Jahn kept beating me over the head with her message, long after I had gotten it. Part of the problem was the way in which she conveyed her message, by, for example, having a police officer explain the issue of human trafficking to the police chief. Surely the chief of the Baltimore Police Department would have been sufficiently competent to be familiar with this issue.


message 8: by Christoph (last edited May 23, 2014 07:35AM) (new)

Christoph Fischer | 40 comments I think that the humanitarian message is obvious itself with a subject such as human trafficking. I didn't feel it was a repetition of such a message but a continuous reminder of what we are dealing with: human lives. In fiction this is so easily forgotten. Maybe I am too much of a softie but I thought it was great to show that this is not just characters in a story who this happens to. I was deeply touched while reading it.
I agree that Mia's section was the strongest.


message 9: by Christoph (new)

Christoph Fischer | 40 comments Martin wrote: "I like how this forum chooses books with deep themes. Often humanitarian. I'm a softie too, by the way..."

I am glad to hear I am not alone :-)


message 10: by Adriano (new)

Adriano Bulla (adriano_bulla) | 44 comments Deborah wrote: "Ade, I felt that Jahn kept beating me over the head with her message, long after I had gotten it. Part of the problem was the way in which she conveyed her message, by, for example, having a polic..."

Thanks.


message 11: by Seth (new)

Seth | 80 comments Well, if anyone had any particular questions for me (author of The Well's End) happy to answer!
Seth


message 12: by Christoph (new)

Christoph Fischer | 40 comments Seth wrote: "Well, if anyone had any particular questions for me (author of The Well's End) happy to answer!
Seth"


I could only find a hard-cover and an audio version of your book. Is it out on kindle Seth?


message 13: by Koyel (new)

Koyel Mitra (koyelevergreen) | 5 comments Congrats to the winners. Look forward to reading them.
kind regards,
Koyel


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