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Thirteen Reasons Why - December > Cassettes 6 & 7 (both sides), & the end

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message 1: by Kate (new)

Kate (infinitelynovel) If you're reading this, you have probably finished Thirteen Reasons Why! Let us know what you thought here.


message 2: by Reese (new)

Reese (wordsofmarvel) | 9 comments Why called Clay Skye at the end? Does he feel sorry that he didn't talk to her in the bus? Or is he afraid of losing her too? Maybe he thinks she's gonna kill herself like Hanna did? I don't know.


message 3: by Sandra (new)

Sandra (thedarkestpartsofsnow) Nerys wrote: "Why called Clay Skye at the end? Does he feel sorry that he didn't talk to her in the bus? Or is he afraid of losing her too? Maybe he thinks she's gonna kill herself like Hanna did? I don't know."

Yes, I think that Clay thought that Skye was a loner carrying all the weight of the world with her. In a previous chapter he told the reader that Skye never talked to anyone. And that she seemed depressed. So I think that it is his attempt at reaching out and wanting to prevent something like with Hannah happening to anybody else.


message 4: by Sandra (last edited Dec 08, 2015 09:33AM) (new)

Sandra (thedarkestpartsofsnow) Ok, I am going to be very honest here (spoilers ahead, but if you are on this page you should have finished the book by now): I am really really mad at Hannah! a) she was blaming everybody else for her problems and feelings instead of trying to stop the downward spiral, b) she involved Clay and Tony though both have never done anything wrong, those boys will feel guilty for the rest of their lifes, c) that whirlpool scene....wtf?? Why Hannah, why?? Was that your attempt at justifying the suicide?.

When I started reading the book I was quite intrigued. I really wanted to know what happened to Hannah, that was so horrible that the only way out was ending her own life. But in the course of the book I grew to dislike her more and more. Her reasons to end her life just didn't seem justified. In no way do I think the way people treated her was okay, especially guys treating women like fair game - absolute no go!! Should people think before they act?? Most definitely!! But Hannah was a willing victim, it felt like she WANTED people to treat her badly (again referring to that whirlpool scene). But should that be a reason to make a person feel guilty for the rest of their lifes because someone committed suicide? With the tapes Hannah did exactly what she was condeming throughout the entire novel: She acted without thinking and in the course might have destroyed other lifes.

Don't get me wrong, I think that (teenage) suicide is a very serious topic that should be discussed in more books. However, in 13RW, in my opinion, it was executed very poorly.


message 5: by Alja (new)

Alja (alyaofwinterfell) (alyaofwinterfell) | 3 comments First of all, let me say that I completely agree with what Sandra wrote in the post above. I have mixed feelings about this book because it grabbed my attention, I liked Clay and the narration of the story. But then again, the main point of focus is Hannah and I can't believe what a jerk she was. The way she was treated was awful but a lot of it was her doing (jacuzzi, the booth etc). People (like Clay) were willing to help but she never really made the effort, making the excuse that she's "too scared". This book for me screams first world problems, I mean, people all over the world are facing much worse things than Hannah and make it through. I feel no pity or connection to her, she was just a selfish spoiled kid who never thought about the effect on people's lives that the tapes will have. What about the girl who got raped?? She brought that event up with no thought on how it's going to affect this girl, nor did she think about the way her story will affect Clay or Tony who did nothing wrong. The tapes basically sent the message "my life is screwed up so here, let me screw up yours as well" I'm giving this book 2.5 stars because while I hated the main character and her "reasons", I did appreciate the pace and narration of the story.


message 6: by Sandra (last edited Dec 17, 2015 09:20AM) (new)

Sandra (gotathingforthings) | 26 comments Wow, Sandra. Haha, I'm named Sandra too.) You basically just summed up all my feelings and thoughts.

I read a review about this book where that person really loved it and said that this is how suicide is, something that builds up over time and that is why she loved the book. And I totally agree with that, taking your own life like this is something that happens after experience and experience. And I tried to think about what the review said and see if I agree with her, but I just don't. The book really carries an important theme and something that should be written about and discussed, but I just couldn't feel with Hannah. Maybe we are not supposed to sympathize with her, but I just... Yeah, I can't really find the words for it, but Sandra and Alja basically just said everything.

All in all - the book let me down, there was a lot of hype around it and I did not think it led up to my expectations. The books idea and beginning could have ended in a good story, but it just didn't. I really liked how the book was written, Clay's perspective and Hannah's tapes were nice together, and I give the book credit for that. I also think the message of the book is worth to look at, of course, to always think about your actions and see how much of an affect you have on people. All that is really important.

Well, thank you for the read guys and I would love to read more thought and opinions on the book!


message 7: by Sandra (new)

Sandra (thedarkestpartsofsnow) Alja wrote: "First of all, let me say that I completely agree with what Sandra wrote in the post above. I have mixed feelings about this book because it grabbed my attention, I liked Clay and the narration of t..."

I think if the author depicted a girl with depression who simply couldn't find a way out of her illness it would have been a whole different story. Unfortunately, the author made it look like Hannah was a defiant teenage brat who was out for revenge just to hurt others. It is really unfortunate, really, because the author could have created a unique story.


message 8: by Sandra (last edited Dec 30, 2015 03:27AM) (new)

Sandra (thedarkestpartsofsnow) Sandra wrote: "Wow, Sandra. Haha, I'm named Sandra too.) You basically just summed up all my feelings and thoughts.

I read a review about this book where that person really loved it and said that this is how sui..."


Haha, hi Sandra!! *waves*

Well, yes, I think that the snowball effect is a very real thing. And of course people usually don't kill themselves simply because one thing in their life went astray.
Unfortuately though, the author didn't depict Hannah as someone who suffered from a depression resulting from her experiences but someone who just wanted her revenge, someone whose sucide looked like a defiant reaction. The tone of the book was not one of helplessness and abandonment but that of spite. And that just totally threw me off.


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