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After Phrenology: Neural Reuse and the Interactive Brain
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2015 > BSP 124: Michael Anderson: neural reuse and embodied cognition

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message 1: by Ginger (new)

Ginger Campbell (GingerCampbell) | 313 comments Mod
I will be posting a new episode of Brain Science later tonight. It is an interview with Michael L. Anderson, author of After Phrenology: Neural Reuse and the Interactive Brain .


message 2: by Ginger (new)

Ginger Campbell (GingerCampbell) | 313 comments Mod
Here are the links:

Listen to mp3

Show notes for BSP 124


message 3: by Darryl (new)

Darryl Ferges | 5 comments I've enjoyed following as best I can the embodied cognition story, it keeps fitting with my ideas about acrobatic movement. I'm on 5th week living Bud Craig's tour de force up my spinal column and mean no disrespect to this great scientist. Jumping to this current episode I pose a question about this idea of changing and prioritizing neural pathways and even adapting on the fly. Are these pathways issued from modules that are identified as one thing or do they have a structure that is seperate and can maintain its results connected to different parts of the brain? Can a algorithm reposition in our brain and quickly change for homeostatic efficiency?


message 4: by Ken (new)

Ken Seidel | 7 comments I'm no neuroscientist, just a self-taught enthusiast, but I'd say you are correct. I call it re-circuiting. I've seen YouTube lectures showing axons growing toward a connection. I think it's happening all the time. My hypotheses is that you throw a need out their and our brain adapts toward it. Adaptation is the hallmark of who we are. What do you think?


message 5: by Darryl (new)

Darryl Ferges | 5 comments I have been trying to understand neuroplasticity for some time and thought it mostly about redirecting and using another module/circuit to process. With neural reuse single and many neurons can have many different groupings they form. The example of C elegans illustrates neurons being parts of many different groups. The example of blindfolded sighted participants learning Braille
Illustrated other parts being available when blindfold removed. Can brain "skin a cat" many different ways is more my question. Adaptation is part of homeostasis?


message 6: by Graham (new)

Graham Yates-osteopath | 3 comments I think the synaptic potential is immeasurable and therefore new pathways are constantly being created and blocked,not to mention glial cells.
I think of the importance of prediction in all of this.Our neuro,endocrine and immune systems are all guessing the future and therefore creates( in the great Bud Craig's view-a book I am still grappling with)a efficient use of our energy resources


message 7: by Ginger (new)

Ginger Campbell (GingerCampbell) | 313 comments Mod
Darryl wrote: "I've enjoyed following as best I can the embodied cognition story, it keeps fitting with my ideas about acrobatic movement. I'm on 5th week living Bud Craig's tour de force up my spinal column and ..."

Although it wasn't emphasized during our conversation, Dr. Anderson made the point that different parts of the brain are different, which is what makes certain areas better choices for certain coalitions. Who they are connected to, is part of what distinguishes one area from another, but there are probably many other features that we are not yet able to measure.


message 8: by Darryl (new)

Darryl Ferges | 5 comments Ok thanks Ginger, I was running with the brain as giant ram addressable processor and actually more like many sub processors connecting as models. All the way from fingertips to ten times the feedback, the model that describes this is emerging. The coach in me talks to the object, the performer talks to the subject mostly and both seem locked into the unfolding embodied cognition model. I see many examples of affects and effects and new pathways I've overlooked. I enjoy being on your pathway Ginger, thanks..


message 9: by Dalton (new)

Dalton Seymour | 20 comments




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